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South East Queensland Regional Plan - Introduction

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South East Queensland Regional Plan - Introduction ...

    SUBMISSION

DRAFT SOUTH EAST QUEENSLAND REGIONAL

    PLAN

    February 2005

     Page 1 of 7

    Contents

     Page

    Introduction…………………………………………………………………………… 2

    Support for a Regional Plan for South East Queensland…..…………………… 2

Importance of the effective protection of extractive resources and

    extractive industry operations in South East Queensland..…………………….. 2

Regional plan must reinforce the State Planning Policy: Protection

    of Extractive Resources……………..…………………………….………………… 3

    ? Map 4 Rural production and natural resources…………………… 4

    ? Integrated transport Desired regional outcome 5………………… 4

    ? Map 11 Transport infrastructure……………………………………. 4

    Extractive industry outside the urban footprint…………………………………… 5

    Extractive industry within the urban footprint…………………..………………… 5

    Nature conservation………………………………………………………………… 6

    Conclusion……………………………………………………….....……………….. 7

    Further discussion…………………………………………………………….…….. 7

Annexures

     Annexure 1 - Examples of a modern community‟s use of extractive material

Maps

     Map of the Northern Darlington Range Key Resource Area showing Regional

     Ecosystem Types, Essential Habitat and State Wildlife Corridors

CEMENT CONCRETE AND AGGREGATES AUSTRALIA

    Submission Draft South East Queensland Regional Plan February 2005

     Page 2 of 7

    Introduction

Cement Concrete and Aggregates Australia (CCAA) is the national association of the

    cement, concrete and extractive industries in Australia.

CCAA was formed by amalgamating a number of construction materials industry

    associations that existed throughout Australia including what were formerly the

    Cement and Concrete Association of Australia, the Australian Pre-Mixed Concrete

    Association and the Queensland Extractive Industries Association Inc.

CCAA continues the important role of its predecessor, the Cement and Concrete

    Association of Australia, which since 1928, has promoted and supported the use of

    cement and concrete products. However, it also represents the extractive materials

    industry; an industry vital to Australia‟s (and in this particular case, South East

    Queensland‟s) community, transport and other essential infrastructure needs.

CCAA is the only representative body for extractive industry operators in this State.

CCAA‟s membership, which spans the full spectrum from large public multi-national

    companies to smaller independent operators, accounts for the bulk of the 22 million

    tonnes of extractive material produced annually in South East Queensland, the

    market sales value of which is in excess of $400 million.

It is in relation to the extractive industry in this region that CCAA is pleased to make

    this submission in relation to the draft South East Queensland Regional Plan.

Support for a Regional Plan for South East Queensland

CCAA supports the introduction of a regional plan for the sustainable development of

    South East Queensland.

However, CCAA believes that in relation to the effective protection of extractive

    resources and extractive industry operations in South East Queensland the current

    draft is deficient in a number of aspects. These are highlighted in this submission.

Importance of the effective protection of extractive

    resources and extractive industry operations in South

    East Queensland

Because modern communities use such large quantities of sand, gravel and crushed

    rock for buildings, road construction and other essential infrastructure, extractive

    resources play an important role in everyday community life.

However, extractive resources are high volume low cost materials and therefore, as

    transport is a major cost factor, extractive industry operations must be located close

    to the communities that use them if they are to be economically viable.

CEMENT CONCRETE AND AGGREGATES AUSTRALIA

    Submission Draft South East Queensland Regional Plan February 2005

     Page 3 of 7

    It is important to understand that Queensland requires in excess of 90,000 tonnes of

    extractive material per day to meet current demand and that extractive material use

    in this State equates to almost 10 tonnes per person per year. The latter has been

    the case since 1979.

Some examples of a modern community‟s use of extractive material are detailed at

    Annexure 1 as are the requirements for the redevelopment of the Brisbane Airport

    and the duplication of the Gateway Bridge.

The volume (in millions of tonnes) of the various extractive materials produced in

    South East Queensland in 2002-2003 is shown in the following table.

Crushed Road Broken River Unprocessed Natural Manufactured Total

    course base rock gravels construction sand sand

    aggregate material

    6.11 5.74 0.64 0.41 4.43 3.11 1.53 21.9

     Source - Department of Natural Resources and Mines

Over the past 20 years, increases in consumption of extractive resources correlate

    with population increases. Increases in population and consumption are predicted to

    continue.

However, extractive resources are limited in occurrence by geological conditions and

    are finite. Therefore, it is important to protect the availability of these resources for

    current and future use by the community.

The utilisation of extractive resources can be easily sterilised through the inappropriate

    development and use of premises over, or adjacent to, the land containing the

    resource or the associated transportation route, which restricts or prevents: -

    ? the efficient winning of the resource; or

    ? the effective distribution of materials to the market.

Further, as road haulage is generally the most economical and practicable means of

    distributing these extractive materials, the transportation routes from the resources to

    the major road networks must also be protected. One only has to look at the Narangba

    hardrock haulage issue to see the problems created when this does not occur.

CCAA believes that where extractive resources can be worked in an environmentally

    acceptable manner, the opportunity to access such resources must be protected. It

    believes that the draft regional plan must provide this protection and require other

    planning and policy instruments to do the same.

Regional plan must reinforce the State Planning Policy:

    Protection of Extractive Resources

CCAA believes that the proposed regional plan for South East Queensland must

    reinforce the State Government‟s position as enunciated in the draft State Planning

    Policy: Protection of Extractive Resources (SPP) and provide total protection for

    extractive resources, existing extractive industry operations and associated transport

    corridors.

CEMENT CONCRETE AND AGGREGATES AUSTRALIA

    Submission Draft South East Queensland Regional Plan February 2005

     Page 4 of 7

    This is particularly important in light of the projected population growth in the south

    east region and the resultant urban expansion envisaged over the period to 2021.

The SPP identifies a number of Key Resource Areas (KRAs) which include the

    resource deposit, a transport corridor and a separation area around both the deposit

    and the corridor.

    ? Map 4 Rural production and natural resources

The draft regional plan shows extractive resources within South East Queensland on

    Map 4 Rural production and natural resources.

However, the map does not include all of the KRAs that have been identified under

    the SPP. Nor does it show existing extractive operations which are not nominated as

    KRAs under the SPP.

This is of major concern to CCAA. Part A of the draft regional plan discusses the

    legislative framework under which the plan will have the force of law and the

    relationship between the draft plan and other planning instruments is described as

    follows:

    Under the enabling legislation, the Regional Plan prevails to the extent that there

    is any inconsistency, over any other plan, policy or code including any other

    planning instrument made under State legislation. However, the Regional Plan has

    been prepared to complement, rather than override, State planning instruments.”

CCAA requests that, to ensure the regional plan complements the SPP and all the

    region‟s extractive resources are effectively protected, all KRAs nominated under the SPP and all existing extractive operations in South East Queensland be identified on

    Map 4 Rural production and natural resources.

    ? Integrated transport Desired regional outcome 5

    In the discussion supporting Desired regional outcome 5, the draft regional plan lists the main transport plans and guidelines in south east Queensland. However, it is

    noted that the SPP is not included.

Given that the SPP details extractive industry transport routes, which represent an

    important component of the region‟s transport network, CCAA believes that the SPP must be included in the list of main transport plans and guidelines, currently listed on

    page 61 of the draft regional plan.

Further, CCAA considers that extractive industry transport routes should also be

    supported in the text of the draft regional plan through the inclusion of an additional

    principle and strategies addressing the issue in support of Desired regional outcome 5.

? Map 11 Transport infrastructure

To improve the degree to which the draft regional plan and the SPP can protect

    extractive industry transport routes, the CCAA believes that transport routes

    delineated under the SPP should be shown on Map 11 Transport infrastructure.

CEMENT CONCRETE AND AGGREGATES AUSTRALIA

    Submission Draft South East Queensland Regional Plan February 2005

     Page 5 of 7 Extractive industry outside the urban footprint

CCAA is concerned that a perception might develop within the community that once

    the areas for future urban development are identified the balance area will be open

    space or green belt.

It must be very clear under the draft regional plan that extractive industries can and

    will operate within the non-urban areas.

Furthermore, there is the issue of end land use. It must be recognised that

    notwithstanding that an extractive industry might be located outside the urban

    footprint the most appropriate end land use might be „Urban Purposes. For example

    the best end land use for quarries at Ferny Grove could be residential development.

I might be appropriate for all KRAs in South East Queensland to be included as part

    of the urban footprint. See also comments under the following heading “Extractive

    industry within the urban footprint”.

Extractive industry within the urban footprint

CCAA notes that the draft regional plan introduces the fundamental concept of

    „Urban Purposes‟ as a defined term. However, whilst the definition of urban purposes includes „industry‟, the draft regional plan is not clear as to whether the term „industry‟ also includes extractive industry operations.

CCAA believes that the draft regional plan must be clear that the term „Urban

    Purposes‟ does include extractive industry operations where those operations are

    situated within the urban footprint.

    If extractive industry is not included in the broader term „industry‟ within the definition of „Urban Purposes‟, then extractive industry, where located within the urban footprint,

    does not appear to be considered in the context of managing growth and is therefore

    not appropriately protected.

This is of major concern to CCAA as a number of extractive industry operations are

    already established within the urban footprint throughout the region.

Further, Part D of the draft regional plan discusses the structure of urban areas and

    sets strategic directions for the future of settlement patterns throughout the region.

    However, the plan does not acknowledge that extractive industry has been included

    within the urban footprint in certain locations.

This deficiency in the draft regional plan is of major concern to CCAA.

To ensure that extractive industry is protected from the encroachment of

    incompatible land use activities in instances where it is situated within the urban

    footprint, CCAA believes that Part D of the draft regional plan must acknowledge the

    fact that extractive industry has been included, and may continue to be established,

    in appropriate locations within the urban footprint.

CEMENT CONCRETE AND AGGREGATES AUSTRALIA

    Submission Draft South East Queensland Regional Plan February 2005

     Page 6 of 7

    Nature conservation

The draft regional plan indicates areas of environmental significance on Map 3

    Nature conservation. However, the draft plan fails to make clear the source of the

    data or the purpose and implications of the map.

CCAA believes that the draft regional plan should clearly state the source of the

    mapping and, more importantly, whether the designations shown on Map 3 Nature

    conservation, represent a regulatory layer in addition to the regional ecosystem, essential habitat and State wildlife corridor mapping undertaken by various State

    Government agencies pursuant to other legislation eg Vegetation Management Act 1999 and Nature Conservation Act 1992.

In the event that Map 3 Nature conservation does represent another layer of flora

    and fauna management, the draft regional plan should clearly state whether the

    designations and provisions made under the draft regional plan prevail over the

    designations and provisions made on the mapping prepared under the Vegetation Management Act 1999 and the Nature Conservation Act 1992.

This issue is of particular importance to CCAA members.

As indicated above it is noted that Part A of the draft regional plan states that under

    the enabling legislation, the Regional Plan prevails to the extent that there is any

    inconsistency, over any other plan, policy or code including any other planning

    instrument made under State legislation.

CCAA is concerned that whilst extractive resources might be protected from urban

    encroachment under the SPP the development of these resources may never occur

    (notwithstanding that operators may hold lawful development approvals) because of

    the current provisions of the Vegetation Management Act 1999 and the Regional Vegetation Management Codes for Ongoing Clearing Purposes developed pursuant

    to such legislation.

For example, the performance requirements of Part A of the Regional Vegetation

    Management Code for South East Queensland must be met and no other solutions are

    available. Performance Requirement A.5 provides that to prevent loss of biodiversity

    clearing for extractive industry is not to occur in an area which is identified on a map

    prepared by the chief executive officer of the agency which administers the Nature

    Conservation Act 1992 and certified for use for the purposes of the code by the chief

    executive of the Department of Natural Resources and Mines, as an area of essential

    habitat for a species of wildlife listed as vulnerable, rare, near threatened or

    endangered under that Act.

Further, Performance Requirement X.2 (which relates to Extractive Industry) provides

    that to prevent the loss of biodiversity and to maintain ecological processes, viable

    networks of wildlife habitat are maintained. The Acceptable Solutions state, amongst

    other things, that “Clearing does not occur in State Wildlife Corridors”.

The extractive industry has, in the main, acted in an environmentally responsible

    manner and cleared on site vegetation progressively. The result is that many quarry

    sites still contain substantial areas that are or have evolved into remnant native

    vegetation which have now been identified as either “essential habitat” or “State

CEMENT CONCRETE AND AGGREGATES AUSTRALIA

    Submission Draft South East Queensland Regional Plan February 2005

     Page 7 of 7

    Wildlife Corridor” or both. Refer to the attached map showing the impact of this on

    one of the most important KRAs in South East Queensland.

CCAA believes that extractive industry operators in South East Queensland must be

    able to clear vegetation on KRAs as designated under the SPP notwithstanding that

    such vegetation is part of an essential habitat or a State wildlife corridor and the

    CCAA will be arguing its case during the review of the vegetation codes announced

    by the Honourable Stephen Robertson MP, Minister for Natural Resources and

    Mines on 18 January 2005.

CCAA believes that the draft regional plan must reinforce this necessary access to

    the finite extractive resources in South East Queensland.

Conclusion

The ongoing availability of extractive resources in South East Queensland is critical if

    the Government‟s proposed infrastructure plan for this region is to be implemented

    successfully.

CCAA believes that the draft regional plan must be revised as outlined in this

    submission to ensure that, where extractive resources are identified pursuant

    to the draft State Planning Policy: Protection of Extractive Resources, they are

    fully protected from any other plan, policy or code made under State legislation

    and every opportunity is provided to access and develop such resources for

    the benefit of the community as a whole.

Further discussion

CCAA would welcome the opportunity to discuss any of the issues raised in this

    submission.

Contact with CCAA should be made through the Executive Officer, Extractive

    Industries Queensland as follows

Telephone: (07) 3886 1543

    Mobile: 0409 281 008

    Email: kengluch@bigpond.com

CEMENT CONCRETE AND AGGREGATES AUSTRALIA

    Submission Draft South East Queensland Regional Plan February 2005

    ANNEXURE 1

EXAMPLES OF A MODERN COMMUNITY’S USE OF EXTRACTIVE MATERIAL.

? 1 km of highway requires 25,000 tonnes of crushed rock.

    ? 1 km of suburban road requires

    ? 5000 tonnes of crushed rock;

    ? 750 tonnes of concrete for footpaths, kerbs and gutters; and

    ? 450 tonnes of asphalt for road surfacing.

? 1 km of railway requires 2,000 tonnes of ballast.

? A high rise building can use up to 1,000 tonnes of aggregate per floor.

? Construction of a typical house with driveway, landscaping etc uses about

    100 tonnes of aggregate.

? 1 cubic metre of concrete requires 2 tonnes of quarry material.

Redevelopment of Brisbane Airport

The proposed redevelopment of the Brisbane Airport including runway, taxiways, terminal

    buildings and aeronautical infrastructure will require between 1? and 2 million tonnes of

    extractive material including crushed rock for road base and specialised aggregates and

    sand for concrete and asphalt.

Every lineal metre of the new runway will require approximately 25 tonnes of extractive

    material.

The above figures do not include the 10 to 15 million tonnes of sand required for the runway

    pad.

Duplication of Gateway Bridge

    The proposed duplication of the Gateway Bridge will require 300,000 tonnes of specialised extractive material with high engineering values just for the basic bridge structure. This does not include the extractive material that will be required for the bridge

    approaches and associated road works.

CEMENT CONCRETE AND AGGREGATES AUSTRALIA

    Submission Draft South East Queensland Regional Plan January 2005

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