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COMBAT SEARCH AND RESCUE PROCEDURES

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COMBAT SEARCH AND RESCUE PROCEDURES

COMBAT SEARCH AND RESCUE PROCEDURES

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    Army Regulation 525-90

    AFR 64-3

    NWP 19-2

     COMBAT SEARCH AND RESCUE PROCEDURES

     25 February 1985

     Effective: 25 February 1985

     Unclassified

     PIN: 003323-000

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     1

    Summary of Changes

     This revision explains new terms:

    1. Combat Search and Rescue, Evasion Plans of Action, Objective Area, Rescue

    Coordination Center, and Selected Area for Evasion (para 2);

    2. deletes outdated or unnecessary terms: Aircrew Recovery, Ditch Post Mission,

    Ever-ready Missions, Joint Rescue Coordination Center, Removal Area, On Station,

    Search and Rescue, and Search and Rescue Coordination Center;

    3. defines responsibilities of Service component commanders (para 3c); clarifies

    coordination of CSAR operations (para 4);

    4. defines recovery methods (para 5a); explains new requirement for evasion plans of

    action (para 5(3));

    5. explains CSAR procedures including SARTF, unescorted penetration, and

    unconventional warfare (para 7);

    6. provides communication frequency source documents (para 8d); expands and clarifies

    authentication procedures (para 12); and

    7. provides a revised DD Form 1833, Isolated Personnel Report (ISOPREP).

     2

     Title Page

     History.

     Summary.

     This regulation prescribes combat search and rescue procedures approved by the Joint

    Chiefs of Staff.

    Applicability.

     It applies to all combat elements of the Armed Forces.

    Proponent and exception authority.

     Not applicable

     Army management control process.

     Not applicable

     Supplementation.

     Not applicable

     Suggested improvements.

     Not applicable

     Distribution.

     DISTRIBUTION:

     Air Force: F

     Army: To be distributed in accordance with DA Form 12-9A requirements for

     AR, Military Operations

     Active Army: A

     ARNG: D

     USAR: D

     Supersession.

     This pamphlet supersedes AFR 64-3/AR 525-90/NWP SUPP 37(B), 30 November

     1971.

     3

    Table of Contents

     CONTENTS Table of Contents

     COVER Book Cover

     CHANGES Change Summary

     TITLE-PAGE Title Page

     CONTENTS Table of Contents

     FIGURES Figures

     1.1 Objectives:

     1.2 Terms Explained:

     1.2.a Airborne Mission Commander (AMC).

     1.2.b Combat Search and Rescue (CSAR).

     1.2.c Component SAR Controller.

     1.2.d Evasion Plan of Action (EPA).

     1.2.e Life Guard.

     1.2.f Objective Area.

     1.2.g On Scene Commander (OSC).

     1.2.h Precautionary SAR.

     1.2.i Rescue Combat Air Patrol (RESCAP).

     1.2.j Rescue Escort (RESCORT).

     1.2.k Rescue Coordination Center (RCC).

     1.2.l SAR Coordinator.

     1.2.m SAR Mission Coordinator.

     1.2.n SAR Task Force (SARTF).

     1.2.o Selected Area for Evasion (SAFE).

     1.2.p Submarine Pickup Point.

     1.3 Responsibilities.

     1.3.a The Area Commander:

     1.3.b Adjacent Area Commanders.

     1.3.c Service Component

     1.3.d Unit Commanders Responsibilities:

     1.4 Coordination of CSAR Operations:

     1.5 General Concepts:

     1.5.a Recovery Methods.

     1.5.b Mission Preparation:

     1.5.c In-Flight Procedures:

     1.6 CSAR Concept of Operations.

     4

     1.6.a Search and Rescue Task Force (SARTF).

     1.6.b Unescorted Penetration.

     1.6.c Unconventional Warfare (UW) Forces.

     1.6.d Precautionary SAR in Support of Tactical Operations:

     1.6.e Strategic HFDF Nets.

     1.7 Effective Communications:

     1.8 In-Flight Emergency Communication.

     1.9 Communication Relay Support by Friendly Forces:

     1.10 Distress Signals:

     1.11 Authentication of Isolated Personnel.

     1.11.a Security.

     1.11.b Viability.

     1.12 Authentication System.

     1.12.a Unit Authentication.

     1.12.b Personal Authentication.

     1.12.c Local Authentication Codes.

     1.13 Use of the ISOPREP:

     1.14 Completing the ISOPREP.

     1.15 Authentication Procedures.

     1.16 Supply of Forms.

     1.0 Appendix 1. Attachment 1

     R-FORMS R-Forms

     FIGURES Figures

     A1-1. Arch 1.0

     A1-2. Tented Arch 1.0

     A1-3. Finger Loop-Left Hand 1.0

     A1-4. Thumb Loop-Left Hand 1.0

     A1-5. Whorl 1.0

     A1-6. Whorl 1.0

     A1-7. Whorl 1.0

     RF-1. Reproducible DA Form 1833 R-FORMS

     RF-2. Reproducible DA Form 1833 (reverse) R-FORMS

     5

    Objectives:

     1.1 Objectives:

    a. The objective of Search and Rescue (SAR) as described in the National Search and

    Rescue Manual is to aid persons and property in distress. This objective reaches

    the pinnacle of importance in its application to combat SAR (CSAR). The hazards of

    the wartime environment dictate that CSAR forces must be specifically equipped,

    trained, and organized for the wartime mission.

    b. The objective of CSAR is to effectively employ all available resources to recover

    distressed personnel in a wartime or contingency environment. Thus, we preserve

    and return to duty critical manpower resources of the United States, deny the enemy

    a source of intelligence information, and contribute to the morale and mission

    motivation of the combat forces.

    Terms Explained:

     1.2 Terms Explained:

     Subtopics

     1.2.a Airborne Mission Commander (AMC).

     1.2.b Combat Search and Rescue (CSAR).

     1.2.c Component SAR Controller.

     1.2.d Evasion Plan of Action (EPA).

     1.2.e Life Guard.

     1.2.f Objective Area.

     1.2.g On Scene Commander (OSC).

     1.2.h Precautionary SAR.

     1.2.i Rescue Combat Air Patrol (RESCAP).

     1.2.j Rescue Escort (RESCORT).

     1.2.k Rescue Coordination Center (RCC).

     1.2.l SAR Coordinator.

     1.2.m SAR Mission Coordinator.

     1.2.n SAR Task Force (SARTF).

     1.2.o Selected Area for Evasion (SAFE).

     1.2.p Submarine Pickup Point.

     6

    Airborne Mission Commander (AMC).

     1.2.A Airborne Mission Commander (AMC).

    a. Airborne Mission Commander (AMC). A designated airborne representative of

    the controlling Rescue Coordination Center (RCC) who exercises overall control and

    coordination of CSAR mission activity in a designated area.

    Combat Search and Rescue (CSAR).

     1.2.B Combat Search and Rescue (CSAR).

    b. Combat Search and Rescue (CSAR). A specialized task performed by rescue

    forces to effect the recovery of distressed personnel during wartime or contingency

    operations.

    Component SAR Controller.

     1.2.C Component SAR Controller.

    c. Component SAR Controller. The designated SAR representative of a component

    commander of a unified command who is responsible in the name of his or her

    component commander for the control of component SAR forces committed to joint

    SAR operations.

    Evasion Plan of Action (EPA).

     1.2.D Evasion Plan of Action (EPA).

    d. Evasion Plan of Action (EPA). A course of action, developed prior to executing a

    combat mission, which is intended to improve a potential evader's chances for

    successful evasion and recovery by providing an additional source of information for

    CSAR forces, thereby increasing the predictability of the evader.

     Life Guard.

     1.2.E Life Guard.

    e. Life Guard. A submarine or surface ship designated for SAR or precautionary SAR

    assistance.

     Objective Area.

     7

     1.2.F Objective Area.

    f. Objective Area. A defined geographical area in which a military objective lies. This

    area is defined by component authority for purposes of command and control. For

    CSAR purposes, the objective area is defined as the area within 1 kilometer radius of

    a CSAR objective.

    On Scene Commander (OSC).

     1.2.G On Scene Commander (OSC).

    g. On Scene Commander (OSC). The person designated to coordinate the rescue

    efforts in and incident to the objective area.

    Precautionary SAR.

     1.2.H Precautionary SAR.

    h. Precautionary SAR. The planning and propositioning of aircraft, ships, or ground

    facilities prior to an operation to provide SAR assistance if needed.

    Rescue Combat Air Patrol (RESCAP).

     1.2.I Rescue Combat Air Patrol (RESCAP).

    i. Rescue Combat Air Patrol (RESCAP). An aircraft patrol provided over a CSAR

    objective area for the purpose of intercepting and destroying hostile aircraft before

    they reach the area. Its primary mission is to protect the SAR Task Force during

    recovery operations.

    Rescue Escort (RESCORT).

     1.2.J Rescue Escort (RESCORT).

    j. Rescue Escort (RESCORT). Aircraft designated to protect rescue vehicles from

    possible hostile action while en route to and from the CSAR objective area and

    during the recovery phase.

    Rescue Coordination Center (RCC).

     1.2.K Rescue Coordination Center (RCC).

    k. Rescue Coordination Center (RCC). A primary SAR facility suitable staffed by

    supervisory personnel and equipped for coordinating and controlling SAR operations.

     8

    The facility may be operated unilaterally by personnel of a single service (RCC),

    jointly by personnel of two or more services (JRCC), or it may have a combine staff

    of personnel from two or more allied nations (CRCC).

    SAR Coordinator.

     1.2.L SAR Coordinator.

    l. SAR Coordinator. The designated SAR representative of the area commander, with

    overall responsibility and authority for operation of the JRCC, and for joint SAR

    operations within the assigned geographical area.

    SAR Mission Coordinator.

     1.2.M SAR Mission Coordinator.

    m. SAR Mission Coordinator. A SAR controller selected by the SAR coordinator to

    direct a specific mission.

    SAR Task Force (SARTF).

     1.2.N SAR Task Force (SARTF).

    n. SAR Task Force (SARTF). All forces committed to a SAR operation to search for,

    locate and rescue personnel, including those elements assigned to protect the rescue

    vehicles from enemy interdiction.

    Selected Area for Evasion (SAFE).

     1.2.O Selected Area for Evasion (SAFE).

    o. Selected Area for Evasion (SAFE). A designated area in hostile territory which

    offers the evader or escapee a reasonable chance of avoiding capture and of surviving

    until he or she can be evacuated.

    Submarine Pickup Point.

     1.2.P Submarine Pickup Point.

    p. Submarine Pickup Point. A designated point in enemy controlled waters for

    planned CSAR surveillance.

     9

    Responsibilities.

     1.3 Responsibilities.

     (See JCS Publication 2, Chapter 4, Section 4.)

     Subtopics

     1.3.a The Area Commander:

     1.3.b Adjacent Area Commanders.

     1.3.c Service Component

     1.3.d Unit Commanders Responsibilities:

    The Area Commander:

     1.3.A The Area Commander:

     a. The Area Commander:

    (1) Has primary authority and responsibility for CSAR in support of US forces within

    his or her area.

    (2) Will develop and publish supplemental CSAR procedures for his or her area of

    responsibility.

    (3) May delegate SAR authority to subordinate commanders and, by mutual

    agreement, to military commanders of other commands, including the Coast Guard.

    The area commander usually designates the Air Force Component Commander

    (COMAFFOR) as the area SAR coordinator, who in turn delegates the authority to

    the Commander of Aerospace Rescue and Recovery Forces (COMARRF).

    (4) Will establish an RCC to direct and coordinate all CSAR operations within his or

    her area of responsibility. Provisions will be made for all Services concerned to

    actively participate in the RCC. Each Service will provide sufficient personnel to

    ensure adequate staffing of the component SAR Controller position.

    (5) Will exercise control, through his or her component commanders, of forces

    committed to CSAR operations. Component commanders will normally exercise

    control of CSAR forces through their component SAR controller.

    (6) May assign CSAR tasks and missions to forces not assigned but based or operating

    in his or her area. Control will normally remain with the commanders of such

    forces, who will keep the area commander advised of the availability of their

    assigned SAR assets. The area commander may assume temporary operational

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