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Intergovernmental

By Pauline Ross,2014-11-07 13:54
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Intergovernmental

     Department of Health and Human Services

    Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration

    Center for Substance Abuse Treatment

    Projects to Deliver and Evaluate

    Peer-to-Peer Recovery Support Services

    Short Title: Recovery Community Services Program RCSP

    (Initial Announcement)

    Request for Applications (RFA) No. TI-06-004

Catalogue of Federal Domestic Assistance (CFDA) No.: 93.243

    Key Dates:

Application Deadline April 4, 2006

    Intergovernmental Review Letters from State Single Point of Contact (SPOC) are due no (E.O. 12372) later than 60 days after application deadline.

    Public Health System Impact Applicants must send the PHSIS to appropriate State and local Statement (PHSIS)/Single health agencies by application deadline. Comments from Single

    State Agency Coordination State Agency are due no later than 60 days after application

    deadline.

     _________________________________

    H. Westley Clark, M.D., J.D., M.P.H., CAS, FASAM Charles G. Curie, M.A., A.C.S.W.

    Director, Center for Substance Abuse Treatment Administrator Substance Abuse and Mental Health Substance Abuse and Mental Health

     Services Administration Services Administration

    Table of Contents

    I. FUNDING OPPORTUNITY DESCRIPTION .....................................................................3 1. INTRODUCTION ...........................................................................................................3 2. EXPECTATIONS ...........................................................................................................3 II. AWARD INFORMATION .................................................................................................9 1. AWARD AMOUNT........................................................................................................9 2. FUNDING MECHANISM ..............................................................................................9 III. ELIGIBILITY INFORMATION .........................................................................................9 1. ELIGIBLE APPLICANTS ..............................................................................................9 2. COST-SHARING .......................................................................................................... 10 3. OTHER ......................................................................................................................... 10

    IV. APPLICATION AND SUBMISSION INFORMATION ................................................... 11 1. ADDRESS TO REQUEST APPLICATION PACKAGE ............................................... 11

    2. CONTENT AND FORM OF APPLICATION SUBMISSION....................................... 11

    3. SUBMISSION DATES AND TIMES ........................................................................... 17 4. INTERGOVERNMENTAL REVIEW (E.O. 12372) REQUIREMENTS ....................... 18

    5. FUNDING LIMITATIONS/RESTRICTIONS ............................................................... 20 6. OTHER SUBMISSION REQUIREMENTS .................................................................. 22 V. APPLICATION REVIEW INFORMATION ..................................................................... 23 1. EVALUATION CRITERIA .......................................................................................... 23 2. REVIEW AND SELECTION PROCESS ...................................................................... 32 VI. AWARD ADMINISTRATION INFORMATION ............................................................. 32 1. AWARD NOTICES ...................................................................................................... 32 2. ADMINISTRATIVE AND NATIONAL POLICY REQUIREMENTS ......................... 33

    3. REPORTING REQUIREMENTS .................................................................................. 33 VII. AGENCY CONTACTS .................................................................................................... 35 APPENDIX A: LISTING OF CURRENT ACCESS TO RECOVERY (ATR) GRANTS ......... 36

    APPENDIX B: REFERENCES CITED.................................................................................... 42 APPENDIX C: PEER-TO-PEER RECOVERY SUPPORT SERVICES EXAMPLES.............. 43

    APPENDIX D: CHECKLIST FOR FORMATTING REQUIREMENTS AND SCREENOUT

    CRITERIA FOR SAMHSA GRANT APPLICATIONS ............................................................ 46 APPENDIX E: CORE VALUES FOR RCSP PEER-TO-PEER RECOVERY SUPPORT

    SERVICES ............................................................................................................................... 48

    APPENDIX F: SAMPLE CONSENT FORM FOR PARTICIPATION IN PEER-TO-PEER

    RECOVERY SUPPORT SERVICES ........................................................................................ 49 APPENDIX G: ANALYSIS OF EXAMPLES OF RISKS AND PROTECTIONS FOR PEER

    RECOVERY SUPPORT SERVICES ........................................................................................ 51 APPENDIX H: ADDITIONAL CONSIDERATION: PEER VS. PROFESSIONAL SUPPORT

    SERVICES ............................................................................................................................... 54

    APPENDIX I: GLOSSARY ..................................................................................................... 55 APPENDIX J: STATEMENT OF ASSURANCE .................................................................... 56 APPENDIX K: SAMPLE RCSP BUDGET .............................................................................. 57

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I. FUNDING OPPORTUNITY DESCRIPTION

1. INTRODUCTION

    The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), Center for Substance Abuse Treatment (CSAT) announces the availability of FY 2006 funds for grants to

    deliver and evaluate peer-to-peer recovery support services that help prevent relapse and

    promote sustained recovery from alcohol and drug use disorders. Successful applicants will provide peer-to-peer recovery support services that are responsive to community needs and strengths, and will carry out a quantitative and qualitative evaluation of the services. Recovery Community Services Program (RCSP) grants are authorized under section 509 of the Public Health Service Act, as amended. This announcement addresses Healthy People 2010 focus area 26 (Substance Abuse).

    This Recovery Community Services Program complements SAMHSA’s Access to Recovery (ATR) program. ATR provides grant funding to States, Territories, and Tribal Organizations to implement voucher programs for substance abuse clinical treatment and recovery support services pursuant to sections 501(d)(5) and 509 of the Public Health Service Act (42 U.S.C. sections 290aa(d)(5) and 290bb-2). ATR is part of a major Presidential Initiative to provide client choice among substance abuse clinical treatment and recovery support service providers, expand access to a comprehensive array of clinical treatment and recovery support options (including faith-based programmatic options), and increase substance abuse treatment capacity.

    If you are applying for an RCSP grant and you are from a State that currently has a SAMHSA-funded ATR program, you must discuss in your application how you propose to link your RCSP project with the ATR program in your State. This is to ensure that RCSP applications complement the ATR program. (Note: Appendix A includes a listing of current ATR grantees

    and descriptions of the projects.)

2. EXPECTATIONS

2.1 Target/Involved Population

    The primary target for this program is people with a history of alcohol and/or drug problems who are in or seeking recovery, along with their family members and significant others, who will be both the providers and recipients of recovery support services. For purposes of this document, the term peer means people who share the experience of addiction and recovery, either directly or as family members/significant others.

2.2 Eligible Services

    Peer-to-peer recovery support services are designed and delivered by peers rather than by professionals. Professionals will be good allies, and successful peer initiatives will network and build strong and mutually supportive relationships with formal systems and professionals in their communities. However, peer services will be designed and delivered primarily by individuals in recovery to meet the targeted community’s recovery support needs, as the community defines

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    them. Therefore, although supportive of formal treatment, peer recovery support services are not treatment in the commonly understood clinical sense of the term.

    At the same time, peer recovery support services are expected to extend and enhance the treatment continuum in at least two ways. These services will help prevent relapse and promote long-term recovery, thereby reducing the strain on the over-burdened treatment system. Moreover, when individuals do experience relapse, recovery support services can help minimize the negative effects through early intervention and, where appropriate, timely referral to treatment.

    Continued sobriety or abstinence (which includes abstinence attained with medication, such as methadone or buprenorphine) is an important part of sustained recovery from addiction. However, recovery is a larger construct than sobriety or abstinence that embraces a reengagement with the community based on resilience, health, and hope. Therefore, peer recovery support services are expected to focus less on the pathology of substance use disorders and more on maximizing the opportunities to create a lifetime of recovery and wellness for self, family, and community. Appendix C provides a listing of examples of peer-to-peer recovery

    support services.

    This grant program is not designed to support the provision of professional treatment services of any kind, including aftercare, by any type of provider. Peer support services

    cannot replace acute treatment, and it would be unethical to utilize peer leaders from the recovery community to provide services, such as treatment, counseling, or psychotherapy, that should be provided by a professional. Peer leaders providing recovery support services under this program will offer supportive services that differ from and complement those provided by alcohol and drug counselors, psychotherapists, or other professionals.

    In addition, the program is not designed to support counselors, psychotherapists, other treatment providers, or other professionals of any kind in the provision of recovery support services. Individuals who self-identify as both a professional and a person in recovery may provide recovery support services in their capacity as a peer, but may not provide professional services under this grant.

    RCSP is intended to support peer leaders from the recovery community in providing recovery support services to people in recovery and their family members.

2.3 Mix of Services

    Applicants must demonstrate that the array of services offered is responsive to community need and complements existing community resources. Applications proposing culturally-specific peer recovery support models are welcome, as are applications proposing to serve specific populations needing or in recovery, such as veterans, people with disabilities, and other segments of the recovery community. The goal is to add to the existing resources in the community with peer-to-peer recovery support services that can meet the stage-appropriate needs of people who are seeking to initiate recovery or working to sustain it. Successful peer-to-peer recovery

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    support services will include ongoing assessment of participants’ support needs and a menu of supportive services to meet the needs at various stages in recovery.

    Because peer recovery support services operationalize the construct of social support, it may be helpful for applicants to consider four types of social support cited in the literature (Cobb, 1976; Salser, 2002), and to design a mix of services that includes activities in the following categories:

    ; Emotional support refers to demonstrations of empathy, caring, and concern that bolster

    one’s self-esteem and confidence. Peer mentoring, peer coaching, and peer-led support

    groups are examples of peer-to-peer recovery support services that provide emotional support.

    ; Informational support involves assistance with knowledge, information, and skills. This type

    of support can include providing information on where to go for resources or might involve

    teaching a specific skill. Examples of peer recovery support services that provide

    informational support include peer-led life skills training (e.g., parenting, stress management,

    conflict resolution), job skills training, citizenship restoration, educational assistance, and

    health and wellness information (e.g., smoking cessation, nutrition, relaxation training).

    ; Instrumental support refers to concrete assistance in helping others do things or get things

    done, especially stressful or unpleasant tasks. Examples in this category might include

    providing transportation to get to support groups, child-care, clothing closets, and concrete

    assistance with tasks such as filling out applications or helping people obtain entitlements.

    ; Affiliational support offers the opportunity to establish positive social connections with other

    recovering people. It is important for people in recovery to learn social and recreational

    skills in an alcohol- and drug-free environment. Especially in early recovery when there

    may be little that is reinforcing about abstaining from alcohol or drugs alcohol- and drug-

    free socialization may help prevent relapse [Meyers & Squires, 2001; Miller, Meyers &

    Hiller-Sturmhofel, 1999). In addition, community and cultural connections can be important

    in helping the recovering person establish a new identity around health and wellness as

    opposed to an identity formed in relation to the cultures of alcohol and drugs (Coyhis, 2002).