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Control Measure Summary-Auto Refinishing-

By Elizabeth Bell,2014-08-09 01:35
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Control Measure Summary-Auto Refinishing-

NOTE: The measures discussed in this document represent possible controls the OTC is evaluating for

    potential NOx and VOC emission reductions. No decision has yet been made by the OTC states to pursue

    these measures for inclusion in a state implementation plan.

Summary of OTC Candidate Control Measures Auto Refinishing Coatings

    Date: March 29, 2006 Revised January 7, 2009

    CONTROL MEASURE SUMMARY FOR

    Auto Refinish Coatings Area Source

    Control Measure Summary: Limiting the concentration of solvents in Emissions (tons/year) in Ozone

    Auto Refinishing Coatings in order to reduce VOC emissions. Transport Region

    Encourage the use of high transfer-efficiency painting methods (e.g.,

    high volume low pressure spray guns), and controls on emissions from

    equipment (e.g., spray gun) cleaning, housekeeping activities (e.g., use

    of sealed containers for clean-up rags), and operator training.

    2002 existing measure: Federal Auto Body Refinishing rules 40CFR

    Part 59 Subpart B

    Emission Reductions: 37% reduction from Part 59 (from Pechan OTC VOC

    Model Rule Report) due to Part 59 VOC content limits Uncontrolled: 50,759

    Control Cost: $118 per ton for Part 59 rules 2002 Reduction: -18,781

    Timing of Implementation: Part 59 compliance required by January 2002 Base: 31,978

    1999

    Implementation Area: Part 59 Nationwide;

    OTB Control Measure: OTC Model Rule for Mobile Equipment

    Repair and Refinishing

    Emission Reductions: 38% reduction from 2002 Levels in those States

    that adopted OTC model Rule (per Pechan March 31, 2001 OTC VOC:

    Model Rule Report) 2009 Reduction: -10,468

    Control Cost: $1,534 per ton of VOC 2009 Remaining: 21,510

    Timing of Implementation: Assuming 2007 effective date of rule,

    emission reductions are achieved 01/01/09.

    Implementation Area: All counties in the OTR.

    Candidate measure: CARB October 20, 2005 SCM Staff Report

    Lowers VOC limits, combines coatings categories, simplifies

    recording.

    Emission Reductions: CARB estimates a 65% reduction in VOC VOC: emissions from a 2002 baseline; the OTC model rule is very similar to -13,981 2009 Reduction: the CARB 2002 baseline, so a similar reduction would be expected in 7,529 2009 Remaining: the OTR.

    Control Cost: $2,860 per ton

    Timing of Implementation: TBD.

    Implementation Area: All counties in the OTR.

    Policy Recommendation of State/Workgroup Lead: The SCAQMD adopted the CARB SCM on December 2, 2005. Other California districts are expected to adopt the SCM in 2006. Environment Canada is also

    creating a rule based on the same CARB limits. The OTC should develop a model rule based on the 2005

    CARB SCM in conjunction with Environment Canada to be presented at the June OTC meeting.

    Brief Rationale for Recommended Strategy: After implementing the OTC model regulation with its requirements for use of spray gun technology with high transfer efficiency and enclosed spray gun cleaners,

    the next most effective strategy is to significantly reduce the VOC content of the coatings.

    Next Steps: Define the categories of finish coatings that are being examined. Define the extent of controls on paints versus controls on shop exhaust systems.

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    NOTE: The measures discussed in this document represent possible controls the OTC is evaluating for potential NOx and VOC emission reductions. No decision has yet been made by the OTC states to pursue these measures for inclusion in a state implementation plan.

Summary of OTC Candidate Control Measures Auto Refinishing Coatings

    Date: March 29, 2006 Revised January 7, 2009

REFERENCES:

2002 Existing Measure (Federal Part 59 Rules):

    E.H. Pechan & Associates, Inc., AirControlNET Version 4.1: Documentation Report, September 2005.

    Pages III-1364 shows the Federal Part 59 rule at a cost of $118 per ton (1990$) and a reduction of 37

    percent from uncontrolled levels.

2009 On-the-Books Measure (OTC Model Rule):

    E.H. Pechan & Associates, Inc., Control Measure Development Support Analysis of Ozone Transport

    Commission Model Rules, March 31, 2001. Table II-6 shows 37% reduction for Federal Part 59 rule

    and 38% (OTC Model Rule beyond Federal rule). Page 17 presents cost of $1,534 per ton based on

    estimates used for PA Rule 129.75.

Candidate Measure (CARB 2005 Suggested Control Measure):

    California Air Resources Board. Staff Report for the Proposed Suggested Control Measure for

    Automotive Coatings. October 2005. Table V-3 shows the estimated 65% reduction from 2002

    baseline emissions for new automotive coatings limits. A similar reduction is expected for the OTR.

    Page VII-6 indicates that the cost-effectiveness of the SCM is estimated to be $1.43 per pound of VOC

    reduced ($2,860 per ton). The CARB SCM coating categories and VOC limits are:

     The OTC 2002 Model Rule coating categories and VOC limits are:

    OTC Model Rule Limit

    Coating Type Grams per Pounds per

    Liter gallon

    Automotive pretreatment primer 780 6.5

    Automotive primer-surfacer 575 4.8

    Automotive primer-sealer 550 4.6

    Automotive topcoat:

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    NOTE: The measures discussed in this document represent possible controls the OTC is evaluating for potential NOx and VOC emission reductions. No decision has yet been made by the OTC states to pursue these measures for inclusion in a state implementation plan.

Summary of OTC Candidate Control Measures Auto Refinishing Coatings

    Date: March 29, 2006 Revised January 7, 2009

    single stage-topcoat 600 5.0

    2 stage basecoat/clearcoat 600 5.0

    3 or 4-stage basecoat/clearcoat 625 5.2

    Automotive Multi-colored Topcoat 680 5.7

    Automotive specialty 840 7.0

Stakeholder Comment Summary:

    Since most auto body shops use solvent-borne coating technology, regulatory agencies must take into account the fact that the end users require additional training to be able to apply low VOC-content and water-borne coating products successfully. The use of water-borne technology involves the updating of current spray booths and ovens…this may lead to long lead-in time for equipment upgrades.

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