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1940 Arlington Citizen

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1940 Arlington Citizen

     The ARLINGTON CITIZEN, Arlington, Texas. 1940

    Thursday January 4 (The TARRANT COUNTY CITIZEN)

     Woman Drops Dead At Funeral Of Son

     Overcome with grief, Mrs. Sarah Martha Fitz-Charles, 75, collapsed at the conclusion

    of her son‘s funeral at Shannon‘s North Side Chapel in Fort Worth, Monday afternoon, and

    died before an ambulance could get her to a hospital.

     Justice of the Peace Brown said the woman, a resident of the Eastern Star Home, died in the same fashion as her son, George William Fitz-Charles, 52, who was stricken with a

    heart attack Sunday morning at his home 2303 Ellis Avenue. Brown conducted both inquests.

     Mrs. Fitz-Charles had entered a funeral home automobile with other relatives of her son, and was preparing to leave for the cemetery when she slumped over. She was taken inside and given first aid, then rushed to a hospital.

     The relatives told Mrs. Brown, Mrs. Fitz-Charles had complained earlier in the day. Friends at the Eastern Star Home said she had high blood pressure and had been in failing health. They said the son‘s death was ―too much for her.‖

     Survivors include another son, Wilbur Fitz-Charles of Ponca City, Okla., a brother Bob Johnson, and sister, Mrs. Jennie George, both of Atchison, Kan.

     Mrs. Fitz-Charles had lived at the home since 1932.

     The body was at the Eastern Star chapel from 9 until 10 a.m. Wednesday, when funeral services were conducted by Rev. Wayne Alliston, pastor of Turner Memorial Baptist Church, Fort Worth. Burial was in the Masonic Cemetery at Arlington.

Thursday January 4 (The TARRANT COUNTY CITIZEN)

     Robert Glover Dies In A Dallas Hospital Sat.

     Friends in Arlington were grieved to hear of the death of Robert Glover, the oldest son

    of Mr. and Mrs. Joe Glover. He died in a Dallas hospital Saturday afternoon about five o‘clock. He became ill Friday morning and was carried to the hospital Saturday morning suffering with pneumonia.

     Funeral services were held Monday with burial following in a Dallas cemetery.

     Robert, with his parents, formerly resided in Arlington and he sent Christmas cards to many of his little friends here. Robert was a fine manly little fellow and always assumed charge of his smaller brothers when they were away from home. His mother depended on him and he was worthy of his trust. He was sincere in his school work, but during play time he was a joyous companion and his school mates loved to be with him. Everyone loved Robert and his untimely passing was a great shock and grief to the people who knew him in Arlington.

Thursday January 4 (The TARRANT COUNTY CITIZEN)

     P. W. Williams Dies After Long Illness

     P. W. Williams, 84, died Monday night at his home in Handley after a long illness. Funeral services were held Tuesday at 2:00 p.m. at Moore Funeral Chapel in Handley. Burial was in the Johnson Station Cemetery with the Moore Funeral Home in charge.

Thursday January 4 (The TARRANT COUNTY CITIZEN)

     J. H. Lawler Dies Thursday Morning

     J. H. Lawler, 80, died Thursday morning at his home in Handley, following a short illness. Survivors are his widow; three sons, D. E., Dallas; H. H., San Antonio; and W. P. Lawler, Fort Worth; one sister, Miss Julia Lawler, Dallas.

     Funeral services will be held at the Moore Funeral Chapel in Handley Friday at 2:30 p.m. with Rev. Fenton of Handley officiating. Burial will be in Rose Hill with the Moore Funeral Home in charge.

Thursday January 4 (The TARRANT COUNTY CITIZEN)

     Robert Edward Lee Dies Here After Short Illness

     Robert Edward Lee, 68, died at the home of his daughter, Mrs. R. V. Fayle Monday night following a short illness. Mr. Lee moved to Arlington a short time ago from Dallas, where

     The ARLINGTON CITIZEN, Arlington, Texas. 1940

    he had lived for the past forty years. He was an employee of the Dallas Post Office for 30 years, retiring in 1933. He was a member of N.O.P.O.C. of Dallas and of the Oak Cliff Christian Church.

     He is survived by his widow, Mable Anna Lee; one daughter, Mrs. Mary Karger, Dallas; one son, Jesse E. Lee, Dallas; four step daughters, Mrs. Tom Stratton, Angelton; Mrs. J. R. Read, Atlanta, Ga.; Mrs. Mildred Carter, Shreveport, La.; Mrs. R. V. Fayle, Arlington; two grandchildren; and two sisters, Mrs. Robert Swor, Houston and Mrs. Charles Dietz, Dallas.

     Funeral services were held at the Luttrell Chapel Wednesday at 10:00 a.m. with Rev. A. W. Hall officiating. Burial was in Laurel Land, Dallas, with the Luttrell Funeral Home in charge.

Thursday January 4 (The TARRANT COUNTY CITIZEN)

     Father Dies

     J. H. Hindmarch received word Sunday of the death of his father in Mobile, Ala. Mr. Hindmarch was called to the bedside of his father some ten days prior to his death and was unable to make a second trip to attend the funeral.

Thursday January 4 (The TARRANT COUNTY CITIZEN)

     Kennedale Woman Is Fatally Burned Tues.

     Mrs. Vera Piott, 29, of Kennedale, was fatally burned at 4 p.m. Tuesday when her clothing caught fire from a wood stove at the residence.

     Taken to a Fort Worth hospital in a private car, she died at 12:15 a.m. Wednesday from burns all over her body.

     Mrs. Nick Poulos, a neighbor, was attracted by Mrs. Piott‘s screams for help and found

    her in flames in the yard. Mrs. Poulos jerked the burning clothes from Mrs. Piott‘s body.

     The burned woman said her housecoat became ignited while she was ―poking‖ the fire.

     Virgil Piott, her husband, learned of the accident several hours later when he returned from work in Fort Worth.

Thursday January 4 (The TARRANT COUNTY CITIZEN)

     RIFLE BALLS By E. G. Senter

     Whether Kaffa or Kahwa, Kophe. Kaffe, or Coffee, whether it puts one to sleep or makes one as wide awake as a sentry on post, the fact remains that had not the Turkish soldiers, in their retreat from Vienna in 1683 left behind their stores of coffee beans, this present universal beverage may have remained unknown in Europe and this country for a long time.

     News from DeBray Beach, Fla., of the death of Hickman Price, noted agriculturist,

    lecturer and one-time largest individual wheat raiser in the world, will be a shock to numerous of his friends in many parts of Texas. Mr. Price aroused nation-wide interest with his spectacular methods of large-scale wheat tillage on some 20,000 acres near Plainview and scattered through other Panhandle counties of Northern Texas back in 1929, when he came from the East and developed his wife‘s holdings which previously had been in grass. Though Mr. Price was only 53 at the time of his death, he had lived a busy and colorful life, graduating from Columbia University in 1909 and becoming a reporter on the New York Sun.

     The former German Kaiser, addressing a Christmas prayer service at Doorn stressed the significance of the Christmas festival to the world, especially in times of war, but carefully avoided any further mention of the present conflict. Nearly 81 years of age, the former Kaiser was an impressive figure, with snow-white hair and beard as he faced some sixty people of his suite and those employed at the castle. Wilhelm, as usual, ate and drank sparingly.

Thursday January 11 (The TARRANT COUNTY CITIZEN)

     Miss Evelyn Willis Is Instantly Killed

     Miss Evelyn Willis of Fort Worth was instantly killed Tuesday morning when the

    motorcycle on which she was riding, collided with a car on the highway just West of Arlington. Miss Willis was operating the motorcycle on which was riding N. L. Browning also of Fort Worth. He is reported in a serious condition in City County Hospital.

     The ARLINGTON CITIZEN, Arlington, Texas. 1940

     Miss Willis, going east, rammed the back of the car occupied by Mr. and Mrs. Henry D. Young also going east. After striking the car the motorcycle ran across the highway in front of the car going east, driven by Mrs. Edith Galloway of Fort Worth. The fender of the Young car was torn loose from back to front. Occupants of the two cars were uninjured.

     Funeral services for Miss Willis, 27, were conducted Wednesday at 2:30 p.m. at the Moore Funeral Chapel in Arlington. Rev. Gilbert Dalton officiated and burial was in Parkdale Cemetery. Miss Willis is survived by her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Sam Willis, Stephenville, five brothers and four sisters.

Thursday January 18 (The TARRANT COUNTY CITIZEN)

     THE CITIZEN CHANGES

     With this issue of The Citizen, we desire to make an important announcement concerning a change of ownership, management and policy. The paper is now owned and edited by Lowell H. Wheeler, junior member of the partnership known as Tarrant County Publications. A. H. Wheeler, founder and former editor and publisher, is entirely out of the picture, having disposed of his interests, including the commercial printing department, to his son.

     No important changes as to policy are contemplated at present except that editorials written by A. H. Wheeler will not be used in the future. For the information of those who might like to know, if any, the former editor is devoting all of his time to the editing and publishing of his statewide general and political newspaper, The Texas Citizen, and that is quite a job.

     The Arlington Citizen and The Tarrant County Citizen are well in their sixth year of existence and we feel that they have been a fair degree of success. We feel sure that this change in ownership and management will be a decided aid to the further success of the papers.

     Lowell Wheeler is well known in Arlington having devoted two years of his life as a student at N.T.A.C., during which time he formed the acquaintance and friendship of many people in Arlington. Since then he has lived in Arlington for about six and one-half years, has married and he and Mrs. Wheeler have a three-month old baby daughter.

     This is his first business venture ―on his own‖ and he is anxious to see how his friends are to take it, hoping of course, that they will continue to give the paper their hearty support and help make the kind of a paper the city and community ought to have.

     With these words of explanation, we begin what we hope is a long and successful career in your city and county.

Thursday January 18 (The TARRANT COUNTY CITIZEN)

     Mrs. Tate’s Mother Is Called By Death

     Mrs. Jake Tate received word Tuesday of the death of her mother in Tulsa, Okla. She left at once and her daughters, Misses Lucile and Bessie J. went Wednesday. No particulars were given in the message but friends report death followed an illness of some time.

Thursday January 18 (The TARRANT COUNTY CITIZEN)

     Mrs. P. D. Yarborough’s Brother Dies Saturday

     Mrs. P. D. Yarborough‘s brother, Jack Dean, 55, died at his residence in Sarepta, La.,

    last Saturday at 7:10 p.m.

     Survived are his widow, five brothers and two sisters.

     On account of Mr. Yarborough‘s illness, Mrs. Yarborough was unable to attend his funeral which was held at his home in Sarepta.

Thursday January 18 (The TARRANT COUNTY CITIZEN)

     Delmar Pachl’s Mother Passes Away Thursday

     Mrs. M. F. Pachl, mother of Delmar Pachl, art instructor at NTAC, died at her home in Springfield, Missouri, Thursday.

     Pachl left for Springfield Thursday night and returned to Arlington Monday.

     The ARLINGTON CITIZEN, Arlington, Texas. 1940

Thursday January 25 (The TARRANT COUNTY CITIZEN)

     Funeral Services Held For Geo. W. Sanders

     George W. Sanders, 73, a resident of Arlington for 65 years, died at his home here Wednesday.

     Mr. Sanders, a building contractor, came to Arlington with his parents from his parents from his birthplace in Alaboma (Alabama?).

     Surviving are his widow; three daughters, Mrs. George Cribbs, Mrs. Roy Smith, and Mrs. Fletcher Robbins, all of Arlington; and two grandchildren.

     Funeral services were conducted at the Moore Funeral Home Thursday at 4:30 p.m. with Rev. J. H. Patterson officiating. Burial was in Noah Cemetery.

Thursday January 25 (The TARRANT COUNTY CITIZEN)

     Mrs. J. T. Peters Buried At Arlington Sunday

     Funeral services were held here Sunday at 2 p.m. for Mrs. J. T. Peters, former resident

    of Arlington, who died in Longview Friday night.

     She had lived her entire life in Arlington until five years ago when she moved to Longview with her husband an oil man. Brief services were held for her in Longview Saturday afternoon.

     The services here Sunday were at the home of a sister, Mrs. W. A. Leatherman with Revs. S. M. Bennett and Noel E. Keith officiating. Burial was in the Arlington Cemetery.

     Survivors include the husband; a daughter, Mrs. Bert Tucker, Robstown; mother, Mrs. F. J. Appleton, Arlington; two brothers, Roy Appleton, Mount Pleasant, and C. C. Appleton, Wills Point; two sisters, Mrs. Leatherman, and Mrs. J. E. Bo?ley, Crenshaw, Miss., and a grand-daughter, Sherry Tucker, Robstown.

Thursday January 25 (The TARRANT COUNTY CITIZEN)

     RIFLE BALLS By E. G. Senter

     Judge Charles Amos Leddy, aged 60, of Houston, Texas, a retired Judge of the Texas Supreme Court Commission of Appeals, is dead at the Columbia County Club in Washington. He died shortly after he had entertained a gathering of Spanish-American War veterans with an after dinner talk. Originally appointed by Gov. Dan Moody in 1927 to the Commission of Appeals, he was reappointed when the law was amended transferring the appointive power from the Governor to the Supreme Court. He resigned in July, 1933, to re-enter the practice of law at Houston.

     The Army airplane plans which recently were stolen, but recovered, were for a secret new bomber which will be the world‘s largest. The plane itself, a craft of more than 70 tons, believed capable of a round trip, non-stop, Atlantic flight, is nearing completion at the Santa Monica, Calif., plant of the Douglas Aircraft Company, and will be given its first tests next summer. At least one government was said to be interested in obtaining the stolen designs. Details of the experimental craft are still guarded, but aviation men understand it has a wing spread of more than 200 feet, and is equipped with new model high-powered motors which promise a range of 6,000, or possibly 7,000 miles. Any Army plane in service would be dwarfed by the new ship.

     In preparation for a long war Great Britain and France are arranging for the purchase of as many as 12,000 American war planes in the next two years. With steady shipments of American military planes on contracts signed since the start of hostilities, the Allies expect to exceed the German production rate by the middle of the coming summer.

Thursday January 25 (The TARRANT COUNTY CITIZEN)

     Death Ends Colorful Career Of Dr. Wm. Harold Davis

     Dr. William Harold Davis, 81, physician and surgeon here for 53 years, died early

    Wednesday at his home. He had been ill for the last 27 months as a result of a partial stroke of paralysis.

     The ARLINGTON CITIZEN, Arlington, Texas. 1940

     Dr. Davis was born in Smythe County, Va., Dec. 12, 1858. He attended neighborhood school, two sessions at an agricultural college and two years under a preceptor before he entered Physicians and Surgeons College, now combined with the State University at Baltimore, Md. He was graduated from the college in time to have his kit filled and go down to Washington the morning of March 4, 1881, to hear President Hayes inaugurated.

     Texas was considered ―the jumping off place‖ at that time, but Dr. Davis saw

    opportunity in the new State, and set out on the 10-day trip. He landed safely at Handley, for some reason he never later could recall, and set up practice.

     Dr. Davis spent $25 of his $65 capital for a quick-stepping pony. A saddle took $30 more. He accepted the offer of sleeping quarters at the back of a drug store and waited for his first patient.

     Three days later, breaking his picket rope in a storm, the pony was crippled. It hardly would have been more tragic if the doctor had lost his medicine kit. The Handley folks, however, were neighborly. They lent him a horse, and it wasn‘t long before he got one of his own for treating two cases of scarlet fever.

     Arlington with its bigger population and frequent gun battles looked more profitable to Dr. Davis after six years of treating Handley‘s aches and pains, and he made the move.

     Frequently he recalled that at the time he opened his Arlington office there were seven saloons in the town and seven ―feuds‖ of every saloon. Consequently, though malaria raged in

    those days, he administered first aid for gunshot wounds oftener than he measured out quinine.

     After a few years he was appointed city physician, a post he held for 20 years.

     Once in a wholesale shooting on the railroad station platform on Christmas Eve, four men were shot to death and another was so seriously wounded that he lived barely long enough to be taken to the county jail and made comfortable on a cot. Dr. Davis took him to the jail on a midnight train and had to wait in Fort Worth until he could get a train back the next day. When he got back the town was in an uproar. The shooting had been the outburst of an old feud. It involved dozens. Two men came to the doctor and got a list of all his patients, so that if he were needed quickly it wouldn‘t be difficult to find him.

     Shortly after arriving in Arlington Dr. Davis joined partnership with the late Dr. H. C. Stevens. The partnership lasted four years, until Dr. Stevens moved to Fort Worth.

     Dr. Davis was interested in the growth of Arlington and took part in many civic enterprises. He served as both alderman and mayor. While mayor he signed the first bond issue for the first sewer system of the town. He also was a charter member of the Arlington Chamber of Commerce and served it as president.

     He was active in the Fort Worth and Tarrant County Medical Association and at one time served as vice president of the body.

     Dr. Davis also was a charter member of the Arlington Knights of Pythias Lodge. He was an elder of the Arlington Presbyterian Church at the time of his death.

     Pilitias was another of his interests. A lifelong Democrat, at one time he was a member of the Tarrant County executive committee.

     Notwithstanding his other interests, Dr. Davis‘ chief delight was his automobile.

    (unreadable) more patients on horseback, than by horse and buggy.

     When automobiles came, Dr. Davis was the owner of the third one in Tarrant County. Then for (unreadable) he found himself unpopular. Farmers saw the car chugging down the road and rused out brandishing shotguns. His machine scared their horses.

     Dr. Davis is survived by his widow; two sons, Olin Davis, 1419 Thomas Place, Fort Worth, and Dr. Charles H. Davis, Arlington; two daughters, Mrs. G. C. Thompson and Mrs. W. Harold Watson, Arlington, and seven grandchildren.

     Funeral services were conducted at 2:30 p.m. Thursday at the Arlington Presbyterian Church. Rev. John H. Patterson, pastor, and Rev. S. M. Bennett, past pastor, of the church, and Rev. A. M. Hall, pastor of the Arlington Methodist Church officiated. Burial was in the Arlington Cemetery.

     Pallbearers were Charles Coulter, Walter Leverett, Francis Harvey, Will G. Hiett, Web Rose, John Houston and Champ Barnes, all of Arlington, and George Beggs of Fort Worth

     The ARLINGTON CITIZEN, Arlington, Texas. 1940

    Thursday January 25 (The TARRANT COUNTY CITIZEN)

     Mrs. Stewart Passes Away Here Monday

     Services for Mrs. Matilda Stewart, 71, who died Monday at the home of her daughter,

    Mrs. F. R. Hickman, after a short illness, were conducted at 10 a.m. Tuesday at Arlington Methodist Church by Rev. A. W. Hall. Burial was in the Little Bethal Cemetery near Duncanville.

     Mrs. Stewart, the widow of A. A. Stewart of Hico, lived here for the past eight years.

     Survivors are four sons, Clyde Stewart of Copperas Cove, and Walter, Emmett and Claude Stewart of Gatesville; another daughter, Mrs. W. L. Anderson of Phoenix, Ariz.; a sister, Mrs. Louise Beville of Cleburne; 22 grandchildren and 16 great-grandchildren.

Thursday January 25 (The TARRANT COUNTY CITIZEN)

    th Mrs. G. O. Price Dies In Tulsa January 17 th Mrs. G. O. Price, aged 71, died at her home in Tulsa, Oklahoma January 17. She

    had apparently been in her usual health the night before, but became suddenly ill early the next morning and passed away before her family reached her bedside.

     Mrs. Price was the mother of Mrs. Jake Tate of Arlington. Besides Mrs. Tate, she is survived by her husband, two other daughters, Mrs. Rupert Warren and Miss Helen Price, both of Girard, Kansas, and two sons, Haskell and Frank Price of Fort Worth.

     Funeral services were held in Tulsa with burial following in Muskogee where the deceased had lived most of her life.

Thursday February 1 (The TARRANT COUNTY CITIZEN)

     W. B. Decker’s Mother Dies in Aberdeen, Wash.

     W. B. Decker received a message Friday night of the death of his mother in Aberdeen, Washington. The message gave no particulars other than she died suddenly. Mr. Decker was ill at the time and was unable to attend the funeral.

Thursday February 8 (The TARRANT COUNTY CITIZEN)

     T. B. Davis Dies Sat. After Long Illness

     Funeral services for T. B. Davis, 78, who died at his home 5 miles south of Arlington at 10:30 Saturday night after an illness of several years, were held at 3:30 Sunday afternoon at the Moore Funeral Home, with Rev. Ike T. Sidebottom officiating. Interment was in Grand Prairie.

     Mr. Davis had lived in Tarrant County 22 years and was a member of the Nazarine Church.

     He is survived by his widow, two daughters, Mrs. H. N. Lawin of Arlington, and Mrs. Ben Goldman of Florence Hill; five sons, H. H., Ferris, Texas; T. R., Midlothian, Tex.; Steve, McAllister, Oklahoma; Bill, Phoenix, Ariz., and Clyde Davis of Arlington, and 29 grandchildren.

Thursday February 8 (The TARRANT COUNTY CITIZEN)

     Richard S. Kelley Dies In Ft. Worth Hospital

     Richard S. Kelley, 65, died in a Fort Worth hospital Sunday morning after a week‘s illness.

     Mr. Kelley had lived in Mt. Pleasant for a number of years. He is survived by his widow, five daughters, three sons, three sisters, and two brothers.

     Funeral services were held Monday at the Missouri Ave. Methodist Church with Rev. Wilson Canafax and Rev. Thurman Scheumack officiating. Burial was in Parkdale Cemetery with the Moore Funeral Home in charge of arrangements.

     Pallbearers were C. A. Butler, A. M. Moates, Luther Knox, Leroy Chism, M. C. McKinley, and Guy Watkins.

     The ARLINGTON CITIZEN, Arlington, Texas. 1940

    Thursday February 8 (The TARRANT COUNTY CITIZEN)

     Funeral Services For Truman Ray Lomax

     Truman Ray Lomax, 26, died in a Fort Worth hospital at 2 p.m. Tuesday following an injury sustained while working in a gravel pit south of Fort Worth on January 18.

     He is survived by his widow, Mrs. Pauline Lomax, his mother, Mrs. Emma Isham, one sister, Helen Lomax, Los Angeles, California, and his grandparents.

     Funeral services were to be held this morning at 9:30 at the Handley Church of Christ. Burial will be in the Hanable Cemetery near Stephenville. Moore Funeral Home is in charge of arrangements.

Thursday February 8 (The TARRANT COUNTY CITIZEN)

     Rev. W. L. Barr Dies Suddenly In Sherman

     Mr. and Mrs. F. E. Shanks of South Collins Street were shocked the news of the death of their son-in-law, Rev. W. L. Barr, pastor of the Travis Street Methodist Church in Sherman.

     They left early Friday with their daughter and her husband, Mr. and Mrs. H.F. Riemenshulder of Yoakum, who drove up Thursday night. Another daughter, Mrs. H. H. Halsell of Lubbock, who arrived Friday morning also accompanied them.

     Funeral services were conducted at the church Saturday at 3 p.m. with his entire membership in mourning.

     Rev. Barr is survived by his widow and five children, T. G. Barr of Phoenix; Mrs. M. C. Dalchau, Llano, and Allen and Allene, 20-year-old twins, and Genevieve, 18.

Thursday February 15 (The TARRANT COUNTY CITIZEN)

     Rev. R. A. Walker Dies After Few Hours Illness

     Funeral services for Rev. R. A. Walker, superannuated Methodist minister, who died at

    the home of his daughter, Mrs. Knox Kinard, in Hereford Saturday after an illness of a few hours, were conducted Sunday afternoon at 3:30 with Rev. A. W. Hall, Rev. W. W. Moss, and Rev. W. D. Andrews officiating. Burial was in Rose Hill Burial Park Monday at 10 a.m.

     Rev. Walker was a well-known and beloved figure about Arlington since 1932 when he moved here to make his home, after having rounded out 39 years of itinerant ministry.

     He was born in New Boston, Texas, June 21, 1863. Very early in life his parents died and he went to live with a foster-father, near Commerce. In his early teens he decided to go west and grow up with the country and he found employment as a ranch hand near Seymour on the Wagner Ranch. Soon after this, having come to know Christ, he felt the call to preach the gospel and enrolled as a student at Granbury College.

     Here he served as keeper of the College building, chopping wood and carrying it to the various rooms in the three-story building.

     Soon he left the school and entered active ministry. In 1903 Rev. Walker was admitted on trial in the Old Northwest Texas Conference and was sent to a small community near Granbury in order to serve his charge and attend school at the same time. Here began that long ministry that was to carry him all over northwest Texas. In 1901 he transferred for a time to the Indian Mission Conference, but returned to this conference in 1904.

     He served Italy, Mart, Moody, Fort Worth, Temple, Waco, Blooming Grove, and other churches of Texas.

     In 1882 he was united in marriage with Miss Fitzsimmons, of Lancaster, Texas, and to them were born three daughters, two of whom with their mother survive him. They are Mrs. Knox Kinard of Hereford, and Miss Aline Walker, a teacher in the San Angelo school. th Rev. Walker‘s long and useful life came to a close in his 76 year.

     The ARLINGTON CITIZEN, Arlington, Texas. 1940

    Thursday February 15 (The TARRANT COUNTY CITIZEN)

     Funeral Services Held For Mr. H. N. Miller

     Mr. H. N. Miller, 66, died at his home in Ardmore, Oklahoma, Monday after a short illness. Funeral services were held Thursday at 3 p.m. at the Moore Funeral Home, with burial in Rehobeth Cemetery. Rev. Kermit T. Melugin officiated.

     Mr. Miller is survived by his wife, two sisters and one brother.

Thursday February 15 (The TARRANT COUNTY CITIZEN)

     Aged Tarrant Resident Is Burned To Death

     R. T. McFaddin, who had lived 84 of his 89 years in Tarrant County, was burned to death when fire destroyed the four-room McFaddin home at Webb, southwest of Arlington, at 11:45 p.m. Wednesday.

     Mrs. McFaddin, 74, was burned slightly as she was taken from the burning home by Mr. and Mrs. H. E. Crumpley who lived with the couple.

     Cause of the fire was not determined. Mr. McFaddin, who had been a farmer, was burned beyond recognition.

     Justice of the Peace W. H. Powers, who conducted an investigation, returned an inquest verdict of accidental death.

     Other survivors are three sons, J. T., H. G. and Clint McFaddin, all of Arlington; five daughters, Mrs. W. D. Staley, Dallas; Mrs. J. D. Isom, Arlington; Mrs. J. W. Webb, Afton; Mrs. Lizzie Dewberry and Mrs. N. E. Ward, both of Fort Worth; 33 grandchildren and 31 great-grandchildren.

     Funeral services will be held at 3:30 p.m. Friday at the Moore Funeral Home here, with Rev. Ike Sidebottom of Fort Worth officiating. Burial will be in the Watson Cemetery. Grandsons will be pallbearers.

Thursday February 15 (The TARRANT COUNTY CITIZEN)

     Services Held Sunday For Mrs. S. D. Graham

     Mrs. S. D. Graham, 76 years old, died at noon Saturday after a short illness. Mrs. Graham had lived in the Watson and Arlington community for the past 49 years.

     She is survived by three sons, John S. Graham, C. B. Graham, and Denton Graham, two daughters, Miss Josie Bailey and Mrs. Mamme Clark and seven grandchildren.

     Funeral services were held at 3 p.m. Sunday at the Pantego Church, burial was in Watson Cemetery. Rev. A. Brown and W. E. Hawkins officiated.

Thursday February 15 (The TARRANT COUNTY CITIZEN)

     Father of Claude Estes Dies in Fort Worth

     John F. Estes, father of Claude Estes of Arlington, died in a Fort Worth hospital Tuesday after an illness of six weeks. He was 72.

     Mr. Estes came to Tarrant County at 18 and had lived in Kennedale since.

     He is survived by his widow, two other sons, four daughters, two brothers and three grandchildren.

     Funeral services were conducted at 10 a.m. Wednesday at Shannon‘s Polytechnic

    Funeral Home by Rev. Henry Brannon of Tate Springs. Burial was in Kennedale Cemetery.

Thursday February 15 (The TARRANT COUNTY CITIZEN)

     Nephew of Mrs. G. A. Percifield Buried Fri.

     Funeral services were conducted last Friday at the Gause-Ware Funeral Home in Fort for Mr. Albert Main, nephew of Mrs. G. A. Percifield. Burial was in Mt. Olive Cemetery with military rites.

Thursday February 15 (The TARRANT COUNTY CITIZEN)

     RIFLE BALLS By E. G. Senter

     It‘s little more than an overnight jaunt now from Florida‘s resort to Europe. The American Clipper of Pan American Airways‘ trans-Atlantic service took off from Miami, Florida,

     The ARLINGTON CITIZEN, Arlington, Texas. 1940 rdat dawn on February 3, and was scheduled to reach Lisbon, Portugal, early the morning of the succeeding day. Now, with seven months‘ experience, Pan American has arranged for heavier loads and will omit Horta, in the Azores, from its itinerary. These innovations are expected to reduce the flying time to 24 hours in good weather. The line‘s Miami base is the

    northern terminus for its extensive Latin-American itineraries.

     Busy American aircraft plants have delivered more than 1,100 warplanes to the British and French fighting forces, an authoritative compilation shows. The two governments have placed orders for approximately 4,000 planes since they first turned to the United States for help eighteen months ago. More than 300 planes have been loaded on merchant ships or tugged across the Canadian border since the European war started. In addition to the British and French contracts, about 1,000 American planes have been ordered by other governments.

Thursday February 22 (The TARRANT COUNTY CITIZEN)

     Funeral Services Held For Eugene Davenport

     Funeral services for Mr. Eugene Overton Davenport, 55, a retired furniture dealer,

    who died Tuesday night in a Fort Worth hospital, were held yesterday afternoon at Ranger, his former home.

     Survivors are his mother, one son, O. E. Davenport, Arlington, two brothers, J. A., Arlington, and W. P. Davenport, Springtown, and a sister, Miss Estelle Davenport, Arlington.

Thursday February 22 (The TARRANT COUNTY CITIZEN)

     John M. Lawson Dies After Short Illness

     John M. Lawson, 64, died in a Fort Worth hospital early Tuesday after a short illness.

     Funeral services were held at 10 a.m. Wednesday at the Pantego Church, with Rev. Ike T. Sidebottom officiating.

     He is survived by his wife, two daughters, Mrs. C. C. Fuller, and Mrs. Richard Rogers, six sons, Claude, Aubrey, Hillery, Hurbert, Anthon, and Alton. all of Arlington; five brothers and two sisters. Eleven grandchildren also survive.

     Interment was in Johnson Station Cemetery with Moore Funeral Home in charge of arrangements.

Thursday February 22 (The TARRANT COUNTY CITIZEN)

     E. D. Morrow Dies In Fort Worth Hospital

     E. D. Morrow, 35, died in a Fort Worth hospital Wednesday afternoon from injuries received a week ago when a horse he was trying to capture, bolted and kicked him in the head. He was employed by the J. P. Sanders Dairy, three miles northwest of Arlington, and lived with his family on the dairy property.

     Funeral services were conducted at 4 p.m. yesterday at the Moore Funeral Home with Rev. S. M. Bennett officiating.

     Mr. Morrow is survived by his wife, four children and five brothers.

     Burial was in Parkdale Cemetery

Thursday February 22 (The TARRANT COUNTY CITIZEN)

     Funeral Services Held For Lloyd R. Haas

     Funeral services were held Wednesday at 2 p.m. at the Moore Funeral Home for Lloyd

    R. Haas, 70, who died at his home in Arlington Tuesday at 12:15 after an illness of several months.

     He was a retired insurance salesman and had lived in Arlington for the past 14 years.

     Interment was in the Laurel Land Cemetery in Dallas. Rev. S. M. Bennett officiated.

     Mr. Haas is survived by his widow, one daughter, Mrs. Rex E. Mullis, one granddaughter, Nancy Gail Mullis, all of Arlington, and one brother, Fred Haas of Michigan City, Indiana.

     Pallbearers were G. E. Winford, Homer Spencer, Edwin Haskin, P. W. Bailey, Per?? Cox and Mr. Hipple.

     The ARLINGTON CITIZEN, Arlington, Texas. 1940

    Thursday February 22 (The TARRANT COUNTY CITIZEN)

     RIFLE BALLS By E. G. Senter

     Plane travel between New York and Florida is running 70 per cent ahead of last year. Flying to Mexico is so popular that three new 21-passenger planes are to be put into service within the next few weeks on the New York-Brownsville (Texas) run.

     Uncle Sam has just counted the remnant of his buffalo herd which 100 years ago was 80,000,000 strong. Now, the Bureau of Biological Survey reports there are slightly more than 5,000 bisonas scientists prefer to call the buffaloin the United States and Alaska.

    Buffaloes multiply rapidly in captivity. For example, the Alaska herd, which range the Delta River region, was established in 1928 with a nucleus of 23 animals. Today the herd has over 200 members. Buffaloes reach their prime at the age of 6 or 7 years. A cow will produce one calf a year and live for 30 or 40 years.

     On the fifth day of this month, John M. Moore, Sr., died at his home in Richmond,

    Texas, at the age of 72 years. He was a former member of the Texas Legislature, and from th1905 to 1913 represented the old 8 congressional District in Congress, the district at that time embracing the city of Houston, with adjoining counties, including Fort Bend in which Mr. Moore resided.

     All enterprise in warring Germany has been subordinated to the general welfare of the nation in its struggle with the Eastern powers. Even the newspapers have not escaped, for in the effort to conserve the paper supply for other purposes, the provincial editions of all Berlin newspapers except the Nazi party organ have been eliminated. Regular editions have been reduced in size and a basic minimum of paper is being allotted to the newspaper publishing organization.

Thursday February 29 (The TARRANT COUNTY CITIZEN)

     Mrs. Addie Wood Dies Suddenly Wednesday

     Mrs. Addie Wood, 79, died very suddenly Wednesday night at the Home for Aged

    Masons at Arlington. She had been a resident at the Home for 7 years, having come here from Whitesboro. She is survived by her husband, G. W. Wood, also of the Home.

     Funeral services were to be held this morning at 10 a.m. at the Masonic Home Chapel, with Rev. S. M. Bennett officiating. Burial will be in the Keystone Cemetery. Moore Funeral Home in charge of arrangements.

Thursday March 7 Funeral Services Held For John E. Pierce

     Funeral services for John E. Pierce, 75, who died Monday at the Home for Aged

    Masons, were conducted Tuesday in the Masonic Chapel with Rev. Sherwood S. Clayton officiating.

     Mr. Pierce, who had lived at the home for the past 4 years, was formerly a fuel dealer in Fort Worth.

     Burial was in Mt. Olivet Cemetery there.

Thursday March 7 Mrs. May V. Bailey Dies Here Monday

     Funeral services were held at 3 p.m. Wednesday for Mrs. May Victoria Bailey, 57, who

    died at her home in Arlington at 11 p.m. Monday. Rev. Frederick J. Ross of the Arlington Church of Christ officiated, with burial in the Arlington Cemetery.

     Survivors are her husband, W. E. Bailey; three sons, James B., Robert L., and Herbert M. Bailey, all of Arlington; three daughters, Mrs. O. E. Jones, Grand Prairie; Mrs. A. G. Gardner and Mrs. J. K. Lee, both of Fort Worth; and three grandchildren.

     Pallbearers were Joe Bailey, James D. Bailey, Chauncy Bradford, Charlie Bucher, Harvey Bailey and Joe Bradford.

     Luttrell Funeral Home was in charge of arrangements.

Thursday March 7 Mrs. Nellie Wynn Dies After Week’s Illness

     Mrs. Nellie Wynn, 71, mother of Jack K. Wynn of Arlington, died at 5:30 p.m. Monday at her home, 3 miles northeast of Handley, after a week‘s illness.

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