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A First Step Towards Environmental Reporting (2006- 2007

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A First Step Towards Environmental Reporting (2006- 2007

     CBD

    Distr. GENERAL

    UNEP/CBD/COP/9/INF/42

    22 April 2008

    ENGLISH ONLY

CONFERENCE OF THE PARTIES TO THE

    CONVENTION ON BIOLOGICAL DIVERSITY

    Ninth meeting

    Bonn, 1930 May 2008

    A FIRST STEP TOWARDS ENVIRONMENTAL REPORTING (2006- 2007)

    Note by the Executive Secretary)

     CONTENTS

1. INTRODUCTION ........................................................................................................................... 2

    1.1. MESSAGE FROM THE EXECUTIVE SECRETARY............................................................................. 2 1.2. THE UN CONTEXT ...................................................................................................................... 3

    1.3. THE REPORT ............................................................................................................................... 4

    2. OFFICE PRACTICES .................................................................................................................... 4

    2.1. MATERIALS ................................................................................................................................ 4

    2.1.1. Office Paper........................................................................................................................ 4

    2.1.2. Publications ........................................................................................................................ 5

    2.1.3. Related Consumables .......................................................................................................... 6

    2.1.4. Recycle and Reuse............................................................................................................... 6

    2.1.5. Utilities ............................................................................................................................... 6

    2.1.6. Computers and IT Equipment .............................................................................................. 6

    2.2. GREEN PROCUREMENT ............................................................................................................... 7

    2.3. CARBON EMISSIONS AND OFFSETTING ACTIVITIES....................................................................... 8

    2.3.1. Staff Commute to Work ....................................................................................................... 8

    2.3.2. Calculations and Offsetting Initiatives ................................................................................. 8

    2.4. RAISING STAFF AWARENESS ........................................................................................................ 9

    3. OFFICIAL MEETINGS OUTSIDE THE CBD PREMISES ........................................................ 9

    3.1. GREENING CBD MEETINGS ........................................................................................................ 9

    3.2. EFFORTS TOWARDS GREENING COP-9 ..................................................................................... 10 4. CONCLUSION & POSSIBLE NEXT STEPS ............................................................................. 11

    5. PRELIMINARY GRI INDEX REPORT CONTENT ................................................................. 12

    6. ACRONYMS ................................................................................................................................. 14

    /…

     In order to minimize the environmental impacts of the Secretariat‟s processes, and to contribute to the Secretary-General‟s initiative for a C-Neutral UN, this document is printed in limited numbers. Delegates are kindly requested to bring their copies to meetings and not to request additional copies.

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    1. INTRODUCTION

1.1. MESSAGE FROM THE EXECUTIVE SECRETARY

    On World Environment Day on 5 June 2007, Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon pledged to reduce the United Nations (UN) carbon emissions and to work towards more efficient use of energy and resources. In so doing, he asked all members of the UN family to join him in this effort. The Executive Director of the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), Mr. Achim Steiner, confirmed UNEP‟s commitment to achieving climate neutrality as well as assisting all UN agencies, funds, and programmes in these endeavours.

    I am proud to say that we, the Secretariat of the Convention on Biological Diversity (SCBD), as the lead international instrument in the field of biodiversity fully support these commitments. Indeed, on 31 March 2006 at the closure of the eighth meeting of the Conference of the Parties (COP8) to the Convention, an agreement was signed with H.E. Mr. Roberto Requião, the Governor of the State of Paraná, Brazil, for the planting of 8 million trees to compensate for the environmental impacts of the meeting attended by 4,000 delegates. Another two-year agreement will be signed with the Governor of Paraná at the margins of the ninth meeting of the Conference of the Parties, to be held in Bonn in May 2008, to complement the commitment by Germany as reflected in the host agreement signed with the Secretariat to promote a carbon-neutral COP. A tradition has thus been established for greening the meetings of the Convention.

    In my capacity as the head of the Secretariat of one of the most widely subscribed to international environmental agreements, I am very pleased to also announce that the 70 staff of the Secretariat, guided by the principle to lead by example and to walk the talk, have also established a tradition in greening its operations. Indeed in November 2006, a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) was signed with the President of the Green Belt Movement and Nobel Laureate, Dr. Wangari Maathai to offset the environmental impact of the Secretariat processes by planting trees in Africa. Thanks to the leadership of Ms. Monique Barbut, CEO of the Global Environmental Facility (GEF), this historical MOU has been generously supported by the financial mechanism of the Convention. To compensate for the 2007 environmental impact of the Secretariat and offset the 500 tonnes of CO equivalent from 2

    official staff travel, 3,000 trees will be soon planted by the Green Belt Movement in the Ngong forest, Kenya.

    In signing a three-year agreement with the Secretariat on 22 May 2007 at the occasion of the celebration of the International Day on Biodiversity, the official travel agent of the Secretariat, MKI, has decided to join forces with the Secretariat to contribute to offsetting the emissions of MKI staff‟s official travel as

    well as to promote the importance of neutralizing carbon on business travel to its client base.

    Additionally, in September 2006, an internal greening task force of the Secretariat was established. The first Greening Plan was finalized and greening newsletters have been produced. We have a dedicated team that works to raise awareness amongst staff and green the practices of the CBD. In many cases, a great deal of progress has been made.

    As the leading international instrument for the conservation and protection of biodiversity, we feel it is our job not only to green our practices but also to ensure that our practices do not directly harm the very thing we are trying to protect: biodiversity. It is for this reason that I feel it is important to share our work with the Conference of the Parties (COP); but more than this, to share it with other organisations too. While reducing carbon emissions and achieving climate neutrality are vital goals, and a valuable rallying point, the SCBD also wishes to encourage the world to do more than address GHG emissions.

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    If we are to conserve and protect the biodiversity that is the mainstay of life on earth, we must also consider our impacts on it when making environmental choices. We hope that through our work within the SCBD we can lead by example and encourage the UN family and other organisations to consider not only their carbon emissions and efficient use of energy and resources, but their impacts on biodiversity as well. Naturally efficient use of resources will reduce the strain on biodiversity, but one also needs to consider which resources are being used: are they endangered species; are they harvested in a sustainable manner; are they benefiting local populations; and the list goes on.

    At the same time, we note that we still have much to learn on reporting from other organisations. In our first report, we have focused on the environmental indicators of the Global Reporting Initiative. We must now address the economic and social practices of the Secretariat. Considering my own commitment to this, as well as the enthusiasm of the staff at the Secretariat, I have no doubt that we will achieve full reporting in the coming years.

    As we all know, biodiversity is at the root of all life and every activity. Thus, actually achieving conservation of biodiversity requires a multi-layered web of intersecting initiatives involving all stakeholders. The Norwegian playwright Henrik Ibsen once said, A thousand words will not leave so

    deep an impression as one deed.” Indeed, every small step counts and helps to build towards larger initiatives. It is our role, and moral responsibility as the SCBD, to forge new ground and set new standards. Our efforts, achievements, and goals are outlined in this document.

1.2. THE UN CONTEXT

    The Secretariat, as the body responsible for arranging, servicing and preparing documentation for meetings of the Convention, has a particularly important role in minimizing the Convention‟s environmental footprint. Several initiatives across the UN and its Environment Programme in particular are relevant to the Secretariat‟s greening efforts. These include:

    (1) UNEP Governing Council decision 18/10 (1995) calling on the Executive Director of UNEP to

    consider and recommend strategies for the promotion of best practices in environmental

    housekeeping for use by UNEP at its headquarters and in its regional offices, and to advise and

    encourage the rest of the United Nations system to develop similar strategies; (2) Governing Council decision 23/8 (2005) requesting the Executive Director of UNEP to prepare a

    report on environmental and equity considerations regarding current practices in UNEP; (3) The creation in 2001 of the Environment Management Group (EMG) (see box below);

    (4) The publication of a Sustainability Report for 2004-2005 by UNEP‟s Division of Technology,

    Industry, and Economics (DTIE) (see box below.)

    (5) The Secretary General announced his plans to make the UN Headquarters carbon-neutral and

    environmentally sustainable and indicated that this initiative should include the other United

    Nations headquarters and offices around the globe. We are already moving towards making our

    Headquarters in New York climate-neutral and environmentally sustainable. […] I would like to see

    our renovated Headquarters complex eventually become a globally acclaimed model of efficient use

    of energy and resources. Beyond New York, the initiative should include the other United Nations

    headquarters and offices around the globe.” (Ban Ki-moon, remarks to the World Tourism

    Organization, 5 June 2007, World Environment Day.)

     The Environmental Management Group (EMG) www.unemg.org

    What it is, how it helps the SCBD in greening its operations

    The role of the EMG is to enhance UN system-wide inter-agency coordination related to specific issues in the field of, inter alia, the environment. In June 2007, an Issue Management Group (IMG) on Climate, or Carbon Neutral

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    (C-Neutral), and another on Sustainable Procurement were created. The Secretariat provided input into IMG meetings.

    UNEP/DTIE 2004-2005 Sustainability Report

    The 2004-2005 Sustainability Report “Learning by doing” presents an overview of the organizational sustainability (economic, social and environmental) performance of the UNEP Division of Technology, Industry and Economics (UNEP/DTIE), using the Global Reporting Initiative Guidelines. UNEP DTIE was thus the first UN entity to produce a report on progress made in critical areas of sustainability. For further information, visit http://www.unep.fr/en/about/activity_report.htm

In this context, and in order to minimize its own footprint, the Secretariat:

     (1) Prepared a draft plan for minimizing the environmental impact of the operations of the CBD (finalized in June 2006). The document addresses how the Secretariat can minimize the negative environmental impact of its operations, including meetings of the Convention. Appendix A shows the progress that has been made since this report.

     (2) Established, in June 2006, a task force responsible for greening the activities of the Secretariat and to help implement the plan. The task force focuses on:

    ; Greening office operations;

    ; Minimizing the impacts of CBD meetings;

    ; Raising staff awareness and

    ; Reporting

1.3. THE REPORT

    This report highlights „greening‟ efforts undertaken over 2006-2007. It analyzes the integration of sustainable practices into the Secretariat‟s operations. This is the Secretariat‟s first attempt at analyzing the integration of sustainable practices into its operations. The report uses, as much as much as possible, the environmental indicators of the Global Reporting Initiative (GRI) guidelines (3rd generation.) With this report, the Secretariat wishes to (1) demonstrate its commitment to minimizing the impacts of its operations, in line with the objectives of the Convention, (2) contribute to the efforts of greening UNEP and UN-wide operations. This report mainly examines the environmental performances of the SCBD‟s operations and focuses on the environmental performances of the Secretariat operations, leaving the other sustainability aspects social, economic and governance for future reporting efforts.

2. OFFICE PRACTICES

2.1. MATERIALS

     12.1.1. Office Paper [EN1] [EN6] [EN16]

     Staff member says:

    Facts and figures The SCBD office uses 100% post consumer “I replaced my paper bills

    by e-bills to reduce my recycled paper, in all printers and photocopiers. In the year 2006,

    paper consumption.” the Secretariat used 899 reams of paper (4500 lbs, or

    approximately 2 tonnes) corresponding to 3.6 tonnes of CO 2

    equivalent. In 2007, the SCBD used 911 reams corresponding to 23.7 tonnes of COThe slight upward trend for total paper consumption is due to the fact that there was 2.

    a higher number of staff in 2007 due to a recruitment campaign to fill vacant posts and an increase in the

     1 The references in square brackets are to the environmental indicators in the preliminary Global Reporting Initiative (GRI) guidelines (see page 12 below). 2 http://www.environmentaldefense.org/papercalculator/select.cfm

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    number of interns 14 interns enrolled in 2007, of which three started their internship in 2006. The slight increase from 2006 to 2007 in paper consumption compared to the large staff increase indicates an

    overall decrease in paper consumption by the SCBD staff. (The figures presented below also include

    paper consumption for small meetings held at the Secretariat).

     CBD paper consumption 2006-2007CBD Paper consumption for 2006-2007

     20160911140 91016120899 10020061280 89012200760Reams11 840 87020Reams total per 40Reams per person year 08502006 2007 JanuaryYearsFebruary MonthsMarchTotalPer person April May

    June2.1.2. Publications [EN1] [EN5] [EN16] July AugustFacts and figures Specific environmental criteria is to be at the forefront of any request for proposal September

    Octobersent to vendors for printing of publications. At the time of the issuance of this Environmental Report, 3Novemberthe SCBD changed from using the criteria in UNEP‟s Publishing Policy, First Edition to the criteria 4Decembercontained in the Second Edition in their requests for proposals for printing of publications. Now, at least four of these criteria must be met an each and every publication:

    ; Chlorine-free paper; [That’s our policy]

    CBD business cards are ; Recycled Paper (preferably above 75% percentage);

    printed on 100% recycled ; Wood pulp from sustainably managed forests; paper. ; Post-consumer waste (percentage must be stated);

    ; Mill broke (percentage must be stated);

    ; Ink from renewable resources, e.g. vegetable soy, linseed;

    ; Coatings should be water based;

    ; Minimal percentage of paper bleach and

    ; Mailed in photodegradable polythene Reducing our footprint… [EN5] film. The paper used for our in-house copy paper and for printing of publications is Cascades‟s Rolland Enviro100 Print. This In 2007, the Secretariat published several newsletters, paper contains 100% post-consumer fiber, is certified technical series, an annual report, bookmarks, postcards EcoLogo, is processed chlorine free, is FSC recycled and is and other outreach products amounting to 76,000 lbs or manufactured using biogas energy. By using the Enviro100 34.5 tonnes, equivalent to 62 tonnes of CO equivalent. Print paper as opposed to virgin fiber paper, we reduced our 2

    ecological footprint by saving:

     Challenges and targets As an alternative to printing of

    649 trees publications, electronic distribution of printed materials 18,718 kg of solid waste 117.7 kg of suspended particles in the water 3 http://www.unep.org/policy/publications.pdf 1, 770, 646 L of water 41, 103 kg of air emissions 4 http://www.unep.org/policy/Pub_Policy_SecondEdition.pdf 32,674 m of natural gaz

    www.ecologiquedenature.com/en/calculator.php /…

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    through the CBD website are being explored. This would reduce the amount of publications mailed out

    throughout the world to various interested partners and stakeholders. 2.1.3. Related Consumables [EN1][EN2]

    Facts and figures Toners are recycled after use. Reusable kitchen cutlery, as well as glasses and cups,

    were purchased to be used for all functions organized at the SCBD, replacing previously used paper and

    Styrofoam serving ware.

2.1.4. Recycle and Reuse

Facts and figures Documents printed on one-side are reused for Staff member says:

    draft paper, memo pads, fax confirmation paper and draft printings. “I separate my recycling

    bins by type at home and Office supplies are systematically reused and supplies supporting

    use red worm powered outside meetings are returned to the CBD. The Secretariat, with the compost to reduce my help of the building‟s lessor has provided the office with recycling waste production.” services for cans, metal and glass containers, batteries and mobile phones.

2.1.5. Utilities

Energy and Water Consumption Calculations [EN3]

Facts and figures Based on the total energy consumption of the Montreal World Trade Center, in

    which the Secretariat is located, a basic estimation of our total energy consumption per year is 5624,140 kWh of energy use. According to the WRI report, this is equivalent to 123 tonnes of CO 2

    equivalent.

    Staff member says: “I turn heat down at night and I put a bottle into my toilet tank to save water for each flush.”

2.1.6. Computers and IT Equipment [EN5]

Facts and figures Computers purchased belong to the Energy Star Staff member says: Programme. The energy savings for one computer is 0.4 tonnes of CO 2“All our devices at home equivalent. 122 computers are in use at the Secretariat; the total amount are Energy Star 6of energy savings is 51 tonnes of COequivalent. The UNEP policy is 2 labeled.”

    adhered to for the disposal of obsolete equipment. The SCBD‟s 2007 disposal exercise is certified with a guarantee of disposal following the norms of 7Electronics Product Stewardship Canada (EPSC) to ensure that remanufacturing methods are environmentally safe.

     5 http://pdf.wri.org/wri_co2guide.pdf, World Resource Institute, Working 9 to 5 on Climate Change: An Office Guide 6 www.energystar.gov/guidelines 7 http://www.epsc.ca/

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2.2. GREEN PROCUREMENT

    The SCBD is working towards systemizing efforts to incorporate into the procurement practice. The SCBD is following the work of EMG, which are currently developing guidelines for sustainable procurement policies, which set the ground in soliciting and purchasing environmentally-friendly and socially-responsible products and services. SCBD‟s procurement polices will thus be based on EMG‟s work.

Below are some of the mandatory criteria in achieving sustainable procurement:

    ; IT Equipment: At the time of the issuance of this Environmental Report, the CBD was one of

    the partners contributing to a draft of UNEP‟s sustainable guidelines for the procurement of

    office IT equipment. This finalized document will be used as the CBD‟s guidelines for

    procurement of IT equipment;

    ; Publishing Guidelines: As per the criteria in UNEP‟s Publishing Policy and in section 2.1.2 of

    this report;

    ; Catering services: The CBD uses biodegradable, reusable, recycled and recyclable flatware,

    cutlery, napkins and décor. The Secretariat checks that menus proposed by caterers do not

    include threatened or overexploited species appearing in the IUCN Red List or listed in

    qualified international and national bodies.

    ; Choice of vendors must be recognized as using adequate labour and environmental standards

    as per the UN Global Compact found in the UN Procurement Manual. The 10 principles of the

    Global Compact encompass human rights, labor and environmental standards as a principle 8against corruption.

    BUILDING SERVICES 1The SCBD is located in the Montreal World Trade Center (WTC), a building administrated by SITQ. The WTC is 1certified “Go Green Plus”. The BOMA Go Green Plus Environmental Certification programme is a voluntary program designed for existing or occupied buildings. Its intent is to recognize buildings where environmental best practices have been implemented. The Go Green Plus certification indicates that our lessor identifies reduces, as far as possible, the utilization of ozone depleting substances; engages in energy consumption management, water efficiency, waste reduction and on-site recycling; engages in the safe disposal of hazardous materials and products; controls indoor air, lighting and noise and engages in an environmental management policy through a purchasing policy, emergency response and tenant awareness. The SITQ social responsibility report for 2007 provides 1additional information on property management best practices. SITQ, together with the Agence métropolitaine de

    transport (AMT) and Smart Commuting Montreal make bicycles (during summer months, free of charge) and a 1carpooling system available to the occupants of their buildings. Paper and cardboard recycling in SITQ buildings

    is strongly implemented. In 2006, over 1,600 tonnes of paper and cardboard were recovered and once recycled, close to 20,000 trees will have been saved. The cleaning products used at the CBD are all green cleaning products such as biodegradable dishwashing soap, biobased floor cleaner, hygienic paper made from 100% recycled fibres and hand towels from 94% recycled fibers.

     8 http://www.unglobalcompact.org/

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    2.3. CARBON EMISSIONS AND OFFSETTING ACTIVITIES [EN13]

2.3.1. Staff Commute to Work [EN16] [EN29] Staff member says: Facts and figures 76% of the CBD staff uses public “I take public transport as

    much as possible and transportation. Figures vary slightly depending on the season: in

    coordinate my errands to the summer, staff tend to slightly reduce their use of public minimize use of car.” transportation by walking or cycling to work. Yearly, the staff 9work commute emits approximately 93 tonnes of CO. 2

     Summer staff transport to CBD Car Winter staff transport to CBDpooling Public 2%CarTansportCar pooling 8%2%72%Public transport CarWalk76%12% 12%Walk Bike8%Bike2% 6%

2.3.2. Calculations and Offsetting Initiatives

    [That’s our policy] Internal staff travel authorization - SUMMARY OF CALCULATIONS forms must include an estimate of (In Tonnes of COequivalent) 2 CO emissions. Forms not bearing 2 this calculation are not signed. 2006 2007 Office paper 3.6 3.7

    Staff commute to work 78 93

    Official staff travel 270 500

    Travel of funded participants to CBD meetings n/a 2,049

    CBD Publications n/a 62

    Official meeting documents n/a 4.309

    10Electricity 123 123

    TOTAL CO emissions 474.6 2,835 2

How the CBD Offsets Official Travel

The Green Belt Movement http://greenbeltmovement.org/index.php

    In our efforts to become carbon neutral, the Secretariat signed in November 2006 a Memorandum of

    Understanding (MoU) with the Green Belt Movement to offset carbon emissions by investing in tree-planting

    projects in Kenya. As a first step towards implementing this MoU, the Secretariat offset the emissions from

    official staff travel in 2006 and 2007. Through the planting, 3000 native trees will be planted in the Ngong forest,

    Kenya.

     9 www.nativeenergy.com 10 This figure was calculated with the calculation tool of the World Resource Institute (WRI) report “Working 9 to 5 on Climate Change: An Office Guide”. http://pdf.wri.org/wri_co2guide.pdf

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GEF Financing www.gefweb.org

    In 2006, the GEF Secretariat transferred USD 10,000 to the Secretariat as its contribution for offsetting CO2

    emissions related to the travel of CBD staff.

2.4. RAISING STAFF AWARENESS

Electronic in-house staff awareness bulletins are a means to Staff member says:

    “At home, we teach the communicate internally on best office practices, such as green

    kids how to save water and commuting, reduce waste, recycle and reuse. The one-page bulletins

    how to recycle and reuse”. give a short overview of various issues with statistics, links for

    further information and examples of actions that can be performed

    at work and at home. The main objective is to further raise

    awareness and demonstrate ways to green the office through simple actions. Since January 2006, five bulletins have been disseminated dealing with: e-waste recycling, shopping bags, water consumption and special events. Our lessor also communicates with the SCBD through an internal quarterly bulletin, which addresses environment-related activities, innovations, suggestions and is displayed in common areas.

3. OFFICIAL MEETINGS OUTSIDE THE CBD PREMISES

    Since 2006, SCBD staff have been discussing ways to improve the sustainability of CBD official meetings including COP, MOP, SBSTTA, Workshops, etc.

3.1. GREENING CBD MEETINGS

Paper

    The total number of meetings held in 2007 was 34 this number does not include the four Bureau

    meetings. Six major meetings were held during the year: Liability and Redress-3 and 4, SBSTTA-12, WRGI-2, ABSWG-5 and WG8J-5. The number of pages produced for these meetings are presented below.

    Tonnes CO 2Meetings Number of pages equivalent*

    Liability and Redress-4 51,605 587

    WGRI-2 2,643 30

    SBSTTA-12 44,597 507

    Liability and Redress-3 20,651 235

    ABSWG-5 154,323 1,756

    WG8J-5 104,950 1,194

    TOTAL 378,769 4.309

*Calculated using 30% post-consumer recycled paper at www.papercalculator.org

    Since 2007, all pre-session documents are only available on the CBD‟s website, and no longer printed

    and distributed to all parts of the world for environmental reasons. Delegates are reminded, through

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    information notes to meetings and on the bottom of the first page of all official documents to bring their 11own copies of documents. Participants are aware that CD-ROMs containing the pre-session documents are available. Since the paper consumption of documents for official meetings has been monitored only since 2007, the figures for 2006 are not available.

EFFORTS MADE AT COP-8 OFFSETS

    In March 2006, the CBD Secretariat and the Government of the State of Parana offered to plant eight million trees in excess of their projected reforestation activities in their State to offset the environmental impact of the Third Meeting of Parties to the Cartagena Protocol on Biosafety (MOP-3) and the Eight Conference of the Parties to the

    Convention on Biological Diversity (COP-8) both held in March in Curitiba, Brazil.

3.2. EFFORTS TOWARDS GREENING COP-9

    Germany is the host of COP-MOP4 and COP9. A comprehensive environmental plan has been established by the Host Government to ensure that environmental impacts resulting from the meeting are avoided or reduced, thus indirectly promoting the goals of the meeting. The main areas are waste management, environmentally sound mobility of participants, efficient use of energy and water and catering with a direct link to agro biodiversity.

THE GOVERNMENT OF GERMANYS INITIATIVES FOR COP-MOP4 AND COP9 OFFSETS

    The Article X of the Agreement between the Government of the Federal Republic of Germany and the Secretariat of the Convention on Biological Diversity regarding COP-9 reads as follows:

    “Article X

    Minimizing the impacts of the meetings

    The Government shall to its utmost and offset the negative impact of the Meetings on the environment in particular on biodiversity and its components, while raising awareness of delegates, contractors, staff and other partners about good practice. Sound environmental considerations should be borne in mind during all aspects of meeting organization: venue selection and construction, procurement, registration, catering, transporting, exhibitions, waste, accommodation etc. In line with the United Nations strategy for achieving climate neutrality, a particular emphasis should be given to first minimizing and then offsetting greenhouse gas emissions with the Meetings”.

Transport

    The transport concept aims at providing participants with a comprehensive range of environmentally friendly public transport modes for journeys to and from the meeting. Vehicles such as shuttle buses will be subject to particularly stringent environmental standards.

Signage

    Signage used for the various side-events and meetings should be reused at subsequent meetings, i.e. not made meeting or event specific.

Paper use and waste minimization and recycling

     11 This reads: In order to minimize the environmental impacts of the Secretariat‟s processes, and to contribute to the

    Secretary-General‟s initiative for a C-Neutral UN, this document is printed in limited numbers. Delegates are kindly requested to bring their copies to meetings and not to request additional copies”.

    /…

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