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GUIDE

By Jennifer Hawkins,2014-12-28 10:47
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GUIDE

    ENVIRONMENTAL

    HEALTH

    and

    SAFETY ISSUES

    IN SCHOOLS

    A Resource Handbook

    NEW JERSEY SCHOOL

    BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS

    ASSOCIATION

    TABLE OF CONTENTS

    ACID WASTE TANKS OIL INTERCEPTORS 3 AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT 4 AHERA - ASBESTOS 5 BACKFLOW PREVENTION TESTS 6 BLOODBORNE PATHOGENS 7 BLEACHER INSPECTIONS 8 BOILER LAWS 9 CEILING INSPECTIONS 11 CHEMICAL HYGIENE PLAN 12 CONFINED SPACE 13 ELECTROMAGNETIC FIELDS 14 ELEVATOR REGISTRATION/INSPECTION 15 EMERGENCY GENERATORS 16 EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLAN 18 FIRE DRILLS 19 FIRE EXTINGUISHERS 20 FIRE INSPECTIONS 21 FIREPROOF STAGE CURTAINS 22 FLUORESCENT BULB DISPOSAL 23 FOLDING DOOR INSPECTIONS 24 GREASE TRAP INTERCEPTORS 25 GREEN SEAL CERTIFIED CLEANING 26 HAZARDOUS WASTES 27 HEALTH INSPECTIONS 29 INDOOR AIR QUALITY 30 INTEGRATED PEST MANAGEMENT 32 KITCHEN HOODS 33 LEAD AND COPPER RULE 34 LEAD IN PAINT 35 LOCK OUT/TAG OUT 36 MERCURY VAPOR BULBS 37 NJ ADMINISTRATIVE CODE EDUCATION FACILITIES 38 NJ WORKER & COMMUNITY RIGHT TO KNOW 41 NOISE POLLUTION 42 PEOSH 43 PLAYGROUND SAFETY 45 POLYCHLORINATED BIPHENYLS (PCBs) 46 RADIUS (Stack Regulations) 47 RADON 48 RECYCLING 50 REFRIGERANT RECYCLING 51 REGISTERED MEDICAL WASTE 52 SEPTIC TANK MAINTENANCE 53 SEWERAGE TREATMENT PLANTS 54 SEXUAL HARASSMENT 55 SPRINKLER INSPECTIONS 56 UNDERGROUND STORAGE TANKS 57 VEHICLE IDLING 58 WATER TEST FOR SCHOOL OPERATED SYSTEM 59

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ACID WASTE TANKS / OIL INTERCEPTORS

    The EPA/CWW imposes strict limits on the concentrations of a range of hazardous substances in water run down sinks and floor drains.

ACID WASTE TANKS

    For years, limestone has been the treatment choice for laboratories. Limestone is an excellent neutralizer and is still common in small systems. In large systems, the long retention time requires large tanks with huge quantities of limestone and the weight of the limestone and bulky packaging makes the maintenance and replacement time consuming and expensive. Limestone reacts with the acid to form a salt sludge and over a period of time will disappear into the sewer. Open up a limestone tank at any high school, and you will probably find it empty. The tank becomes a dilution system once the limestone is consumed, and the acid waste remains untreated and flows directly to the sanitary sewer.

    Disposal of hazardous substances down sinks

    In essence, no waste (except wash water) should be run down sinks and drains. Where toxic substances are involved, even contaminated wash water may need to be collected and disposed by contractors. Where contamination is present, personal protective equipment suitable to the type of contaminant should be available and used at all times.

Maintenance must be completed as per manufacturer’s recommendations.

OIL INTERCEPTORS

    Oil interceptors operate on a gravity principle. That is, oil is lighter than water and will rise to the surface (static water level) inside of the interceptor as long as it has had enough time to stagnate. (This is related to proper sizing of the oil interceptor). The baffles inside the interceptor act to slow the water down and the holding capacity of the interceptor permits water to accumulate before exit to the sewer line. The time the water rests inside of the interceptor is "retention time" and is crucial to the proper performance of the interceptor because it gives time for the water to stagnate and for the oil to rise to the surface. Installed 1/8" above the static water line is an "adjustable draw-off valve". This valve is designed to skim the oil rising to the surface inside of the interceptor. The oil is "drawn-off" from the interceptor to a separate holding tank.

Maintenance must be completed as per manufacturer’s recommendations.

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AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT

ADA STANDARDS FOR ACCESSIBLE DESIGN

    Citation: 28 CFR Part 36, revised July 1, 1994

    This document sets guidelines for accessibility to places of public accommodation and commercial facilities by individuals with disabilities. These guidelines are to be applied during the design, construction, and alteration of such buildings and facilities to the extent required by regulations issued by Federal agencies, including the Department of Justice, under the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990.

    The ADA prohibits discrimination on the basis of disability in employment, State and local government, public accommodations, commercial facilities, transportation, and telecommunications. It also applies to the United States Congress.

    To be protected by the ADA, one must have a disability or have a relationship or association with an individual with a disability. An individual with a disability is defined by the ADA as a person who has a physical or mental impairment that substantially limits one or more major life activities, a person who has a history or record of such an impairment, or a person who is perceived by others as having such an impairment. The ADA does not specifically name all of the impairments that are covered.

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AHERA

Citation

Asbestos Hazard Emergency Response Act (A.H.E.R.A.), Federal Register:

    February 25, 1987; 40 CFR 763 Subpart G; N.J.A.C. 5:23-8, Subchapter 8 (Asbestos Hazard Abatement Subcode)

Synopsis

    AHERA (Asbestos Hazard Emergency Response Act) is a federally mandated program, signed into law in 1986, that was designed to provide a comprehensive framework for addressing asbestos problems in public, private, elementary and secondary schools. Asbestos is a versatile mineral that was used extensively in the past in building materials and automatic brake parts due to its qualities of heat resistance and noise reduction. However, those positive characteristics are now totally outweighed by the negative outcomes: exposure to asbestos causes lung diseases in the forms of asbestosis, lung cancer and mesothelioma.

    AHERA requires the initial development and adoption of an asbestos inspection and management plan, commonly referred to as the Management Plan. This plan locates and shows the condition of any asbestos-containing building materials (ACBMs) along with records of any abatement programs and/or fiber releases. Following adoption of the initial Plan, all school districts must conduct formal re-inspections every three years, along with six-month periodic surveillance, and must maintain appropriate records of these inspections.

    In addition to these requirements, new potentially-exposed employees must receive training within 60 days of being hired, and all potentially-exposed employees must be re-trained annually. School districts must also provide information to all employees on ACBMs and prepare notifications to be given to all contractors of their location and condition as well.

Regulating Agency/Contact Person

     Environmental Protection Agency, Region II

     Robert Fitzpatrick

     290 Broadway

     New York, NY 10007-1866

     (212) 637-4042

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BACKFLOW PREVENTION TESTS

This proposed amendment to N.J.A.C. 5:23-2.23(l) would require that backflow

    Preventers that are designed to be tested and used to isolate sources of contamination, as defined in the plumbing subcode, be tested at least once every 12 months in order to receive a certificate of compliance. The only exception would be testable backflow preventers installed on water supplies in one- or two-family dwellings.

    At present, this requirement applies only with respect to sources of high hazard contamination. This change would be consistent with section 10.5.6 of the National Standard Plumbing Code (NSPC). The technical provisions of the NSPC have been adopted as the plumbing subcode of the State Uniform Construction Code. Administrative provisions of the adopted model codes, however, are not adopted as part of the respective sub codes, so this amendment to the

    administrative rules of the State Uniform Construction Code is needed.

    As the Department has provided a 60-day comment period on this notice of proposal, this notice is exempted from the rulemaking calendar requirement, pursuant to

    N.J.A.C. 1:30-3.3(a)5.

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BLEACHER INSPECTIONS

QUESTIONS ABOUT BLEACHER INSPECTIONS

    Are there any printed requirements for bleacher inspections? YES

     Consumer Products Safety Commission

     NFPA 102; Section 4.5.1

     Americans with Disabilities Act

    Has the State of NJ adopted either of the guides as Law? NO

    Should you be inspecting bleachers for safety concerns? YES

YOUR INSURANCE COMPANY SURE HAS A POLICY!

    The simple answer YES to inspections of interior and exterior bleachers should be SELF EXPLAINITORY.

    Everyone should have a plan in place to address bleacher conditions, including;

    ; Periodic inspections for damage

    ; Visual identification of missing structural components

    ; Maintenance (tightening bolts, replacing end caps, handrails, cleaning)

    ; Repairs and Retrofits

    ; Overall Integrity of bleachers

HOW TO PROCEED

    1. Inventory and Identify all bleachers.

    2. Perform inspections.

    3. Attempt to identify manufacturer of the bleachers.

    4. Repair ant obvious deficiencies, missing and broken parts.

    5. Establish records of each bleacher including;

    a. Manufacturer

    b. Date purchased

    c. location

    d. maintenance and inspection history

    6. For Portable Bleachers, establish STANDARD OPERATING GUIDES for

    the relocation of bleachers following manufacturer guidelines.

    7. Establish a budget to replace non-compliant bleachers.

    8. Develop a specification to give to prospective vendors for the inspection

    services and report.

    9. Act on the recommendations and document your response.

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BLOODBORNE PATHOGENS

Citation

    OSHA Bloodborne Pathogens Standard, Title 29 Code of Federal Regulations 1910.1030

Synopsis

    A local Board of Education is committed to provide a safe and healthful work environment for the entire staff. In pursuit of this endeavor, an Exposure Control Plan (ECP) must be provided to eliminate or minimize occupational exposure to bloodborne pathogens. The ECP is a key document to assist the local Board of Education in implementing and ensuring compliance with the Standard. The ECP is generally developed by a school official in close cooperation with school nursing staff and the school medical officer. It will include:

    1. A determination of potentially-exposed employees;

    2. Procedures for evaluating the circumstances surrounding an exposure

    incident;

    3. The schedule and method for implementing specific requirements of

    the Standard, including:

    ; Methods of compliance

    ; Hepatitis B vaccinations and post-exposure follow-up

    ; Training and communication of hazards to employees

    ; Recordkeeping

     Regulating Agency/Contact Person

New Jersey Department of Health

    1-800-909-SHOT

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BOILER LAWS

Citation:

    N.J.A.C. 12:90-3.3 Equipment Requires Licensing

    N.J.A.C. 12:90-3.5 Licenses For Low Pressure Boilers

    N.J.A.C. 12:90-3.10 Duties Of Licensed Persons

    N.J.A.C. 12:90-4.10 Inspection of Boilers

Synopsis:

    A. All steam or hot water boilers or similar equipment potentially capable of

    generating steam as described in 12:90-4.10(b) shall be inspected and be

    subjected to a hydrostatic test, if necessary, at least once a year at 12 month

    intervals. This inspection shall be a complete internal and external inspection,

    as construction conditions will permit. All hot water heating boilers shall be

    inspected externally every 12 months.

    B. Equipment requiring inspection is outlined in section 12:90-4.10 (b), (d), (e),

    and (f).

    C. No person shall operate boiler equipment without the appropriate licenses as

    specified in NJAC 12:90-3.4 through 3.8. A boiler operator is required to be

    on site for an occupied building. An occupied building means a building that

    is occupied by persons other than custodial or security personnel. A building

    is not deemed to be occupied solely on the basis of attendance by custodial

    or security personnel.

    D. Each licensed person shall remain on the premises and shall determine how

    long he/she can stay away from equipment and not jeopardize the safe

    operation of a low pressure-heating boiler.

    E. The length of time during which a licensed person can be away from the

    equipment varies according to its nature, size and load conditions. AT THE

    MINIMUM, the operator shall monitor the conditions of the boiler plant AT

    LEAST ONCE EVERY TWO HOURS, consistent with the requirements set

    forth in N.J.A.C.12:90-3.3(a)2.

    F. A boiler operator’s log shall be maintained in each plant containing over 100

    HP. Every operator on the shift shall review the log and at the end of each

    shift sign the log. All logs shall include the;

    DATE

    NAME OF OPERATOR(S) ON DUTY

    TIME OF RELIEF

    Any personnel that are training to obtain their license under the

    requirements of N.J.A.C.12:90-7.4 shall include within the log the actual

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time spent as a trainee. When the operator of a low pressure plant is not

    in the boiler room as permitted, the operator shall indicate in the log,

    periodic tours of the boiler plant as required by the law.

Hard bound Log Books Required

ALL LOGS SHALL INCLUDE:

    ; NAME OF OPERATOR ON DUTY

    ; TIME OF RELIEF

    ; BOILER CHECKS AT A MINIMUM OF TWO HOURS.

    ; NAME OF TRAINEES AND HOURS

    ; ASME GUIDELINES OF ITEM CHECKED

    Regulating Agency:

    State of New Jersey, Department of Community Affairs Office of Boiler and Pressure Vessel Compliance PO Box 814

    Trenton, NJ 08625-0814

    Phone (609) 292-2345 Fax (609) 984-1577 Email: MWashington@DCA.State.NJ.US

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