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Futenma (Japan) negative

By Michael Jones,2014-11-25 18:40
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Futenma (Japan) negative

MGW 2010 Futenma (Japan) negative

    Gonzalez/Spring Lab

    Futenma (Japan) negative

    *****ALL PURPOSE LINK BOOSTER***** .......................................................................2 Link booster ........................................................................................................................................................... 3

    *****AT: ALLIANCE COLLAPSE ***** ..............................................................................4 1NC FRONTLINE NO ALLIANCE COLLAPSE ............................................................................................. 5-6

    No Alliance Collapse 2NC/1NR Ext #1/2 : China Threat ...................................................................................... 7

    No Alliance Collapse Ext: Threats ....................................................................................................................... 8

    No Alliance Collapse AT: Disagreements ............................................................................................................ 9

    No Alliance Collapse AT: Disagreements (Nye)................................................................................................. 10

    *****AT:JAPANESE NUCLEAR PROLIF**** .................................................................. 11 No Prolif ......................................................................................................................................................... 12-13

*****AT: DPJ***** ................................................................................................................ 14

    Economic Reforms Fail ................................................................................................................................... 15-18

    *****AT: DUGONG***** ..................................................................................................... 19 Species Defense ................................................................................................................................................... 20

    *****DISADVANTAGE LINKS***** .................................................................................. 21 Heg DA Links ...................................................................................................................................................... 22

    *****COUNTERPLANS***** .............................................................................................. 23 Public Diplomacy CP ........................................................................................................................................... 24

    Consult Japan ....................................................................................................................................................... 25

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MGW 2010 Futenma (Japan) negative

    Gonzalez/Spring Lab

    *****ALL PURPOSE LINK BOOSTER*****

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MGW 2010 Futenma (Japan) negative

    Gonzalez/Spring Lab

    Link booster

    Closing Futemna and stopping new base construction would catalyze anti-US military movements in Okinawa, leading to total US withdrawal.

    Feffer 10 (John Feffer 3-6-10 the co-director of Foreign Policy in Focus at the Institute for Policy Studies

    ―Okinawa and the new domino effect‖ http://www.atimes.com/atimes/Japan/LC06Dh02.html Wherever the US military puts down its foot overseas, movements have sprung up to protest the military, social, and environmental consequences

    of its military bases. This anti-base movement has notched some successes, such as the shut-down of a US navy facility in Vieques, Puerto Rico, in 2003. In the Pacific, too, the movement has made its mark. On the heels of the eruption of Mt Pinatubo, democracy activists in the Philippines successfully closed down the ash-covered Clark Air Force Base and Subic Bay Naval Station in 1991-1992. Later, South Korean activists managed to win closure of the huge Yongsan facility in downtown Seoul. Of course, these were only partial victories. Washington subsequently negotiated a Visiting Forces Agreement with the Philippines, whereby the US military has redeployed troops and equipment to the island, and replaced Korea's Yongsan base with a new one in nearby Pyeongtaek. But these not-in-my-backyard (NIMBY) victories were significant enough to help edge the Pentagon toward the adoption of a military doctrine that emphasizes mobility over position.

    The US military now relies on "strategic flexibility" and "rapid response" both to counter unexpected threats and to deal with allied fickleness. The Hatoyama government may indeed learn to say no to Washington over the Okinawa bases. Evidently

    considering this a likelihood, former deputy secretary of state and former US ambassador to Japan Richard Armitage has said that the

    United States "had better have a plan B". But the victory for the anti-base movement will still be only partial. US forces will remain in Japan, and especially Okinawa, and Tokyo will undoubtedly continue to pay for their maintenance. Buoyed by even this

    partial victory, however, NIMBY movements are likely to grow in Japan and across the region, focusing on other Okinawa bases, bases on the Japanese mainland, and elsewhere in the Pacific, including Guam. Indeed, protests are already building in Guam against the projected expansion of Andersen Air Force Base and Naval Base Guam to accommodate those Marines from Okinawa. And this strikes terror in the hearts of Pentagon planners. In World War II, the United States employed an island-hopping strategy to move ever closer to the Japanese mainland. Okinawa was the last island and last major battle of that campaign, and more people died during the fighting there than in the subsequent atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki combined: 12,000 US troops, more than 100,000 Japanese

    soldiers, and perhaps 100,000 Okinawan civilians. This historical experience has stiffened the pacifist resolve of Okinawans. The current battle over Okinawa again pits the United States against Japan, again with the Okinawans as victims. But there is a good chance that the Okinawans, like the Na'vi in that great NIMBY film Avatar, will win this time. A victory in

    closing Futenma and preventing the construction of a new base might be the first step in a potential reverse island hop. NIMBY movements may someday finally push the US military out of Japan and off Okinawa. It's not likely to be a smooth process, nor is it likely to happen any time soon. But the kanji (a form of Japanese writing) is on the wall. Even if the Yankees don't know what the Japanese characters mean, they can at least tell in which direction the exit arrow is pointing.

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MGW 2010 Futenma (Japan) negative

    Gonzalez/Spring Lab

    *****AT: ALLIANCE COLLAPSE *****

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MGW 2010 Futenma (Japan) negative

    Gonzalez/Spring Lab

    1NC FRONTLINE NO ALLIANCE COLLAPSE

1. No alliance collapse Chinese threat will always trump disagreements

New Straits Times 09 (November 19,

    http://www.koreatimes.co.kr/www/news/opinon/2010/05/171_55695.html)

    But political suspicions between Japan and China are a fact of life and, given Japanese apprehension of China's intentions as it grows not only economically but also militarily, Tokyo is unlikely to want to weaken its security relationship with Washington. Moreover, the US under the Obama administration is keen to make up for lost time

    and bolster its influence in East Asia. That being the case, the Japan-US relationship is likely to remain strong for as long as China remains viewed as a potential threat by Japan and other countries in East Asia.

2. Zero chance Japan breaks the alliance or goes nuclear too many security threats and

    economic interests

    Glosserman 09 (Brad - executive director of Pacific Forum CSIS, Korea Herald, Novermber 20, 2009,

    www.ifpa.org/pdf/RealignPriorities.pdf)

Ultimately, I don't worry about the future of the U.S.-Japan alliance because Japan doesn't have many viable

    security alternatives. Northeast Asia is a dangerous neighborhood. Japan's economy is reliant on trade and long,

    exposed sea lanes. While new and nontraditional security challenges are rising in significance, traditional state

    threats endure. North Korean rhetoric continues to be vitriolic and targets Japan. Relations with China have warmed,

    but they continue to be fraught. Japanese insecurities are magnified by China's rise and its growing confidence.

    There is a long list of issues that complicate that bilateral relationship and they will not be fixed by a change of government in Tokyo. Of course, Japan - like all other countries - has to engage China, but trust in China is a precious commodity - and it seems to be dwindling. This enduring suspicion is a powerful obstacle to the establishment of a new Japanese foreign policy. It has to be overcome if Asian nations are to build an Asian

    community. And, as in Europe, it will be overcome. But it will not go away. The U.S.-Japan alliance will provide Tokyo the sense of security that it needs to engage China and build that community. In theory, there is another

    Japanese option: an independent, self-reliant defense posture, which is usually code for going nuclear. That will not happen. Japanese strategists understand that the nuclear option does not serve their country's national interest. The public remains allergic to nuclear weapons. Japan would only go nuclear as a last resort, as an act of desperation if the alliance with the U.S. were to dissolve. And Tokyo knows well that going nuclear would end its alliance. Thus, for reasons positive and negative, alliance with the U.S. makes the most sense for Japan. That does not mean that the alliance is perfect as is. It must be modernized and adapted to new realities, within Japan, the U.S. and in the region. That process is underway. It has been and will continue to be messy. But the fundamental interests of Japan and the U.S. remain aligned. The alliance continues to serve both well, as President Obama's recent visit makes clear.

    It will endure.

3. Public Japanese support for the alliance is strong, preventing collapse

Hughes 09 (Christopher Hughes, Prof., International Politics, U. of Warwick, UK, JAPANS

    REMILITARIZATION, 2009, 134)

Japanese support for the US alliance has grown since the 1980s, with those viewing it as functioning effectively for

    Japan's security rising to a high of 75% by 2006. Public approval of a combination of the JSDF and the US--Japan

    security treaty as the best means to ensure national security has risen, from 40% in the 1970s to close to 80% in 2006.

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MGW 2010 Futenma (Japan) negative

    Gonzalez/Spring Lab

    1NC FRONTLINE NO ALLIANCE COLLAPSE

4. New agreement and new Japanese leadership solves the Alliance is back on safe footing

    Denmark and Kliman 2010 (Abraham M. Denmark is a Fellow at CNAS. Dr. Daniel M. Kliman is a Visiting

    Fellow at CNAS. ―Cornerstone: A Future Agenda for the U.S.-Japan Alliance‖

    Center for New American Security June)

    The election of the Democratic Party of Japan (DPJ) on August 30, 2009 inaugurated a new phase in the U.S.-Japan alliance. After coming to power, the DPJ embarked on a foreign policy emphasizing Japan‘s relations with East Asia and calling for a ―more equal‖ alliance with the United States. Although this rhetoric unnerved some in Washington, what most troubled the alliance was the DPJ‘s attempt to fulfill a campaign pledge by renegotiating a 2006

    agreement with the United States that called for closing Futenma, a U.S. Marine base in Okinawa, and building a

    new runway in the waters off Camp Schwab another U.S. Marine base on the island. The U.S. government initially

    resisted the DPJ‘s bid to reopen negotiations over Futenma, arguing that an agreement was already in place and revisions would jeopardize the entire effort to transfer U.S. forces out of Japan to reduce the basing footprint there.1 Frustration mounted in Washington and Tokyo, and some observers voiced concerns about an alliance adrift.2 The

    United States and Japan remained at odds over Futenma for nine months until a combination of intensive U.S.

    diplomacy and growing disenchantment in Japan with then Prime Minister Yukio Hatoyama‘s handling of the

    alliance finally broke the impasse. The new agreement, issued in May 2010 via a joint statement that reaffirmed the 2006 accord, clearly weakened Hatoyama. With his support in freefall, his governing coalition in revolt, and elections for Japan‘s Upper House scheduled in July 2010, Hatoyama resigned shortly thereafter. Although the new

    agreement will likely face consid- erable resistance from vocal opposition groups in Okinawa, it nonetheless removes a major roadblock to advancing the alliance on other fronts. The agreement on Futenma coupled with

    Hatoyama‘s resignation heralded the end of a tur- bulent period. An alliance agenda once consumed by Futenma is

    now open to more productive pur- suits. And in newly chosen Prime Minister Naoto Kan, Washington has a new partner in Tokyo who does not carry the baggage of Hatoyama‘s approach to Futenma, is more experienced, and, by many accounts, operates more pragmatically than his predecessor.3 Thus, the 50th anniversary of the alliance‘s founding, until recently considered a squandered opportunity, can still serve as a spring- board for adapting the alliance for the political and strategic challenges of the 21st century.

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MGW 2010 Futenma (Japan) negative

    Gonzalez/Spring Lab

    No Alliance Collapse 2NC/1NR Ext #1/2 : China Threat

China threat will always outweigh and prevent alliance collapse that’s 1NC 1 and 2, New

    Straits Times and Glosserman ’09.

Japan isn’t stupid and the perceived threat of China’s military and economic rise and other

    Asian challengers will overwhelm disagreements between Japan and the US. Multiple key warrants:

    1. Obama is keen to keep the alliance strong he’ll do the work to preserve it

    2. Japanese apprehension toward China is a fact of life and won’t go away

    3. Japan lacks viable security alternative to the alliance

    4. Fundamental security interests will overwhelm any frictions

Three reasons to prefer our arguments:

    1. Context - they take the entire context of the relationship into account

    2. Most qualified Glosserman’s the executive director of the Pacific Forum at the

    CSIS

    3. Consensus - the overwhelming majority of experts and government officials agree

    that fear of China will keep the alliance in place

    Tisdall 3/8/10 (Simon, assist. Editor and foreign affairs columnist, ―china threat can heal us-japan rift‖

    The Guardian UK, http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/2010/mar/08/china-us-

    alliance-under-pressure)

    The Okinawa dispute reflects broader differences. Hatoyama's view that Japan needs a more "balanced"

    relationship with Washington after 65 years of polite subservience in the security sphere, and his related

    interest in developing an EEC-style east Asian economic community including China, have produced

    sharply critical reactions in Washington. "The relationship between the US and Japan is in its worst state

    ever," said Hisahiko Okazaki, a former ambassador, in the daily newspaper Sankei Shimbun. "The Japan-

    US alliance is too valuable an asset to lose," he wrote. Despite such dramatic huffing and puffing, the

    bottom-line reality, say senior foreign ministry officials, former and serving ministers, and leading

    commentators, is there is not the remotest chance that the security alliance will be "lost". It may be adapted

    or modified. It may evolve. And for its part, says former deputy foreign minister Hitoshi Tanaka, Japan

    "needs to think seriously about how it can better contribute to international security" and "to consider if it is

    still right to stick to the existing interpretation of the constitutional prohibition on the use of force". But the

    official consensus is firm that the US relationship will continue to form the "cornerstone" of Japan's

    defences, as foreign minister Katsuya Okada put it a position shared by Hatoyama.The main reason

    behind this confidence that, despite all the stresses and strains, the alliance will endure is not hard to

    discern: growing mutual fear of China.

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MGW 2010 Futenma (Japan) negative

    Gonzalez/Spring Lab

    No Alliance Collapse Ext: Threats

Security needs trump Japanese resentment of the US military presence the Alliance isn’t

    breaking

    Nina Hachigian, (Sr. Vice President, Center for American Progress & Former Analyst, RAND Corp.), THE NEXT AMERICAN CENTURY, 2008, 145.

Unlike the others, Japan is hanging on to the U.S. alliance for dear life. The Japanese are no longer worried, as they

    were in the 1980s, that the U.S. will try to keep them down (though they still resent it). There is a broad consensus in Japan that no strategic option is more attractive or viable than sticking to the U.S. like glue. With a growing China and a nuclear North Korea on their doorstep, Japan needs to keep America close.

Disputes won’t hurt the alliance – security threats overwhelm

Muthiah Alagappa, (Sr. Fellow, East-West Center), THE LONG SHADOW: NUCLEAR WEAPONS AND

    SECURITY IN 21ST CENTURY ASIA, 2008, 58.

    Except for a brief period in the early 1990s, Tokyo has all along viewed the security treaty with the United States as the cornerstone of its security policy. Growing concern about a rising and nationalist China, as well as North Korea, has renewed emphasis on the U.S.-Japan security treaty. Despite Japanese concerns of entrapment and a desire for greater autonomy, the U.S.-Japan security treaty is likely to endure and become more equal.

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MGW 2010 Futenma (Japan) negative

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    No Alliance Collapse AT: Disagreements

Alliance will never collapse in spite of disputes, common interests overwhelm

    Faleomavaega 09 (Eni H., US Rep from Delaware, ―Japan‘s Changing Role,‖ Congressional Hearing, June

    25, http://findarticles.com/p/news-articles/political-transcript-

    wire/mi_8167/is_20090629/del-eni-faleomavaega-holds-hearing/ai_n50893710/pg_4/)

    In conclusion, it's important that the U.S. and Japan, the world's two largest economies, not turn inward in a time of crisis. Even though domestic political realignment in Japan may cause a period of minor frictions in the traditional security agenda, our common interest is overwhelming and the alliance is likely to prosper unless we handle things very poorly.

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MGW 2010 Futenma (Japan) negative

    Gonzalez/Spring Lab

    No Alliance Collapse AT: Disagreements (Nye)

Mutual security interests overwhelm political disputes

Nye 09 (Joseph Nye, Harvard JFK School, June 25 2009, DEL. ENI H. FALEOMAVAEGA HOLDS A

    HEARING ON JAPAN'S CHANGING ROLE, Political Transcript Wire, June 29, 2009 p lexis)

Subsequently, as Bill Emmett has pointed out in his recent book, "The Rivals", if you look at the rise of Asia, not

    just as the rise of China, but also the rise of India, you'll find that there is balance within Asia. And the important

    thing for us is not to contain China or to treat China as an enemy, but to hedge against the possibility that at some time in the future, we would face, what you describe. And, that policy, as Mike Green said, has worked on a

    bipartisan basis. It has good bipartisan support. And, I think it is the right policy. It gives us the best options for a better future. And, it also is good for Japan. Because Japan, if we have a problem of thinking about the rise of

    Chinese power, Japan has it immediately, it's right next door. And, that's why, I think, the U.S-Japan alliance, despite the frictions that are bound to occur as we see this political change that my colleagues have then described, I

    think that is not going to threaten the alliance, because it's so strongly in the interest of both Japan and the United States. So, this is why I concluded my testimony by saying, I'm relatively optimistic. Not just about the U.S.-Japan alliance, but about the potential for a stable east Asia, if we play our cards right.

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