DOC

Emergency Management and Homeland Security

By Ethel Henry,2014-11-11 22:33
17 views 0
Emergency Management and Homeland Security

This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency

    Managers (IAEM). If you’re interested in learning more about IAEM, please visit our website

    at: http://www.iaem.com/

    Emergency Management and Homeland Security

    Articles of Interest 2-1-08

    (The articles, reports and additional information contained in this edition were collected from 1-25

    to 2-1)

    “Be careful when you fight the monsters, lest you become one.”

    Friedrich Nietzsche

    U.S. News Reports

Emergency Management and Homeland Security

    Md. Task Forces Hears From Industry on Need for Stronger Structures http://www.insurancejournal.com/news/east/2007/10/04/84022.htm

Risks don't end at state line

    http://www.sptimes.com/2007/04/16/Opinion/Risks_don_t_end_at_st.shtml

Natural catastrophe figures for 2007

    http://finchannel.com/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=3446&Itemid=51

HUD OKs diverting Katrina housing funds

    http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20080125/ap_on_re_us/katrina_housing

Hired in December, island emergency management director resigns to return to Texas (South

    Carolina)

    http://www.islandpacket.com/news/local/story/142274.html

    Collateral Damage: Surveillance Aimed at Terrorists Can Easily Go Awry http://www.cqpolitics.com/wmspage.cfm?docID=hsnews-000002661145

More firefighters, gear, panel asks (California)

    http://www.latimes.com/news/local/la-me-fire26jan26,1,2145351.story

Rejection of fire levy plan urged (California)

    http://www.latimes.com/news/local/la-me-insurance26jan26,1,7027429.story

Missouri Receives High Marks on Emergency Preparedness

    http://www.govtech.com/em/articles/258775

    Orlando airport's efforts fail to prevent gun, drug smuggling (Florida) http://www.orlandosentinel.com/news/local/orange/orl-oiasecurity2808jan28,0,7422012.story

Homeland Security to boost staffing at 'fusion centers'

    http://www.govexec.com/story_page.cfm?articleid=39121&dcn=todaysnews

Cira resigns as FEMA's CIO

    http://www.fcw.com/online/news/151433-1.html

    "Safety Net" Grant Program May Help Disaster Applicants (Washington) http://www.fema.gov/news/newsrelease.fema?id=42366

    Disclaimer: The information included in this document does not necessarily represent the 1 opinions of the editor of this document or IAEM. Steve Detwiler or IAEM do not endorse or

    support any agency, organization, or company that posts or distributes this document.

    This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency Managers (IAEM). If you’re interested in learning more about IAEM, please visit our website

    at: http://www.iaem.com/

LE fire chief named state coordinator for mutual aid (Texas)

    http://www.littleelmjournal.net/articles/2008/01/28/little_elm_journal/news/a-newsle85.txt

Hawaii health officials preparing for the worst

    http://starbulletin.com/2008/01/27/news/story03.html

TSA tester slips mock bomb past airport security

    http://www.cnn.com/2008/US/01/28/tsa.bombtest/index.html

Coast Guard report faults spill response (California)

    http://www.latimes.com/news/local/la-me-oilspill29jan29,1,1149860.story

GAO to Customs: Improve cargo assessments

    http://www.fcw.com/online/news/151446-1.html?topic=homeland_security

    DHS Designates President's State of the Union Address as National Special Security Event http://www.govtech.com/em/articles/259586

    SF's head of disaster preparedness will resign (San Francisco, California) http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2008/01/29/BATNUNV9U.DTL

Wanted: New state emergency chief (Rhode Island)

    http://www.projo.com/news/content/ema_posting_01-29-08_MR8PQFD_v44.26c322d.html

    Consulting firm hires emergency director fired by governor (Rhode Island) http://www.eyewitnessnewstv.com/global/story.asp?s=7794596

ASCE and IAEM sign memorandum of cooperation.

    http://news.thomasnet.com/companystory/539188

Survey Shows Most Georgians Aren't Prepared to Survive Emergency

    http://www.myfoxatlanta.com/myfox/pages/News/Detail?contentId=5607197&version=1&locale=EN-US&layoutCode=VSTY&pageId=3.2.1

    Perdue announces disaster preparation plan; Hall ahead of the game (Georgia) http://www.accessnorthga.com/detail.php?n=206288

    Public Alert Systems Partners with Florida Police Chiefs Education & Research Foundation to Offer Web-Based Cell Phone/Email Alert System

    http://www.centredaily.com/business/technology/story/361081.html

Staging the Largest Terrorism-Response Drill in U.S. History

    http://www.wired.com/politics/security/magazine/16-02/ps_homeland

County names director of emergency management (Pennsylvania)

    http://www.mcall.com/news/local/all-b3_3mateff.6250031jan30,0,6950211.story?track=rss

Lt. Gov. Judge appointed to FEMA regional council (Iowa)

    http://www.desmoinesregister.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20080130/NEWS/80130007

    Louisiana State Judiciary Turns to AtHoc to Provide Centralized Emergency Warning System for Employees

    http://biz.yahoo.com/iw/080130/0354708.html

    Disclaimer: The information included in this document does not necessarily represent the 2 opinions of the editor of this document or IAEM. Steve Detwiler or IAEM do not endorse or

    support any agency, organization, or company that posts or distributes this document.

    This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency Managers (IAEM). If you’re interested in learning more about IAEM, please visit our website

    at: http://www.iaem.com/

    American Hospital Association Endorses 3n to Assist Hospitals with Emergency Communication Needs

    http://biz.yahoo.com/iw/080130/0353291.html

TEMS gets Homeland Security grant (Ohio)

    http://www.hsconnect.com/news/articles.asp?articleID=21552

    Statewide communications system won't take away Hampshire fire unit's ability to talk with Virginia companies

    http://www.times-news.com/local/local_story_028115312.html

Air Force bases fight to claim Cyber Command

    http://www.fcw.com/online/news/151420-1.html?topic=state_and_local

Trains, bloggers are threats in US drill

    http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20080131/ap_on_go_ca_st_pe/cyber_storm;_ylt=Ariq_kJB2Mancm_pqxv81Nes0NUE

Senate bill would bar certain gun restrictions (Utah)

    http://deseretnews.com/article/1,5143,695247105,00.html

Election bill aimed at big loss scenario (Colorado)

    http://www.rockymountainnews.com/news/2008/jan/28/in-case-of-disaster/

Homeland-security measure still on hold (Arizona)

    http://www.azcentral.com/news/articles/0129securityforces0129.html

ODNI releases standards for suspicious-activity reporting

    http://www.fcw.com/online/news/151462-1.html?topic=homeland_security

    Disaster Readiness Webinar for State and Local Government Features Director of Office of Emergency Preparedness for City of New Orleans

    http://www.govtech.com/em/articles/260257

    State and Federal Officials Announce Funding for New Orleans Fire Stations (Louisiana) http://www.fema.gov/news/newsrelease.fema?id=42420

TSA launches airport security blog

    http://www.govexec.com/story_page.cfm?articleid=39169&sid=60

Report: Military not prepared for homeland attack

    http://www.govexec.com/story_page.cfm?articleid=39177&dcn=todaysnews

More Cities to Get Counterterror Money

    http://ap.google.com/article/ALeqM5jQ0Ao4X0-a32dSRsZ9upSawSrPdgD8UH39J80

Officials spell out N.J.'s need for Homeland Security funds

    http://www.northjersey.com/news/northernnj/13928257.html

Homeland security's evil twin

    http://www.startribune.com/entertainment/books/13949731.html

    Disclaimer: The information included in this document does not necessarily represent the 3 opinions of the editor of this document or IAEM. Steve Detwiler or IAEM do not endorse or

    support any agency, organization, or company that posts or distributes this document.

    This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency Managers (IAEM). If you’re interested in learning more about IAEM, please visit our website

    at: http://www.iaem.com/

Regional evacuation study under way (Florida)

    http://www.pensacolanewsjournal.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20080127/NEWS01/801270331

Homeland security, EMA to align (Memphis, Tennessee)

    http://commercialappeal.com/news/2008/jan/27/homeland-security-ema-to-align/?partner=yahoo

Homeland chief to visit NPS

    http://www.montereyherald.com/ci_8085276?source=rss&nclick_check=1

State money helps support rural emergency services (Pennsylvania)

    http://www.sungazette.com/page/content.detail/id/504588.html?nav=5011

    Enright & Associates, Inc. Announces Formation of Emergency Management Consulting Group http://prweb.com/releases/2008/1/prweb656473.htm

    Former FEMA Secretary Mike Brown will Offer His Perspective on Hurricane Katrina Recovery Efforts at the IACSP Wash DC Security Forum

    http://prweb.com/releases/2008/1/prweb649691.htm

Illegal Aliens Rear End Homeland Security Vehicle (Arizona)

    http://news.ktar.com/?nid=6&sid=716522

O’Hare’s upgraded Security (Illinois)

    http://cbs2chicago.com/local/fingerprinting.ohare.airport.2.640834.html

Tight security, but no specific threat for Super Bowl (Arizona)

    http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20080129/ts_alt_afp/amfootnflsupersecurity1_080129222357

American Red Cross Opens Nominations for 2008 Clara Barton Awards

    http://www.santapaulatimes.com/news/fullstory.php/aid/15422/American_Red_Cross_Opens_Nominations_for_2008_Clara_Barton_Awards.html

Central Ohio Strike Team prepared for anything

    http://www.mountvernonnews.com/local/08/01/30/strike.team.html

Mine safety agency OKs wireless tracker

    http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/22940544/

DHS to promote Charbo

    http://www.fcw.com/online/news/151508-1.html?topic=homeland_security

DHS 2009 budget request seeks $12B for border security, immigration

    http://www.fcw.com/online/news/151505-1.html?topic=homeland_security

IG: DHS suffers from poor management

    http://www.fcw.com/online/news/151504-1.html?topic=homeland_security

DHS chief eases enforcement of new border crossing rules

    http://www.govexec.com/story_page.cfm?articleid=39190&sid=60

GETTING THE 411

    http://firechief.com/hazmat/disaster-management/intelligence-community-information-sharing-0101/

    Disclaimer: The information included in this document does not necessarily represent the 4 opinions of the editor of this document or IAEM. Steve Detwiler or IAEM do not endorse or

    support any agency, organization, or company that posts or distributes this document.

    This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency Managers (IAEM). If you’re interested in learning more about IAEM, please visit our website

    at: http://www.iaem.com/

Mystery Pretexters Targeting Emergency Responders

    http://blog.wired.com/27bstroke6/2008/01/pretexters-targ.html

Confronting terror, calmly

    http://www.latimes.com/news/printedition/front/la-na-jenkins31jan31,1,3566850.story

Three Emergency Directors on the Move

    http://firechief.com/news/Directors_move_0128/

Bush Order Expands Network Monitoring

    Intelligence Agencies to Track Intrusions

    By Ellen Nakashima

    Washington Post Staff Writer

    Saturday, January 26, 2008; A03

    President Bush signed a directive this month that expands the intelligence community's role in monitoring Internet traffic to protect against a rising number of attacks on federal agencies' computer systems.

    The directive, whose content is classified, authorizes the intelligence agencies, in particular the National Security Agency, to monitor the computer networks of all federal agencies -- including ones they have not previously monitored.

    Until now, the government's efforts to protect itself from cyber-attacks -- which run the gamut from hackers to organized crime to foreign governments trying to steal sensitive data -- have been piecemeal. Under the new initiative, a task force headed by the Office of the Director of National Intelligence (ODNI) will coordinate efforts to identify the source of cyber-attacks against government computer systems. As part of that effort, the Department of Homeland Security will work to protect the systems and the Pentagon will devise strategies for counterattacks against the intruders.

    There has been a string of attacks on networks at the State, Commerce, Defense and Homeland Security departments in the past year and a half. U.S. officials and cyber-security experts have said Chinese Web sites were involved in several of the biggest attacks back to 2005, including some at the country's nuclear-energy labs and large defense contractors.

    The NSA has particular expertise in monitoring a vast, complex array of communications systems -- traditionally overseas. The prospect of aiming that power at domestic networks is raising concerns, just as the NSA's role in the government's warrantless domestic-surveillance program has been controversial.

    "Agencies designed to gather intelligence on foreign entities should not be in charge of monitoring our computer systems here at home," said Rep. Bennie Thompson (D-Miss.), chairman of the House Homeland Security Committee. Lawmakers with oversight of homeland security and intelligence matters say they have pressed the administration for months for details. The classified joint directive, signed Jan. 8 and called the National Security Presidential Directive 54/Homeland Security Presidential Directive 23, has not been previously disclosed. Plans to expand the NSA's role in cyber-security were reported in the Baltimore Sun in September.

    Disclaimer: The information included in this document does not necessarily represent the 5 opinions of the editor of this document or IAEM. Steve Detwiler or IAEM do not endorse or

    support any agency, organization, or company that posts or distributes this document.

    This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency Managers (IAEM). If you’re interested in learning more about IAEM, please visit our website

    at: http://www.iaem.com/

    According to congressional aides and former White House officials with knowledge of the program, the directive outlines measures collectively referred to as the "cyber initiative," aimed at securing the government's computer systems against attacks by foreign adversaries and other intruders. It will cost billions of dollars, which the White House is expected to request in its fiscal 2009 budget.

    "The president's directive represents a continuation of our efforts to secure government networks, protect against constant intrusion attempts, address vulnerabilities and anticipate future threats," said White House spokesman Scott Stanzel. He would not discuss the initiative's details. The initiative foreshadows a policy debate over the proper role for government as the Internet becomes more dangerous.

    Supporters of cyber-security measures say the initiative falls short because it doesn't include the private sector -- power plants, refineries, banks -- where analysts say 90 percent of the threat exists.

    "If you don't include industry in the mix, you're keeping one of your eyes closed because the hacking techniques are likely the same across government and commercial organizations," said Alan Paller, research director at the SANS Institute, a Bethesda-based cyber-security group that assists companies that face attacks. "If you're looking for needles in the haystack, you need as much data as you can get because these are really tiny needles, and bad guys are trying to hide the needles."

    Under the initiative, the NSA, CIA and the FBI's Cyber Division will investigate intrusions by monitoring Internet activity and, in some cases, capturing data for analysis, sources said. The Pentagon can plan attacks on adversaries' networks if, for example, the NSA determines that a particular server in a foreign country needs to be taken down to disrupt an attack on an information system critical to the U.S. government. That could include responding to an attack against a private-sector network, such as the telecom industry's, sources said. Also, as part of its attempt to defend government computer systems, the Department of Homeland Security will collect and monitor data on intrusions, deploy technologies for preventing attacks and encrypt data. It will also oversee the effort to reduce Internet portals across government to 50 from 2,000, to make it easier to detect attacks.

    "The government has taken a solid step forward in trying to develop cyber-defenses," said Paul B. Kurtz, a security consultant and former special adviser to the president on critical infrastructure protection. Kurtz said the initiative's purpose is not to spy on Americans. "The thrust here is to protect networks."

    One of the key questions is whether it is necessary to read communications to investigate an intrusion.

    Ed Giorgio, a former NSA analyst who is now a security consultant for ODNI, said, "If you're looking inside a DoD system and you see data flows going to China, that ought to set off a red flag. You don't need to scan the content to determine that."

    But often, traffic analysis is not enough, some experts said. "Knowing the content -- that a communication is sensitive -- allows proof positive that something bad is going out of that

    Disclaimer: The information included in this document does not necessarily represent the 6 opinions of the editor of this document or IAEM. Steve Detwiler or IAEM do not endorse or

    support any agency, organization, or company that posts or distributes this document.

    This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency Managers (IAEM). If you’re interested in learning more about IAEM, please visit our website

    at: http://www.iaem.com/

    computer," said one cyber-security expert who spoke on the condition of anonymity because of the initiative's sensitivity.

    Allowing a spy agency to monitor domestic networks is worrisome, said James X. Dempsey, policy director of the Center for Democracy and Technology. "We're concerned that the NSA is claiming such a large role over the security of unclassified systems," he said. "They are a spy agency as well as a communications security agency. They operate in total secrecy. That's not necessary and not the most effective way to protect unclassified systems."

    A proposal last year by the White House Homeland Security Council to put the Department of Homeland Security in charge of the initiative was resisted by national security agencies on the grounds that the department, established in 2003, lacked the necessary expertise and authority. The tug-of-war lasted weeks and was resolved only recently, several sources said.

FEMA's Image Still Tarnished by Katrina

    By Stephen Barr

    Tuesday, January 29, 2008; D04

    Well, not every agency can be popular with the public.

    Less than half of Americans in a national survey said they hold favorable views of the Federal Emergency Management Agency, a sign that the Bush administration's sluggish response to Hurricane Katrina continues to shape perceptions of the agency.

    FEMA came in last, for a second consecutive year, in the survey, which asked respondents to give their views of 22 agencies. The top ratings went to the U.S. Postal Service, the National Park Service and the U.S. Forest Service.

    The survey was conducted by GfK Roper Consulting, a market research firm that has studied consumer trends since 1973. The firm conducted in-person interviews with 2,002 adults in August and September to collect their views toward federal agencies, and provided results to reporters last week.

    In the survey, 42 percent viewed FEMA favorably, slightly higher than the 38 percent who had a favorable view of the agency in 2006.

    But the positive responses toward the agency were down from 61 percent in 2004, the year before Katrina slammed into New Orleans and other Gulf Coast communities, and from 63 percent in 2001.

    "The erosion in their favorability, if you look at the trend, is probably because of Katrina, a highly publicized event," said Kathy Sheehan, senior vice president at GfK Roper.

    FEMA, a part of the Department of Homeland Security, said in a statement that "we recognize that it is going to take time and continued proof by example to rebuild our image and the confidence of the American people."

    Disclaimer: The information included in this document does not necessarily represent the 7 opinions of the editor of this document or IAEM. Steve Detwiler or IAEM do not endorse or

    support any agency, organization, or company that posts or distributes this document.

    This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency Managers (IAEM). If you’re interested in learning more about IAEM, please visit our website

    at: http://www.iaem.com/

    The agency said it is taking steps to improve, and it has hired experts and experienced regional directors. FEMA has scored highly in satisfaction surveys of people who register for disaster assistance, the agency noted.

    Even as it tries to repair perceptions, FEMA may find it difficult to vault into the top tier of agencies that got high marks in the survey. Agencies that interact regularly with the public tend to get higher favorability ratings, Sheehan said.

    In the survey, 83 percent held a favorable view of the Postal Service, 79 percent were positive toward the National Park Service and 75 percent liked the Forest Service.

    The survey also showed that many people do not have opinions about some agencies, and that works against them in such rankings, Sheehan said. For example, about a third of the survey respondents answered "don't know" when asked their opinion of the Bureau of Land Management, which oversees public lands primarily in the West, and the Administration on Aging, a part of the Health and Human Services Department. Twenty-eight percent responded "don't know" when asked their opinion of the Securities and Exchange Commission, which looks out for investors in the stock market.

    Some of the 22 agencies in the survey ask GfK Roper to track the public's view, and other agencies are included to give researchers "a sense of where the public sentiment is," Sheehan said.

    As might be expected, the Food and Drug Administration and the National Institutes of Health, which strive to protect the public from harmful products and disease, rated higher than the CIA, which is often engulfed in controversy, and the Internal Revenue Service, which collects taxes. In general, large companies fared better with the public than federal agencies. Home Depot, Hershey, General Mills, Kodak, Clorox, automobile manufacturers and retail chains were rated more favorably than most federal agencies.

    "It definitely shows there is room for improvement" by federal agencies, Sheehan said. Retirements

    Emmett I. Aldrich, director of human resources at the Housing and Urban Development Department, retired Jan. 3 after 42 years of federal service. He also worked at the departments of Interior and Transportation, the old Bureau of Mines and the old Civil Service Commission. Dennis Heretick, chief information security officer at the Justice Department, will retire Feb. 2 after 40 years of service. He played a key role in cyber-security planning for federal agencies.

    Disclaimer: The information included in this document does not necessarily represent the 8 opinions of the editor of this document or IAEM. Steve Detwiler or IAEM do not endorse or

    support any agency, organization, or company that posts or distributes this document.

    This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency Managers (IAEM). If you’re interested in learning more about IAEM, please visit our website

    at: http://www.iaem.com/

January 26, 2008

    Memo Details Objections to Command Center Site (New York City, NY)

    By WILLIAM K. RASHBAUM

    The New York Police Department produced a detailed analysis in 1998 opposing plans by the city to locate its emergency command center at the World Trade Center, but the Giuliani administration overrode those objections. The command center later collapsed from damage in the Sept. 11 terrorist attack.

    ―Seven World Trade Center is a poor choice for the site of a crucial command center for the top leadership of the City of New York,‖ a panel of police experts, which was aided by the Secret

    Service, concluded in a confidential Police Department memorandum.

    The memorandum, which has not been previously disclosed, cited a number of ―significant points of vulnerability.‖ Those included: the building’s public access, the center’s location on the 23rd floor, a 1,200-gallon diesel fuel supply for its generator, a large garage and delivery bays, the building’s history as a terrorist target, and its placement above and adjacent to a Consolidated Edison substation that provided much of the power for Lower Manhattan.

    Rudolph W. Giuliani, the mayor then, has acknowledged some police skepticism about the site, but he has described it as resulting from a jurisdictional dispute between police officials and his emergency management director, who had played a role in selecting the site.

    The eight-page memo reveals that police officials asked a variety of in-house experts in various disciplines and an outside expert to prepare a detailed analysis of the site’s vulnerabilities.

    The decision to put the command center in the trade center has been a continuing source of discomfort for Mr. Giuliani, whose expertise and preparedness as a leader in a time of crisis has been the chief element in his campaign for the Republican presidential nomination. The site was completed in the summer of 1999 and was destroyed when the 47-story building at 7 World Trade Center collapsed on Sept. 11 after a fire there burned for much of the day. ―This group’s finding is that the security of the proposed O.E.M. Command Center cannot be

    reasonably guaranteed,‖ the commander of the intelligence division, Daniel J. Oates, wrote in the July 15, 1998, memo to the police commissioner.

    The memo said the conclusions were based on analysis by police officials with expertise in infrastructure, building security, explosives, traffic and ventilation systems, who also consulted the Secret Service, including the agency’s New York special agent in charge, Chip Smith.

    Disclaimer: The information included in this document does not necessarily represent the 9 opinions of the editor of this document or IAEM. Steve Detwiler or IAEM do not endorse or

    support any agency, organization, or company that posts or distributes this document.

    This service is brought to in cooperation with the International Association of Emergency Managers (IAEM). If you’re interested in learning more about IAEM, please visit our website

    at: http://www.iaem.com/

    ―Mr. Smith agrees with this assessment,‖ the memo says in its concluding paragraph, ―even though his own office is in Seven World Trade Center. He acknowledges that the security of his office is a continuing concern because of the public nature of the building and the other reasons specified in this report.‖

    The memorandum was provided to The New York Times by a law enforcement official not affiliated with a rival political campaign.

    Mr. Giuliani received a briefing on the Police Department’s recommendations, but it is unclear whether he received a copy of the memorandum.

    Mr. Giuliani has said in the past that one of the reasons for choosing the location was that several federal agencies with which city officials needed to be in contact during emergencies, including the Secret Service, had their offices there. Other federal agencies in the building included the Defense Department and the C.I.A.

    But the Police Department took the opposite position in the memo, saying the presence of those agencies made the building a more likely target.

    Mr. Giuliani’s campaign declined on Friday to answer questions about the memo. But Maria

    Comella, a campaign spokeswoman, said the Giuliani administration had considered 50 different sites and examined a variety of factors before selecting the trade center.

    ―This is one memo out of a variety of memos that were presented,‖ she said.

    Two years ago, in their book, ―Grand Illusion,‖ Wayne Barrett and Dan Collins described the vehement objections to the choice raised by Police Commissioner Howard Safir and Chief of Department Louis R. Anemone. The memo from the Intelligence Division lays out what appears to have been the foundation for their arguments against the location.

    Mr. Safir, who now operates a private security company and has supported Mr. Giuliani’s candidacy, did not a return a call seeking comment.

    In response to questions about the site selection, Mr. Giuliani has typically said he relied on his emergency management director, Jerome M. Hauer, to find the best site and suggested he had little role in the process.

    Mr. Hauer, however, has publicly disputed Mr. Giuliani’s assertion, saying that although he helped pick the site, he did so only after mayoral aides had told him the command center had to be within walking distance of City Hall. He has said he originally recommended a site in Brooklyn.

    Disclaimer: The information included in this document does not necessarily represent the 10 opinions of the editor of this document or IAEM. Steve Detwiler or IAEM do not endorse or

    support any agency, organization, or company that posts or distributes this document.

Report this document

For any questions or suggestions please email
cust-service@docsford.com