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The Bend Poetry Editors Kim Koga CJ Waterman Prose Editors

By Jerome Willis,2014-11-11 21:08
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The Bend Poetry Editors Kim Koga CJ Waterman Prose Editors

    The

    Bend

    Poetry Editors: Prose Editors: Kim Koga EddieJoe I. Cherbony CJ Waterman Levi Bronson Sanchez

    2010

    Number Seven

    University of Notre Dame

The Bend

    Number Seven

Poetry Editors

    Kim Koga

    CJ Waterman

Prose Editors

    EddieJoe I. Cherbony

    Levi Bronson Sanchez

Bendies

    Donald Cowan

    Elijah Park

Front & Back Cover Photo

    Tasha Matsumoto

Front Cover Design

    Jen Penkethman

Content Formatting & Design

    EddieJoe I. Cherbony

    Levi Bronson Sanchez

Copyright ? 2010 The Bend

    Rights revert to author upon publication

This is the 2010 installment of the showcase for the work of

    students, alumni, and friends of the Creative Writing Program

    at the University of Notre Dame -- the journal known, in

    previous incarnations as Dánta, La Rue Barbarian, and The

    . Rhubarbarian

    The Bend does not read unsolicited manuscripts. Printed in the United States

TABLE OF CONTENTS

    Forward......................................................................................................................... 4 Cyndi Vander Ven ..................................................................................................... 6 Desmond Kon ............................................................................................................. 7 Emily DiFilippo.......................................................................................................... 9 Jessica M. English ..................................................................................................... 13 Stephanie Magdalena White .................................................................................. 14 Jeanne deVita ............................................................................................................ 16 Cyndy Searfoss .......................................................................................................... 22 Jessica Maich ............................................................................................................. 26 Jennifer Stockdale..................................................................................................... 27 Dónal Kevin Gordon ............................................................................................... 29 Melanie Page ............................................................................................................. 30 Sami Schalk ................................................................................................................ 36 Francisco Aragón ...................................................................................................... 37 Shannon Doyne ........................................................................................................ 42 Danna Ephland ......................................................................................................... 47 Corey Madsen ........................................................................................................... 48 R. Jess Lavolette ....................................................................................................... 53 William McGee Jr.................................................................................................... 55 Jared Randall ............................................................................................................. 62 Jen Penkethman ........................................................................................................ 65 Renée E. D’Aoust ..................................................................................................... 72 Grant Osborn ............................................................................................................ 74 Lisa De Niscia ........................................................................................................... 76 Sheheryar Sheikh ...................................................................................................... 87 Sarah Bowman ........................................................................................................... 88 A. Faith De Betta ...................................................................................................... 92 Elizabeth Smith-Meyer ........................................................................................... 97 Alicia Guarracino...................................................................................................... 98 Iris Law .................................................................................................................... 101 Donald Cowan ....................................................................................................... 103

Bend

over.

the editors

Cyndi Vander Ven

DÉPRESSION: UNE PENSÉE

de scent

    deep hollowed throat

    great grey wings and milky breasts you shroud-wrap your dark children, suckle them as you lay light to rest in old tombs

Desmond Kon

DESIGNER DRINKS AT SUB ZERO

    to let go, our cupola love of first flares, sudden flax massive music, beat mixer on three decks

any correspondence reads like a lover‘s promise

    it‘s possible to say the aubades never mattered

it‘s possible to be as detached, labels, cold water

    because epithets are cheap, effete;

    like a good evening out, feigned angst, faux fur flashcard sommelier when he says it is he who loves

more than everyone else; it is he who doesn‘t spin

    language games; his visions never left tepid

    daymark pickle, snivels, yellowing in a jar; but is this sea chant and table salt?

    quizzical himself; the egg has lost its ostrich shell in vinegar, moon illusion;

    show them body armour, what happens anyway the servile possibility of it, bouguereau in a bounce

    The Bend 7

3 HAIKUS AND 3 IAMBS:

    A NON-PLANAR TRIANGLE

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    kea1chmerntlaokoi3ngorffien perawlshne4he5fuondonfeograt velauehewnte4awyaadnsodlevetrhy inhgahedandbhtouigt6maewtht 8

Emily DiFilippo

THE PIONEER

    here is only one photograph of you, and it was taken after your life was

    finished. Your eyebrows are heavy and dark, your face surrounded by T

    the white of a wimple. The black veil covering your head is a vow of death, even in life. But it is joyful death, it is freedom from all things of the world. Your body was of no consequence; it was only what carried you.

    As children, we were shown this picture. It hangs in the school, low enough for a first grader to see. But we were not afraid. We were sent to kneel before the sarcophagus with ―Mother Duchesne‖ engraved along its shining flank. Your bones did not frighten us, either.

    The shrine where they laid you is simple, the walls are tall and white. They built it as they thought you wanted. They cut the altar from cold Missouri granite. Every morning, a Sister practices the organ. The metronome ticks and the sun shines on her white hair. They brought you the crucifix, the one from the Visitation Convent in Grenoble, in France. From when you, too, were a child. They tell me it is lighter than one might expect. Below the corpus is inscribed, in old French: ―O bon Jesvs crvcifié povr novs sauez

    novs.‖

    They say you had a talent for sewing. Here is a chair you were mending with cowhide. Here are pieces of dolls‘ furniture that you made for the children in the infirmary. Two hundred years later, their upholstery is still scarlet and rich.

    Outside, there are still children, girls in plaid jumpers, boys in knee pants. Red sweaters. No doubt they learn their prayers in French as I did, in the words that you left us. The children will always be here.

* * *

    On the day of our First Communion, we made a circle in your parlor, reciting our prayers to the Blessed Mother, to the Sacred Heart. The Sisters gave us each a rosary, white beads, with a case marked ―My First Communion‖ in gold. On the walls around us hung tall portraits of the girls

    who preceded us in the last century. We wore matching white dresses: long, ruffled, unflattering. We did not wear veilswe were discouraged from the

    sin of vanity. I wore thick glasses with tortoiseshell rims. It is said that you were expected to grow up beautiful, until smallpox scarred your face.

    The Bend 9

    Your childhood was in the province of Dauphiny, where you loved animals and the outdoors. Even before the Revolution, you listened to the tales of missionary priests who had walked the valley of the Mississippi. When you heard names in the native languages, you wanted to be with the people they described.

    It was the turn of the nineteenth century when the Sacred Heart found you. Perhaps he was in a garden, under oak trees, his robes greened with moss, heart pulsing against a ring of thorns, releasing flames. Maybe he pointed to this spectacle, or maybe his arms were outstretched. It was after the Revolution when he called to St. Madeleine Sophie Barat, when she formed the order of the Religieuses du Sacré Coeur. Madeleine Sophie is the patron saint of school girls, they told us. They said we should pray to her when we struggled, that through her, God would enlighten our minds. Her statue stands in the VaticanI saw it when I was fifteen. She was up high,

    her marble veil lifted by celestial wind. I was proud to see a saint I knew there, in the drafty shadows of St. Peter‘s Basilica, so far from the classrooms where we learned her name.

    To you, she was Mother Superior, and she would not send you to the New World. You had a vow of obedience. But DuBourg, Bishop of the Louisianas, knocked at the Motherhouse door seeking teachers and missionaries for his diocese. Then it was decided that you would cross the ocean. You were named Superior of the American Mission. You were forty-nine years old.

    The year was 1818, the voyage to St. Louis in the Illinois country was six months. There was a comet in the sky.

    When you landed at the Port of New Orleans, you found the moss strange, hanging as it does from the cyprus trees. The people told you it was good for making mattresses.

* * *

    The Sisters who taught us wore the Sacred Heart blooming at the center of their profession crosses. The girls‘ school was a chateau with white stones

    and towers.

    We wore skirts for field hockey and lacrosse. On your Feast Day, we ate sugar cookies shaped like oak leaves, with orange and yellow icing. This is because your name, Duchesne, means ―of oak.‖ And we did not say they were cookies; we called them goûter, in the French.

10

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