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Terms Used in Unit 8 Part 2

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Group Information Pack

    Yesterday‟s World, superbly situated in the delightful historic market town of Battle, is a

    great place to visit for Coach parties, Clubs

    and Societies looking for a unique and

    memorable day out.

    Email:- shop@yesterdaysworld.co.uk

    Telephone (0)1424 777226

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    Group Pack Contents Cover Page……………………………………………………………………………….. Page 1

    Contents…………………………………………………………………………………. Page 2

    Introduction……………………………………………………………………........... Page 3

    Yesterdays World Layout………………………………………………….………… Page 4

    Yesterdays World Information………………........................................... Page 5

    Group Booking Prices……………………………………………………………….. Page 6

    Risk Assessment……………………………………………………………………….. Page 7

    The Known History of Yesterday‟s World and Battle……………………. Page 8

    Key Dates in English History……………………………………………………… Page 9

    Background Information On Displays………....................................... Page 10 Background Information On Displays………....................................... Page 11 Background Information On Displays………....................................... Page 12 Background Information On Displays………....................................... Page 13 Background Information On Displays………....................................... Page 14 Background Information On Displays………....................................... Page 15 Background Information On Displays………....................................... Page 16 Museum Quiz…………………………………………………………………………… Page 17

    Museum Quiz…………………………………………………………………………… Page 18

    Museum Quiz…………………………………………………………………………… Page 19

    Museum Quiz Answers……………………………………………………………… Page 20

    FAQs………………………………………………………………………………………. Page 21

    FAQs………………………………………………………………………………………. Page 22

    Contact Us………………………………………………………………………………. Page 23

    Group Booking Form……………………………………………………………… Page 24

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    Introduction

    Your visit to Yesterday‟s World is a journey through time and how we used to live, from the reign of Queen Victoria to the 1970s.

CONTENTS OF THIS PACK

    Inside this pack you will find all the information you need to know about bringing your group to visit us, with details of our opening times, prices, parking and tips to help you make the most of your visit.

    To help you plan your visit we have included various background information on the displays at Yesterday‟s World and a risk assessment for the attraction. Many other resources and activities are available to download for free from our website.

FREE SITE VISITS

    We offer free site visits for teachers by prior arrangement. There have been a lot of new developments at Yesterday‟s World recently so even if you have visited before, you may benefit from a ‟refresher‟ preliminary visit to see the latest facilities we have to offer. To arrange a site visit, please contact us on 01424 777226.

UPON ARRIVAL WITH YOUR SCHOOL

    You will be greeted by a member of staff who will give you a briefing before you start your tour round the museum. We do not provide guided tours but our staff are always on hand to answer any questions you may have. We will look after your bags while you go round the museum. If you require any further assistance, we will be happy to help.

TIPS TO MAKE THE MOST OF YOUR VISIT

     Split into smaller groups of 8-10 to go round (see page 5)

     Allow time for the group to make close observations of all the settings; especially the ones that apply to any specific studies.

     Please make full use of the push button commentaries

     Audience with Queen Victoria display - select a topic on the touch-screen panel. Topics include Queen Victoria‟s Family Tree, Inventions, The Lives of Victorian Children and Battle in Victorian Times. Screenings up to 10mins long.

     War Room Display an evacuee video will play as you walk into the room. Screenings up to 15mins long.

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    Yesterdays World Layout

    Yesterday‟s World has three distinct areas - the main building, the exhibition centre building and an outside area.

    LAYOUT INSIDE

    The main building is on three floors of a 600 year old Wealden Hall House. It has 23 rooms, which show different shops and a room dedicated to World War II, Evacuation, Life at Home and Women's Roles. There are also 4 rooms at the top of the house, which show the children‟s nursery and school rooms.

    Ground floor: 1930s Grocers; Post Office; Jewellers, Music Shop; „Allworks‟ General Store; Street Scene

    1st floor: Barbers; Mrs Bumble‟s Sweet Shop; Wireless Shop; Wartime Display; Chemist; Doll and Toy Shop; Pawnbrokers; Loo with a View; Boot Repairer; Lace maker; Drapers; Taxidermies; Ironmongers; Victorian Kitchen and Laundry. Attic floor: Nanny‟s Room; Granny‟s Attic; Children‟s Dayroom; Children‟s Games; Fairground; Toys; Children‟s Playroom and Bedroom.

    The Exhibition Centre has a large room devoted to Queen Victoria and the

    British Monarchy ( see the Queen, Prince Phillip and Prince Charles) on the first floor with a 3D interactive „Audience with Queen Victoria‟ display, and a street scene and further 9 exhibition rooms on the ground floor, including: Mail coach and horses; Tea and Coffee Purveyors; Edwardian Drapers; Domestic Bazaar; Judges Camera Shop; Electrical Shop; Wartime Kitchen; General Store; 1960-70s Clothes and Record Boutique.

    LAYOUT OUTSIDE

    On the lawn there is a climbing frame with a soft landing suitable for nursery and Key Stage 1, some individual rocking toys and a draughts set. At the bottom of the garden is an area with a variety of buildings for imaginative play - Elizabethan house, forge, castle, church, school, village store and a cannon. There is enough to occupy a whole class and would suit ages 4-10 years.

IDEAS FOR ORGANISATION

    The Exhibition Centre creates an ideal opportunity to split your group and start them in three different locations.

    Group 1: Entrance to the original house exhibition and the World War II Room Group 2: Entrance straight to the Royalty Room, 1st floor of Exhibition Centre Group 3: Entrance to the Street Scene, ground floor of Exhibition Centre The groups could then move from 1>2>3; 2>3>1; 3>1>2

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    Yesterdays World Site Information

SHOPPING

    There is a big souvenir shop as you leave Yesterday‟s World, this is well stocked

    with items for every age and pocket. There is an old fashioned sweet shop selling loose sweets by weight plus individual sweets e.g. lollipops, flyers saucers, fruit salads and black jacks.

CATERING

    The tea room, which is situated at the rear of the building by the garden, sells teas, coffees, cold drinks, cake, sandwiches etc. You are welcome to bring your own packed lunches and to use this area for your lunch. The tea room can accommodate up to 30 people so it may be necessary to stagger your lunch period for larger groups. There is also a picnic area in the garden, consisting of 6 tables with benches and chairs and two long benches and further seating on the decking outside the tea room.

TOILETS

    Ladies, gentlemen‟s and disabled toilets are on the ground floor to the left as you

    enter the exhibition centre.

FIRST AID

    There is no first aid room but qualified first aiders are on site at all times.

PARKING

    There is no parking on site. The nearest coach park is located behind Market Square at the north end of the High Street, first exit off the roundabout. Most schools get the coach driver to drop them off outside Yesterday‟s World first.

    Alternatively it is only a short walk from the coach park with public toilets on the way in Market Square.

HOW TO BOOK

    All visits should be pre-booked in advance. Please call 01424 777226 and we will send you a confirmation to bring with you on the day. Our office hours are Monday to Friday 9.30-5.00. Alternatively you can make a booking request online at http://www.yesterdaysworld.co.uk/battlegroupvisitenquiry.asp 5

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    Group Prices 11+ paying people (prices per person)

Yesterdays World Yesterdays World and Battle Abbey

    Adult ?5.95 Adult ?11.00

    Senior Citizen ?4.95 Senior Citizen ?9.80

    Child (4-15) ?4.20 Child (4-15) ?7.00

    Under 4's free

    Student ?4.20 Student ?9.80

    Special Needs ?4.20

    Carer ?2.00

    Driver & Organiser FREE Driver & Organiser FREE

HOW TO BOOK?

    All visits should be pre-booked in advance by calling 01424 777226 or fill in the booking form on page 38. We will then send confirmation of your booking to bring with you on the day.

    FLEXIBLE ALL DAY ENTRY TICKETS For Clubs and Societies we offer

    flexible entry tickets at our special group rate so that you can tailor your visit to suit the different needs of your party. Explore the beautiful historic market town

    of Battle and visit our exhibition and English country garden at your leisure.

    PAYMENT METHODS

    A deposit for your visit will be requested and the balance will be payable upon arrival. We accept Mastercard, Visa, Solo, Switch and Maestro or a cheque made payable to „Yesterday‟s World Limited‟. When paying the balance on the day we recommend that

    the driver or tour leader comes to the counter first, to pay for the group as a whole and then distributes the entry tickets to the their party to avoid congestion in the gift shop. If part of a combined visit to Battle Abbey, the group leader will also be given a Service Voucher to exchange for tickets at Battle Abbey.

DISABLED ACCESS

    Yesterday‟s World, is presented in two parts; a 600 year old medieval hall-house set

    over 3 floors, and a new 2 storey state-of-the-art exhibition centre that is purpose built to allow access for all. The tea room is also fully wheelchair friendly with lift access to the garden. Due to its listed status, access to the upper floors of the medieval house is via stairs. There is a Disabled toilet on site.

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    Risk Assessment

    MAIN BUILDING

    The main building is on three floors and due to its age and listed status there are:

     Steep spiral-type stairs, which are black but do have a white strip edge.

     No handrails on parts of some staircases.

     Very low ceilings in some places, however these are well signposted

     Cobbles on the ground floor, which make the surface uneven

     Single steps connecting areas on the same floor as all the areas of one floor

     are not on the same level - there are warning notices.

     Some narrow passages.

    NEW BUILDING AND OUTSIDE AREA

     There is a ramp from the main building to the new building.

     There are modern stairs with a handrail to and from the Royalty Room.

     There are stairs with a handrail to the tearoom and steps from there to the

     garden.

     There are 4 steps with a handrail to the grass, which can also be accessed by a

     sloping path.

     The outside play area has bark chips on the landing area.

     There are no obstacles in the remainder of the outside area. WHEELCHAIR ACCESS

     There is no wheelchair access to the 2nd and 3rd floors in the main building.

     The ground floor is cobbled and very uneven.

     There is a lift from street level to the Royalty Room.

     There is a lift from the tearoom to the garden level.

     There is a sloping path through to the garden.

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    The Known History of Yesterday’s World and Battle

    The attractive town of Battle gets it name from the Battle of Hastings, which was fought between Harold the Saxon king and William the Conqueror in 1066. The battle was so significant it changed the course of English history.

    The town grew up around the Abbey of St Martin which was built by William the Conqueror after the battle. It is said that William vowed that should he win the battle he would build such an abbey. The abbey was built between 1070 and 1094, and the high altar is believed to have been placed on the spot where Harold fell. Today the Abbey ruins and the battlefield are cared for by English Heritage and are well worth a visit. The imposing Abbey gatehouse built circa 1338 can be seen as you look down the length of the High Street.

    Battle has some notable Georgian buildings along its High Street. The cottages and houses near the Abbey date from around 1700. The parish church of St Mary was built in Norman times and for the most part is 12th century in construction. It offers the visitor rare 14th century wall paintings and a Norman font amongst other things. At the Northern end of the High Street can be found the Almonry which was built in 1090 and now houses the Town Council and the Battle Museum of Local History.

Known History of the Building

    Yesterday‟s World occupies numbers 89 and 90 High Street, Battle. The original building is over 600 years old. It was built in 1410 for the accountant of Battle Abbey. Over time it was converted into two separate dwellings (numbers 89 and 90), which have been home to a long list of occupants over the years, including a boarding school and dentist‟s surgery, as well as private dwellings. In 1986, 90 High Street was bought by Mr and Mrs Buckley and converted into a museum and gift shop. In 1992 they acquired number 89 and knocked it through to expand the museum that we see today.

Structure of the Building (89-90 High Street, Battle, East Sussex)

    The main structure of the building dates back to 1406. The house that was constructed was a „Wealden‟ hall house with an open hall and a two storied bay at either end, which housed the parlour and the services for the chambers above.

    The date of the stone walled cellar is not certain although such cellars would usually be located beneath the parlour. Each of the two rear ranges housed a single room on each storey. Both doorways giving access between the front and rear first floor chambers survive though are now blocked. The chambers throughout were originally open to the roof.

    First floor doorways survive in the north wall of the main range between the front and rear chambers, that within the eastern bay being located so as to suit the position of the former stairs. Both openings are now blocked but retain their plain elliptically-arched heads. A heavy mortice in the side of one of the exposed joists marks the former position of the stairs within the eastern bay. No details are known regarding the position of the stairs within the western bay.

    The hall was floored over and a chimney inserted in the late 18th century. It is thought at this time the house was converted into two dwellings though it remained in single ownership. New dog-leg staircases were now inserted into the end bays. Both stairs rise to the attic level and the eastern one still retains its shaped slat banisters at first floor level. Partitions were inserted into the eastern chamber in order to form a landing area, as well as dividing the original chamber.

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    Key Dates in English History

    23rd March 1861 1st trams operate in London

    10 January 1863 The London Underground Opens

    26th May 1868 Last Public Hanging

    10 March 1876 Alexander Graham Bell makes the 1st telephone call 1st February 1884 The first oxford dictionary published 13th October 1884 World adopts Greenwich Meantime 11th October 1886 First statue to honour a woman is erected 22nd January 1901 Queen Victoria Dies

    2nd October 1901 Royal Navy launches 1st submarine 29th November 1907 Florence Nightingale is presented with the Order of Merit

    17th January 1912 Captain Scott reached the South Pole 15th April 1912 Titanic sinks

    28th July 1914 Start of World War I

    4th August 1914 Britain declares War on Germany 24th December 1914 First Bomb dropped on English soil 6th February 1918 Women get the Vote

    1st April 1918 RAF Created

    11 November 1918 End of World War I

    20th December 1928 Harry Ramsden opens first Fish and Chip shop 5th March 1936 Maiden flight of the Spitfire

    3rd September 1939 Britain declares War on Germany World War II begins 27th May 1940 Evacuation of Dunkirk Begins

    3rd June 1940 Evacuation of Dunkirk Ends

    10th July 1940 The Battle of Britain Begins

    15th September 1940 The Battle of Britain Ends

    16th May 1943 Dambusters Raid

    24th March 1944 The Real Great Escape

    6th June 1944 D-Day Landings

    7th May 1945 Nazi Germany Surrenders VE Day

    2nd June 1953 Queen Elizabeth II Coronation

    4th October 1962 The Beatles release 1st single 23rd November 1963 First Episode of Dr Who

    24th January 1965 Winston Churchill dies

    30th July 1966 England win the World Cup

    18th December 1969 Death Penalty abolished

    15th February 1971 the UK decimalized, replacing the shilling and penny

    7th June 1977 Silver Jubilee celebrations

    19th October 1987 Black Monday Market Crash

    6th May 1994 The Channel Tunnel opens

    22ns February 1997 Dolly the Sheep Cloned

    31st august 1997 Diana, Princess of Wales, dies in a car crash 12th August 1999 Total eclipse of the sun

    30th March 2002 Queen Mother Dies

    18th February 2005 Fox Hunting banned in the UK

    18th December 2007 Queen becomes Oldest British Monarch

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    Background Information about displays The Grocers (1930’s) – PUSH BUTTON COMMENTARY

    S. Searle and Sons is a general store and appears as it would have done in the 1930‟s. The shelves are heavily laden with everything from floor polish to fresh meat. In the 1930‟s an

    increasing number of items were being sold pre-packaged, examples on display include flour, tea and cocoa. You could still buy some items loose, such as the biscuits displayed in front of the counter. The grocer would also sell butter in the weight you required; see the butter slab and pats on the back shelf. Before the days of supermarkets, villages boasted a wide variety of shops, the likes of which you will discover today. All the household‟s needs would be served

    and people would only travel to the towns for luxury items, to visit friends or to enjoy a day out. The general store often formed the hub of village communities where people could catch up on all the local gossip as well as do the family shopping. The grocer, in this case Mr Searle, would know all his customers by name and would be familiar with the families like and dislikes. He would probably know the price of everything in his shop without looking, and if you didn‟t have the correct change, the nearest few pennies would do. Items ordered in the

    morning would be delivered by the errand boy on his trade bicycle by lunch time! The wire above the grocer‟s head is called a rapid wire and the grocer would attach your bill and payment and zip it along to the cashier who would send back the correct change.

The Post Office

    The village post office was often incorporated into the general store to supplement the shopkeeper‟s income. In the days before phone boxes (and a long time before mobile phones!), people made telephone calls from here to the local exchange, where the operator put their calls through for them.

Allwork’s Store (Turn of the Century) – PUSH BUTTON COMMENTARY

    The oldest general store at Yesterday's World dates from the late 19th century before pre-packaging was introduced, when all goods (including coffee, tea, treacle and tobacco) were weighed out by hand.

The Jeweller’s

    Amongst the jewellery on display in the jeweller‟s window are Victorian mourning brooches, which were fashionable during the time of Prince Albert‟s death – jet being the most popular

    material. Other items to spot include the Georgian patch box with its stick-on beauty spot, and a leaf-patterned box containing a 2s. 6d. pocket watch.

Mrs Bumbles Chocolate and Tobacco Shop (1920’s) – PUSH BUTTON COMMENTARY

    The confectionery shop, with its delicious aroma, is filled with traditional sweets and packaging as it would have been sold in the 1920‟s. Gobstoppers, liquorice root, giant humbugs, barley twists and other colourful candies could be bought for half a penny in a paper twist. We also have a small brass lacer tin which Princess Mary, the daughter of Queen Mary, sent to the soldiers fighting in WWII.

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