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Science Grade 4 - Canada's Wonderland

By Brandon Owens,2014-05-29 12:46
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Science Grade 4 - Canada's Wonderland

GRADE 4 SCIENCE

TABLE OF CONTENTS

CANADA’S WONDERLAND Science Grade 4 1

GRADE 4 SCIENCE

IN-SCHOOL PREPARATION

CANADA’S WONDERLAND Science Grade 4 2

    Welcome Grade 4 Teachers to

    Canada’s Wonderland’s Science Program!

    We have provided you with activities that will take you from your classroom to an action filled day at the Park. The BEFORE THE PARK activities are set up for your students

    to practice some new skills and review some old ones before they go to the Park. The AT THE PARK activities are a continuation and extension of the classroom activities. The tasks set up for your students at the Park are designed to let them enjoy all that Canada’s Wonderland has to offer, while gathering some data to be used back at the school. The students will use this information to complete a SUMMATIVE

    ASSESSMENT that allows them to extend the experiences that they began in the classroom before the trip. Every activity is completely linked to the new revised Science Curriculum.

    Every activity is designed as a real-world experience. As in the real world, there are many possible solutions to a variety of questions. We encourage you to challenge your students to think deeply and reflect on the tasks that are set out before them. We hope that this experience will be a celebration and extension of your teaching and learning this year. In addition, some of the key skills and processes, such as Brainstorming and

    Predicting are highlighted to remind students the skills they can use to help complete the task. The Design Options are highly recommended as this is where science becomes

    “alive”. Please invest some time and resources and allow your students the opportunity to design, test and experiment with these challenges.

Thank you for your on-going support for young people and our programs at Canada’s

    Wonderland.

CANADA’S WONDERLAND Science Grade 4 3

    CW Physics, Science & Math Day Activities

    A correlation with the Ontario Science Curriculum, Grade 4

    Activity Expectations

    - analyse the effects of human activities on habitats and communities It’s Alive

    - investigate the interdependence of plants and animals within specific

    habitats and communities

    - demonstrate an understanding of habitats and communities and the relationships among the plants and animals that live in them

    - analyse the positive and negative impacts of human interactions with

    natural habitats and communities (e.g. human dependence on natural

    materials), taking different perspectives into account (e.g. the

    perspectives of a housing developer, a family in need of housing, an ecologist), and evaluate ways of minimizing the negative impacts

    - identify reasons for the depletion or extinction of a plant or animal species (e.g. hunting, disease, invasive species, changes in or destruction of its habitat), evaluate the impacts on the rest of the

    natural community, and propose possible actions for preventing such depletions or extinctions from happening

    - use scientific inquiry/research skills to investigate ways in which plants and animals in a community depend on features of their habitat to meet important needs

    - use appropriate science and technology vocabulary, including habitat, population, community, adaptation, and food chain, in oral

    and written communication

    - use a variety of forms (e.g. oral, written, graphic, multimedia) to

    communicate with different audiences and for a variety of purposes

    (e.g. use presentation software to show the steps one might follow to set up and maintain a terrarium)

    - demonstrate an understanding of habitats as areas that provide plants and animals with the necessities of life (e.g. food, water, air, space,

    and light)

    - identify factors (e.g. availability of water or food, amount of light, type of weather) that affect the ability of plants and animals to survive in a specific habitat

    - demonstrate an understanding of a community as a group of

    interacting species sharing a common habitat (e.g. the life in a

    meadow or in a patch of forest)

    CANADA’S WONDERLAND Science Grade 4 4

- describe structural adaptations that allow plants and animals to It’s Alive (cont’d)

    survive in specific habitats (e.g. the thick stem of a cactus stores

    water for the plant; a duck’s webbed feet allow it to move quickly and efficiently in water)

    - describe ways in which humans are dependent on natural habitats and communities (e.g. for water, medicine, flood control in

    wetlands, leisure activities)

- assess the social and environmental impacts of human uses of Rocks & Roll

    rocks and minerals

    - investigate, test, and compare the physical properties of rocks and minerals

    - demonstrate an understanding of the physical properties of rocks

    and minerals

    - assess the social and environmental costs and benefits of using objects in the built environment that are made from rocks and minerals from it are persistent in the environment

    - analyse the impact on society and the environment of extracting

    and refining rocks and minerals for human use, taking different perspectives into account

    - use a variety of tests to identify the physical properties of minerals (e.g. hardness [scratch test], colour [streak test], magnetism)

    - use a variety of criteria (e.g. colour, texture, lustre) to classify

    common rocks and minerals according to their characteristics

    - use scientific inquiry/research skills to investigate how rocks and minerals are used and disposed of in everyday life

    - use appropriate science and technology vocabulary, including hardness, colour, lustre, and texture, in oral and written

    communication

    - use a variety of forms (e.g. oral, written, graphic, multimedia) to

    communicate with different audiences and for a variety of purposes

    (e.g. use a graphic organizer to show how rocks and minerals are used in daily life)

    - describe the properties (e.g. colour, lustre, streak, transparency,

    hardness) that are used to identify minerals

    - describe how igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic rocks are

    formed (e.g. igneous rocks form when hot, liquid rock from deep below the earth’s surface rises towards the surface, cools, and solidifies; sedimentary rocks form when small pieces of the earth that have been worn away by wind and water accumulate at the

    bottom of rivers, lakes, and oceans and are eventually compressed into rock; metamorphic rocks form when igneous or sedimentary

    CANADA’S WONDERLAND Science Grade 4 5

rocks are changed by heat and pressure)

- describe the characteristics of the three classes of rocks (e.g. Rocks & Roll

    (cont’d) sedimentary rocks often have flat or curved layers, are composed of pieces that are roughly the same size with pores between the pieces, and often contain fossils; igneous rocks have no layers, are usually made up of two or more minerals whose crystals are different sizes, and normally do not contain fossils; metamorphic rocks may have alternating bands of light and dark minerals, may be composed of only one mineral, such as marble or quartzite, and rarely contain

    fossils), and explain how their characteristics are related to their origin

    - evaluate the impact of pulleys and gears on society and the Up & Down &

    environment Around We Go

    - investigate ways in which pulleys and gears modify the speed and direction of, and the force exerted on, moving objects

    - demonstrate an understanding of the basic principles and functions of pulley systems and gear systems

    - assess the impact of pulley systems and gear systems on daily life

    - assess the environmental impact of using machines with pulleys

    and gears, taking different perspectives into account (e.g. the

    perspective of a car driver or cyclist, someone who is physically challenged, the owner of a multi-floor building), and suggest ways

    to minimize negative impacts and maximize positive impacts

    - use scientific inquiry/experimentation skills to investigate changes in force, distance, speed, and direction in pulley and gear systems

    - use technological problem-solving skills to design, build, and test a pulley or gear system that performs a specific task

    - use appropriate science and technology vocabulary, including pulley, gear, force, and speed, in oral and written communication

    - use a variety of forms (e.g. oral, written, graphic, multimedia) to

    communicate with different audiences and for a variety of purposes

    - describe the purposes of pulley systems and gear systems (e.g. to

    facilitate changes in direction, speed, or force)

    - describe how rotary motion in one system or its components (e.g.

    a system of pulleys of different sizes) is transferred to another

    system or component (e.g. a system of various gears) in the same

    structure

    - distinguish between pulley systems and gear systems that increase force and those that increase speed

    - identify pulley systems (e.g. clotheslines, flagpoles, cranes,

    elevators, farm machinery) and gear systems (e.g. bicycles, hand

    drills, can openers) that are used in daily life, and explain the purpose and basic operation of each

    CANADA’S WONDERLAND Science Grade 4 6

- assess the impact on society and the environment of technological Can You Feel the

    innovations related to light and sound Energy?

    - investigate the characteristics and properties of light and sound

    - demonstrate an understanding of light and sound as forms of energy that have specific characteristics and properties

    - assess the impacts on personal safety of devices that apply the properties of light and/or sound (e.g. UV-coated lenses in

    sunglasses, safety eyes on garage door openers, reflective material on clothing, ear plugs, backup signals on trucks and cars, MP3

    players, cell phones), and propose ways of using these devices to make our daily activities safer

    - assess the impacts on society and the environment of light and/or sound energy produced by different technologies, taking different

    perspectives into account (e.g. the perspectives of someone who has to walk on the street late at night, a cottage owner, a person who is hearing impaired, manufacturers of and merchants who sell MP3 players)

    - investigate the basic properties of light (e.g. conduct experiments

    to show that light travels in a straight path, that light reflects off of shiny surfaces, that light refracts [bends] when passing from one medium to another, that white light is made up of many colours, that light diffracts [bends and spreads out] when passing through an opening)

    - investigate the basic properties of sound (e.g. conduct experiments

    to show that sound travels, that sound can be absorbed or reflected, that sound can be modified [pitch, volume], that there is a

    relationship between vibrations and sound)

    - use appropriate science and technology vocabulary, including natural, artificial, beam of light, pitch, loudness, and vibration, in

    oral and written communication

    - use a variety of forms (e.g. oral, written, graphic, multimedia) to

    communicate with different audiences and for a variety of purposes

    - identify a variety of natural light sources (e.g. the sun, a firefly)

    and artificial light sources (e.g. a candle, fireworks, a light bulb)

    - describe properties of light, including the following: light travels in a straight path; light can be absorbed, reflected, and refracted

    - describe properties of sound, including the following: sound travels; sound can be absorbed or reflected and can be modified (e.g. pitch, loudness)

    - explain how vibrations cause sound

    - distinguish between sources of light that give off both light and heat (e.g. the sun, a candle, an incandescent light bulb) and those

    that give off light but little or no heat (e.g. an LED, a firefly, a

    CANADA’S WONDERLAND Science Grade 4 7

compact fluorescent bulb, a glow stick)

- assess the social and environmental impacts of human uses of A Medieval

    rocks and minerals Renovation

    - investigate, test, and compare the physical properties of rocks and Keep On Digging

    minerals

    - demonstrate an understanding of the physical properties of rocks and minerals

    - assess the social and environmental costs and benefits of using objects in the built environment that are made from rocks and minerals from it are persistent in the environment

    - analyse the impact on society and the environment of extracting and refining rocks and minerals for human use, taking different perspectives into account

    - use a variety of tests to identify the physical properties of minerals (e.g. hardness [scratch test], colour [streak test], magnetism)

    - use a variety of criteria (e.g. colour, texture, lustre) to classify

    common rocks and minerals according to their characteristics

    - use scientific inquiry/research skills to investigate how rocks and minerals are used and disposed of in everyday life

    - use appropriate science and technology vocabulary, including hardness, colour, lustre, and texture, in oral and written

    communication

    - use a variety of forms (e.g. oral, written, graphic, multimedia) to

    communicate with different audiences and for a variety of purposes (e.g. use a graphic organizer to show how rocks and minerals are used in daily life)

    - describe the properties (e.g. colour, lustre, streak, transparency, hardness) that are used to identify minerals

    - describe how igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic rocks are formed

    - describe the characteristics of the three classes of rocks and explain how their characteristics are related to their origin

- analyse the effects of human activities on habitats and A Medieval

    communities Renovation If

    - investigate the interdependence of plants and animals within You Build It,

    specific habitats and communities They Will Come

    - demonstrate an understanding of habitats and communities and the relationships among the plants and animals that live in them

    - analyse the positive and negative impacts of human interactions with natural habitats and communities (e.g. human dependence on

    natural materials), taking different perspectives into account (e.g.

    the perspectives of a housing developer, a family in need of housing, an ecologist), and evaluate ways of minimizing the

    CANADA’S WONDERLAND Science Grade 4 8

negative impacts

- use appropriate science and technology vocabulary, including A Medieval

    habitat, population, community, adaptation, and food chain, in oral Renovation If

    and written communication You Build It,

    - use a variety of forms (e.g. oral, written, graphic, multimedia) to They Will Come

    communicate with different audiences and for a variety of purposes (e.g. use presentation software to show the steps one might follow to set up and maintain a terrarium)

    - demonstrate an understanding of habitats as areas that provide plants and animals with the necessities of life (e.g. food, water, air,

    space, and light)

    - identify factors (e.g. availability of water or food, amount of light, type of weather) that affect the ability of plants and animals to survive in a specific habitat

    - describe structural adaptations that allow plants and animals to survive in specific habitats

    - describe ways in which humans are dependent on natural habitats and communities

    - investigate ways in which pulleys and gears modify the speed and direction of, and the force exerted on, moving objects

    - demonstrate an understanding of the basic principles and functions

    of pulley systems and gear systems

    - use scientific inquiry/experimentation skills to investigate changes in force, distance, speed, and direction in pulley and gear systems

    - use technological problem-solving skills to design, build, and test

    a pulley or gear system that performs a specific task

    - use appropriate science and technology vocabulary, including pulley, gear, force, and speed, in oral and written communication

    - use a variety of forms (e.g. oral, written, graphic, multimedia) to

    communicate with different audiences and for a variety of purposes

    - describe the purposes of pulley systems and gear systems (e.g. to

    facilitate changes in direction, speed, or force)

    - distinguish between pulley systems and gear systems that increase

    force and those that increase speed

    - assess the impact on society and the environment of technological A Medieval

    innovations related to light and sound Renovation

    - investigate the characteristics and properties of light and sound Light, Camera,

    - demonstrate an understanding of light and sound as forms of Action

    energy that have specific characteristics and properties

    - assess the impacts on personal safety of devices that apply the properties of light and/or sound (e.g. UV-coated lenses in

    sunglasses, safety eyes on garage door openers, reflective material on clothing, ear plugs, backup signals on trucks and cars, MP3 players, cell phones), and propose ways of using these devices to

    CANADA’S WONDERLAND Science Grade 4 9

make our daily activities safer

- assess the impacts on society and the environment of light and/or A Medieval

    sound energy produced by different technologies, taking different Renovation

    perspectives into account Light, Camera,

    - investigate the basic properties of light Action

    - investigate the basic properties of sound

    - use appropriate science and technology vocabulary, including natural, artificial, beam of light, pitch, loudness, and vibration, in

    oral and written communication

    - use a variety of forms (e.g. oral, written, graphic, multimedia) to

    communicate with different audiences and for a variety of purposes

    - identify a variety of natural light sources (e.g. the sun, a firefly)

    and artificial light sources (e.g. a candle, fireworks, a light bulb)

    - describe properties of light, including the following: light travels in a straight path; light can be absorbed, reflected, and refracted

    - describe properties of sound, including the following: sound travels; sound can be absorbed or reflected and can be modified (e.g. pitch, loudness)

    - explain how vibrations cause sound

    - distinguish between sources of light that give off both light and heat (e.g. the sun, a candle, an incandescent light bulb) and those

    that give off light but little or no heat

    CANADA’S WONDERLAND Science Grade 4 10

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