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Information Systems in Business

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Exploitation of Internet for marketing, e-commerce or e-business ? if you're technically-minded, you can propose a high level design for a web site to

Information Systems in Business BS3909

    Dates: 7 February 23 May 2006 Time: Tuesdays at 09:00 in FWB204

    Welcome to this module; your module leader will be Eric Bodger, and we also have some guest

    lecturers for you.

    Aims and Objectives

    The objectives of the module include consideration of the following:

    ? the role of information systems in businesses and management

    ? the wider issues involved in systems design, in particular interaction of the system with the

    environment and the achievement of competitive edge through the use of IT

    ? the relevance and necessity of managing the change introduced into the organisation by

    introduction of a new system

    Lectures and Seminars Lectures are intended to provide students with some theoretical background and framework of the

    topics. Further reading and research is required for greater understanding and clarification.

    Handouts will usually contain some additional pages to get you started.

    Seminars: sessions will be used to evaluate useful case studies, Seminars will also be used to help

    you make progress on your assignment, and to discuss any issues surrounding the subject.

    You are expected to attend these learning sessions.

    Resources:

    ? Lectures and seminars;

    ? Business and Informatics web-site home page http://www.winchester.ac.uk/bm (and you

    can go straight to the guide for this module at

    http://www.winchester.ac.uk/bm/courses/BS3909/;

    ? Module text and other items on the reading list (see below);

    ? Internet in general;

    ? Computer magazines (PC Week, Computer Weekly, Network News etc. now available on line);

    ? International business IT news (folder available in resource room);

    ? Bibliographies/references;

    ? Tips on writing assignments and Business Group’s notes on writing a report;

    ? I do not use the VLE for this module, though we can run discussion groups there if you wish.

    There are a number of recent books contributing to the development of information

    technology/information systems. The following are designed for use in undergraduate courses in

    business and for those intending to pursue a career in business administration and management.

    Find one or two to dip into for more detailed information on the topics covered in the module.

    BS3909 15 April 2010 1 Information Systems in Business

Recommended Reading

    Module Text:

    thLaudon, Kenneth C and Laudon, Jane P (2005): Management Information Systems 9 edition

    (Prentice Hall, 2005). The main new area in this edition is Chapter 9 The Wireless Revolution. ththThe 8 or 7 (2002) edition is also satisfactory if you can borrow one or buy it second-hand, so

    I’ve provided chapter references to those editions as well.

    This is an invaluable source for information offering a comprehensive guide to business and

    information systems. There are a number of case studies of the application of IT/IS.

    There is also a very similar book by the same authors: Essentials of Management Information thSystems 6 edition (Prentice Hall, 2005). The chapters match those of the module text apart from

    the insertion of a new Chapter 10. You can use this providing you don’t mind page references

    being out.

    The authors of the book are well rehearsed in IT/IS with both teaching and industrial experience in

    the field. A companion web site accompanies this book and students may wish to visit at

    www.prenhall.com/laudon

    You will get the best out of this module if you read the chapters indicated for each week it makes

    the session much more interactive, as it saves my having to explain things at length.

    Other Sources

    Alter, Steven (2002): Information Systems The Foundation of E-Business (Prentice Hall). This

    fourth edition is well-structured, with case-studies at the start and end of each chapter, and

    questions you can use to confirm understanding. The language can be complex in places.

    Benyon-Davies, Paul (2002) Information Systems (Palgrave). A UK perspective with a strong pedagogic focus. Each chapter begins with a graphic showing its coverage in a format close to a

    mind-map, and there are lists of self-test questions at the ends of chapters.

    Boddy, D; Boonstra, A; Kennedy, G (2002). Managing Information Systems, an organizational perspective (Financial Times Prentice Hall). A European book that balances the slight US focus of the course text.

    Brooks, Frederick P (1982). The Mythical Man-month (Addison-Wesley). The classic text on organizing software development, by the manager of the System/360 project.

    DeMarco, Tom & Lister, Timothy (1999). Peopleware (Dorset House, NY). Another classic. Vital for anyone hoping to manage technical people.

    Jessup, L & Valacich (2003) Information Systems Today (Prentice Hall). Good in the areas of systems for networking, but otherwise adding little to Laudon & Laudon.

    Lucey, Terry (1997). Management Information Systems (Letts). Eighth edition of a UK book dating back to 1976, which explains the focus on processes without tying them tightly to IT.

    A useful antidote to some of the technological hype you will encounter.

    O’Brien, James A: (2000) Introduction to Information Systems Essentials for the

    Internetworked Enterprise (McGraw-Hill). This book offers comprehensive information of similar

    areas to the one above with more of an international flavour. It specifies that it is for those

    studying or intending to follow business administration and management. It is a good source of

    case studies, but the promised web site for students to visit wasn’t working when I tested it.

    BS3909 15 April 2010 2 Information Systems in Business

Robson, Wendy (1997): Strategic Management & Information Systems (Financial Times Pitman

    Publishing). This book is designed for students studying business and is split into three parts.

    Strategic Management, Information Strategies, and Strategic Management of Information Systems.

    Some of these books will be available in the student bookshop and a few copies available in the

    library. As previously stated there are several books available for this subject area.

    Teaching and Learning Providing you’ve done the prior reading, there will be a lecture of 60 to 90 minutes, then a break, followed by a seminar.

    Students should supplement the lectures and seminars with further independent learning.

    The following points may help to complete this module successfully

    ? Read relevant chapter(s) from at least one book before the lecture

    ? Review any web sites mentioned in the lecture or handouts

    ? Plan your assignment and exam preparation well in advance don’t leave it to the last minute.

    Assessment

    The assignment takes the form of individual and group preparation for a presentation on a subject

    of your choice, and carries 50% of the module marks. The assignment specification and marking

    scheme is included on p. 5 of this guide.

    The examination (50% weight) is organized by Registry in the assessment period, and consists of

    two sections:

    ? Part I consists of five short questions to test a range of learning outcomes for the module. It

    carries about a third of the marks.

    ? Part II gives you a choice of two out of four questions (for about a third each), mainly based

    on issues raised in a case study you will be given in advance. The exam is closed-book, but

    you can bring in two sides of A4 (font size not smaller than 8!) of your own notes. Apart from

    this, you should not bring any books or other materials into the examination. A Frequently

    Asked Questions (FAQ) area on the module web-site is used to ensure that the whole class

    understands the examination conditions, and has access to advice where necessary.

    Assessment Workload

    Word-counts don’t make much sense in this kind of assignment, but you should budget as much

    time as you’d need to research and write a 2000 word essay. Because most of the assignment is

    individual, you can pass the module with 35% or more in the exam, provided your aggregate mark

    is above 40% not that it’s a problem, as most students do well on this module.

    Eric Bodger (Eric.Bodger@winchester.ac.uk) 3 February 2006 BS3909 15 April 2010 3 Information Systems in Business

    BS3909 Course Programme

    Information Systems in Business

Course introduction 7 Feb Week 1 EB

    Transforming Businesses through Information Systems

    Reading: Laudon & Laudon Management Information Systems Chapter 1 (at least) in any recent edition.

    Assignment handed out and explained

    The Strategic Role of Information Systems 14 Feb Week 2 EB

    Reading: Laudon & Laudon Chapter 2-3

    IS and Human Resource Management (after K Easterling) 21 Feb Week 3 EB

    Enhancing management decision making thththReading: Laudon & Laudon Ch 13 (9 & 7) Ch 11 (8) Decision Support conclusion 28 Feb Week 4 EB

    Redesigning with Information systems;

    thththReading: Laudon & Laudon Ch 14 (9) Ch 12 (8) Ch 10 (7). Approaches to systems building 7 Mar Week 5 EB thththReading: Laudon & Laudon Ch 14 (9) Ch 12 (8) Ch 10 (7) Guest lecture: Offshore development, Stephen Bullas, ECODE thReading: Laudon & Laudon 9 Edition Chapter 16 Managing the Information Systems Project 14 Mar Week 6 EB

    (developed from Guest Lecture by Alan Mordue)

    thththReading: Laudon & Laudon Ch 15 (9) Ch 13 (8) Ch 11 (7) Managing Knowledge how infrastructures can change the way 21 Mar Week 7 EB +

    we work. Alasdair White

    thth thReading: Laudon & Laudon Ch 10 (8) or Ch 12 (7& 9)

     Easter Vacation

    Electronic Commerce and Electronic Business 25 Apr Week 8 EB

    thththReading: Laudon & Laudon Ch 4 (9 ed) or Ch 9 (7 & 8) Information Systems Security and Control 2 May Week 9 EB

    thththReading: Laudon & Laudon Ch 10 (9 ed) or Ch 14 (7 & 8) Ethical and Social Impact of Information systems (after GW) 9 May Week 10 EB

    thththReading: Laudon & Laudon Ch 5 (9 or 8 edn) Ch 15 (7) Assignment Presentations 16 May Week 11 thMaterials to be handed in by Thursday 18 May EB+ano

    Feedback and Review of module 23 May Week 12 EB

    Managing International Information Systems

    thththPre-reading: Laudon & Laudon Ch 16 (9 or 7) or Ch 15 (8)

    After the first few weeks, this schedule may change to accommodate the availability of our guest thlecturers the presentations will be fixed at 16 May!

    BS3909 15 April 2010 4 Information Systems in Business

BS3909 Information Systems in Business

    Assignment Prepare to present on 16 May 2006 (Week 11)

     Materials due into Faculty Office on 18 May 2006

    Within a team of three (or two if you must): Select a business which has developed or is

    developing a strategy for integrating IT systems, or for pursuing new opportunities by using

    Information Technology. Use the Web, newspapers, journals and computer or business magazines

    to find out more about the organization and its use of information technology.

    Describe existing systems or new system, and consider some of the following areas (it’s unlikely

    they’ll all be relevant to your chosen enterprise):

    ? The competitive business environment. How could or do Information Systems help?

    ? What management, organization and technological issues does (or did) the business have to

    address in integrating or implementing their systems?

    ? Are there some areas that technology may not be able to address? What are they? (don’t feel

    obliged to invent them if there aren’t any).

    ? Propose some innovations or alternatives which may include some of the following

    ? an alternative approach to managing information;

    ? enhancing information available for management;

    ? Supply-chain management;

    ? Exploitation of Internet for marketing, e-commerce or e-business if you’re technically-

    minded, you can propose a high level design for a web site to achieve it.

    Your team is required to agree on a business to study, and plan a project to split up the work of the study among the team. Hand in (team) notes on the plan, including a list of tasks and a chart

    showing how they are scheduled. It may also include notes on your meetings, but full minutes are

    NOT required. Build a coherent presentation to give to the class in week 11 using suitable media,

    with each member of the team writing and delivering part of the presentation.

    As an individual, hand in notes of what you found out (these can be the same notes you presented

    in team discussions), and follow-on notes to say how the project plan worked out and reflecting

    on the process of building the presentation. Also hand in your individual contribution to the

    presentation (if they are integrated into a single handout, it is sufficient to identify the author of

    each page).

    Marks will be awarded on the following scheme:

    ? Individual 70% to cover:

    ? Your Contribution to the presentation (and your answers to the questions the markers ask)

    ? Quality of your contribution to the presentation materials;

    ? Other materials handed in (information you collected about the chosen business, plus your

    findings);

    ? Individual notes reflecting on what actually happened. This will almost certainly be less

    than a page, but it’s worth 20% of the module marks, and worth doing well. The idea is to

    get you to think about your research and learning process, and write down information that

    will improve your capability in the future. It’s not just a diary of what you all did.

    ? Team 30% to cover:

    ? Project planning (documented to show who does what and when, with Gantt chart);

    ? Coherence of study as demonstrated in presentation and handouts.

    Please hand in this sheet with your materials, on or before 18 May 2006.

    BS3909 15 April 2010 5 Information Systems in Business

Formal Description BS3909: Information Systems in Business

    2. KAC 15 Level 3 Status C Based on BS3003 Credits

    3. Subject: Business Management Type: Taught 4. Pre-requisites None

     Co-requisites None

    5. Aims/Learning Outcomes

    The objectives of the module include consideration of the following:

    a) the role and value of information systems in businesses and management; b) the interaction of Information Systems with Management Systems; c) the wider issues involved in systems design, in particular interaction of the system with the

    environment and the achievement of competitive edge through the use of IT; d) the relevance, necessity and method of managing the change introduced into the

    organization by introduction of a new system.

6. Catalogue Summary

    The course will demonstrate the ways in which Information Systems are integrated and deployed into

    businesses within the overall strategic objectives of an organization. In particular, it will cover the

    competitive advantages (and the risks) offered by Information Systems. Students will study the impact of Information Systems on an enterprise, and gain understanding of

    project management, a key aspect of deploying IS in business.

    7. Assessment Pattern Weight % Pass Req Comments

    Exam 50 40% on (Minimum 35% in each element)

    Aggregate Assignment 50

    8. Indicative Tutorial Team Eric Bodger, Mike Davies

    9. Indicative Teaching Methods Lectures, demonstrations, seminars, group-work.

    10. Indicative Learning Activities Indicative Learning ActivitiesHours Comments

    Lecture 26

    Seminars 13

    Student managed learning 96 Including group preparation for assessment.

    Total: 135

    BS3909 15 April 2010 6 Information Systems in Business

11. Sample Assignments

    Within a team of three (or two if you must): Select a business which has developed or is developing a

    strategy for integrating IT systems, or for pursuing new opportunities by using Information Technology.

    Use the Web, newspapers, journals and computer or business magazines to find out more about the

    organisation and its use of information technology.

    Describe existing systems or new systems and consider some of the following areas: The competitive business environment. How could or do Information Systems help? What management, organization and technological issues does (or did) the business have to

    address in integrating or implementing their systems?

    Are there some areas that technology may not be able to address? What are they? Propose some innovations or alternatives which may include some of the following

    an alternative approach to managing information;

    enhancing information available for management;

    Supply-chain management;

    Exploitation of Internet for marketing, e-commerce or e-business if you’re technically-

    minded, you can propose a high level design for a web site to achieve it.

    12. Indicative Outline Content

    The nature of information and Information Systems; Transforming Businesses through IS; The Strategic

    Role of IS; IS and Human Resource Management; Decision Support enhancing management decision making; Electronic Commerce and Electronic Business; Managing the IS Project; IS Security and Control; Knowledge Management; Ethical and Social Impact of IS. 13. Indicative Reading

    Module Text: Laudon, Kenneth C and Laudon, Jane P (2002). Management Information Systems (Prentice Hall).

    Robson, Wendy (1997): Strategic Management & Information Systems (Financial Times Pitman Publishing,

    DeMarco, Tom & Lister, Timothy (1999). Peopleware (Dorset House, NY). Boddy, D; Boonstra, A; Kennedy, G (2002). Managing Information Systems, an

    organizational perspective (Financial Times Prentice Hall).

    Alter, Steven (2002). Information Systems The Foundation of E-Business (Prentice Hall). O’Brien, James A (2000). Introduction to Information Systems Essentials for the Internetworked Enterprise (McGraw-Hill

    Lucey, T (1997). Management Information Systems (Letts).

    Brooks, Frederick P (1982). The Mythical Man-month (Addison-Wesley).

BS3909 15 April 2010 7 Information Systems in Business

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