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Engineers working in vehicle design are inundated with concerns about volume and there affect on the end user of the products. There are several examples of

    ITEDU 395 Design Brief

    Shape Shifting and the Volume Difference

    By Joshua Gish

    5539 Elkhorn Dr. Apt #112

    Indianapolis, Indiana 46254

Introduction:

    “Volume of a solid geometric figure is the amount of space it occupies, measured

    in the terms of three dimensions (length, width, and height).”( Cleaves, Dudenhefer,

    Hobbs, 1995)Our lives are affected by the calculation of volume everyday, whether it is

    the determining the amount of your favorite beverage you buy at a convenience store or

    how much gas you have to pump into your cars gas tank to get to school each day,

    volume affects everyone.

     For the engineers of tomorrow, volume will be an even more important aspect of

    design because of going green for the environment and the dwindling availability of

    resources on earth. It will be imperative engineers find inventive ways to reduce waste in

    every sector of daily life. Massive transportation systems such as semi tractor trailers are

    going to have to be more efficient in fuel economy yet still haul the same volume of

    cargo. The reduction of waste from semis might come from alterative fuel sources, but in

    reality the solution to the problem will be a culmination of answers. One of the answers

    will be vehicle design. A lot of vehicle design is currently taking place in Germany and

    Japan. There are signs that the population of these two countries are declining and will

    continue this trend causing a shift of where a large amount of automobile design will take

    place. This populous shift will likely bring the designing of automobiles back to the

    population centers of the United States of America. (Murray, 2008) According to Murry:

    “Germany and Japan will be putting facilities here because

    the human resources here. For automotive engineers, it

    means jobs will still be available, maybe even plentiful.

    They key, however, is training. If you’re an engineer whose

    expertise is building physical prototypes, then the out look

    may not be so good, but if you’re in the forefront of

    working with math models, then you’re in a pretty good

    spot. There’s also going to be huge demand for people who

    are capable in software and controls” (Murray, 2008, p. 10).

    Engineers working in vehicle design are inundated with concerns

    about volume and there affect on the end user of the products. There are

    several examples of volume in vehicle design such as, cabin comfort, cargo

    space in trunks, number of passenger capacity, and cargo capacity in the bed

    of a truck.

    According to Peckham, the fields of construction and manufacturing

    are also going to need capable designers that have a handle on the

    differences and advantages of different volumes and there strengths

    according to the reduction of the use of materials. (Peckham, 2008, p. 4)

    This design brief is designed to apply concepts that will be pertinent

    to future designers such as the concepts of, surface area calculation, volume

    calculation, geometric dimensioning and toleranceing, measuring, and

reflection of designs. After completing this brief the student will have a

    better understanding of, the process of design from conception to

    completion, and the differences in shapes that hold the same amount of

    volume.

Key Definitions:

    “Area = the size of the region enclosed by the two dimensional figure.

    Corbitt, Kalin, 1990) (measured in inches squared).” (

    Cup: A cup is an English unit of measure for volume.

     “Hypotenuse = side of a right triangle that is opposite the right angle.”

    (Corbitt, Kalin, 1990)

    “Volume = Volume of a solid geometric figure is the amount of space it occupies,

    measured in the terms of three dimensions (length, width, and height).”( Cleaves,

    Dudenhefer, Hobbs, 1995) (measured in inches cubed)

    Conversions:

     1cup = 8 ounces

     8 ounces = 14.44 cubic inches 31cup = 14.44 cubic inches (in)

The Challenge:

    Have the student calculate the size of a geometric shape from a list of shapes

    provided by the instructor, the shape is to hold two cups of flower plus or minus

    one quarter of a cup. Next, the student is to build the selected shape out of

    cardboard and duct tape. The constructed shape will then be filled with flower.

    The contents of the shape (flower) will then be poured into a measuring cup to

    determine if the volume calculations for the constructed shape were correct and

    held a volume of two cups plus or minus one quarter cup.

    Objectives:

    Given the information on the design brief and with help of the instructor the student will be able to calculate the volume of a selected geometric shape with 87.5 percent accuracy. (+/- ? cup)

    Given the information on the design brief and help from the instructor the student will be able to fill out the layout work sheet with 100 percent accuracy.

    Given the step by step example from the design brief the student will be able to construct his or her individual geometric shape from the layout worksheet with

    cardboard and tape to 87.5 percent accuracy. (+/- ? cup)

    After performing the laboratory experience the student will compare their shape with one other class member’s constructed shape then the student will write a

    paragraph explaining the following;

    Comment on whether their shape larger or smaller then expected

    Comment on the success or failure of the student’s individual shape and

    why it did or didn’t hold the specified amount according to the tolerance

    specified.

    Comment on the size of the student’s individual shape compared to one

    other student’s constructed shape

    Materials / Equipment:

    o Card Board

    o Razor Knife or Scissors

    o Tape

    o Pencil or Pen

    o Worksheet

    o Scientific Calculator

    o One Cup Measuring Cup

    o Four-Cup Measuring Bowel

    o One Bag of Flower

    o Ruler

    o Compass

    Limitations / Requirements:

    o The student is limited the information and materials provided by the

    instructor and this design brief.

    o The constructed shape is to hold two cups of flower plus or minus one

    quarter of a cup.

    Procedures:

1. Read the complete design brief.

    2. Select a shape to construct from the following list:

    i. Square

    ii. Rectangle

    iii. Triangle

    iv. Square Pyramid

    v. Cylinder

    3. Obtain a corresponding worksheet from the instructor according to the

    shape that was chosen.

    4. Retrieve the materials from the materials / equipment list from the

    instructor.

    5. Calculate the volume of two cups using a scientific calculator.

    6. Calculate the dimensions of you individual shape using a scientific

    calculator according to the volume of two cups and the formulas on the

    worksheet.

    7. Fill out the worksheet diagrams for the individual shape according to the

    shape calculations.

    8. Construct the individual shape according to the diagram on the worksheet

    using cardboard, tape, a ruler, pencil or pen, razor knife or scissors, and a

    compass if need be.

    9. Fill the shape fully with flower using the one-cup measuring cup.

    10. Dump the flower inside the constructed shape into a four-cup measuring

    cup.

11. Measure the flower inside the four-cup measuring cup and record the data

    onto the worksheet.

12. Write a paragraph on the back of the worksheet:

    Commenting on whether their shape larger or smaller then expected.

    Commenting on the success or failure of the student’s individual shape

    and why it did or didn’t hold the specified amount according to the

    tolerance specified.

    Commenting on the size of the student’s individual shape compared to

    one other student’s constructed shape.

    Square Worksheet:

Perform the necessary calculations then fill out the diagram below:

    Square: 2) Surface Area = Length * Width (in3 Volume = Length * Width * Height (in)

    Red Line = Width

    Blue Line = Length

    Green Line = Height

     Length:

     Height:

     Width:

Record the actual volume held: ___________

Write a paragraph on the back of this worksheet about expectations in individual size,

    capacity held, and size compared to one another students shape.

    Rectangle Worksheet:

Perform the necessary calculations then fill out the diagram below:

    Rectangle: 2) Surface Area = Length * Width (in3 Volume = Length * Width * Height (in)

    Red Line = Length

    Blue Line = Width

    Green Line = Height

     Width:

     Height:

     Length:

Record the actual volume held: ___________

Write a paragraph on the back of this worksheet about expectations in individual size,

    capacity held, and size compared to one another students shape.

    Triangle Worksheet:

Perform the necessary calculations then fill out the diagram below:

    Triangle: 2) Surface Area = ? * Base * Height (in3 Volume = ? * Base * Height * Depth (in)

    Red Line = Base

    Blue Line = Height

    Green Line = Depth

    Base :

     Height :

     Depth :

Record the actual volume held: ___________

Write a paragraph on the back of this worksheet about expectations in individual size,

    capacity held, and size compared to one another students shape.

    Square Pyramid Worksheet:

Perform the necessary calculations then fill out the diagram below:

    Square Pyramid: 222 + B = C Pythagorean Theorem = A2Base Area = Length * Length (in) 3 Volume = 1/3 * Base Area * Height (in)

    Red Line = Length

    Blue Line = Length

    Green Line = Height

    Length:

     Height: (of triangle not pyramid)

Record the actual volume held: ___________

Write a paragraph on the back of this worksheet about expectations in individual size,

    capacity held, and size compared to one another students shape.

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