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Options for Renewable Bioenergy

By Carlos Sullivan,2014-03-30 22:35
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Those services include pollution clean up, treatment of water and wastewater, capture of renewable energy, and directly improving human health

Forum #7: “Truly Renewable Bioenergy Using Microorganisms:

     The Carbon-Neutral Conversion of Biomass into Fuel”

    Speaker: Bruce Rittmann, PhD

     Director of ASU’s Center for Environmental Biotechnology

    Date: Thursday, February 12, 2009

    Time: Doors Open at 5:30 pm and the Program Begins at 6:00 pm

     Heavy Appetizers Will Be Served

    Location: The University Club, 39 E. Monte Vista Road, Phoenix

    Dr. Bruce Rittmann, director of the Center for Environmental Biotechnology in the Biodesign Institute at ASU, is an international leader in the use of microbial communities to provide services to society. Those services include pollution clean up, treatment of water and wastewater, capture of renewable energy, and directly improving human health. Dr. Rittmann was elected to the National Academy of Engineering in 2004. He is a Fellow of the AAAS, a recipient of the Clarke Prize for Outstanding Achievement in Water Science and Technology, a winner of the Huber Research Prize from ASCE, and one of the world's most highly cited researchers, according to ISI.

    The only viable strategy for slowing and ultimately reversing global warming is to greatly reduce our society’s use of fossil fuels. Achieving this goal will require that we find alternatives that are renewable and carbon neutral. The most promising approach for making a large shift away from fossil fuels is bioenergy, in which biomass formed directly or indirectly from photosynthesis is converted into energy forms useful to human society. The biomass sources include plant crops and photosynthetic microorganisms grown for this purpose, plant residues, animal wastes, industrial wastes, and human wastes. These diffuse and sometimes noxious biomass sources can be converted by microorganisms into a range of energy carriers that humans can use: e.g., methane, hydrogen, biodiesel, and electricity. Dr. Rittmann’s presentation outlines the challenges of renewable bioenergy and describes several promising options by which microorganisms can produced truly renewable bioenergy in large amounts and without damaging the environment or disrupting the human food supply.

Cost: $20.00/person for Club Members & Guests

     $30.00/person for Non-Members

Please Make Your Reservation

    Online at www.harvardclub.org

Alternatively, you may contact Michael Martin and

    mail a check payable to the “Harvard Club of

    Phoenix” to the address below.

    E-mail: mikejmartin@earthlink.net

    Phone: 415/601-5590

    Michael Martin

    4725 N. Scottsdale Road, Suite 200

    Scottsdale, AZ 85258

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