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Custodial Procedures Manual

By Dolores Cole,2014-08-12 19:13
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Custodial Procedures Manual ...

    CUSTODIAL CARE PROGRAM

    NAME OF SCHOOL DISTRICT

    NAME OF SCHOOL (OPTIONAL)

     DATE

    Table of Contents

    IMPORTANCE OF THE CUSTODIAN‟S JOB .................................................................................. 1 PUBLIC RELATIONS ....................................................................................................................... 1 GROUNDS ...................................................................................................................................... 1 LIGHTS ............................................................................................................................................ 1 SAFETY RECOMMENDTIONS ....................................................................................................... 3 Rolling Personnel Lifts .................................................................................................................. 3 Chemical and Cleaning Solutions ................................................................................................. 3 CLEANING EQUIPMENT AND USES.............................................................................................. 5 Custodians Carts .......................................................................................................................... 5 Mop Bucket and Press ................................................................................................................. 5 Wet Mops ..................................................................................................................................... 5 Dust Mops .................................................................................................................................... 5 Push Brooms and Corn Brooms ................................................................................................... 5 Vacuum Cleaners ......................................................................................................................... 6 Floor Machine (Buffer) .................................................................................................................. 6 Carpet Extractors ......................................................................................................................... 6 CLEANING PROCEDURES ............................................................................................................. 7 Entrances, Lobbies and Corridors ................................................................................................ 7 Classrooms and Laboratories ....................................................................................................... 8 Office, Lounge and Conference Rooms ........................................................................................ 9 Restrooms, Locker Rooms and Showers ...................................................................................... 9 Cafeterias and Lunch Areas ....................................................................................................... 10 Shop Areas................................................................................................................................. 10 Gyms and Multipurpose Rooms.................................................................................................. 10 METHODS AND PROCEDURES................................................................................................... 12 Assembling Equipment and Supplies.......................................................................................... 12 Drinking Fountains...................................................................................................................... 12 Chalkboards and Marker Boards ................................................................................................ 12 Dusting ....................................................................................................................................... 13 Cleaning Classroom Sinks and Counters ................................................................................... 13 Dust Mopping Resilient Floors .................................................................................................... 13 Trash .......................................................................................................................................... 14 Carpet Vacuuming ...................................................................................................................... 14 Spot Cleaning ............................................................................................................................. 14 Restroom Cleaning ..................................................................................................................... 15

    Refilling Dispensers ................................................................................................................ 15

    Cleaning Sinks and Wash Basins ........................................................................................... 15

    Mirrors .................................................................................................................................... 16

    Urinals and Toilet Bowls.......................................................................................................... 16

    Bathroom Walls and Partitions: ............................................................................................... 16

    Bathroom and Shower Floors: (Does not include wood floors) ................................................ 17 Shower Rooms, Locker Rooms and Dressing Rooms ................................................................ 17

    Trash ...................................................................................................................................... 17

    Benches Furniture and Lockers .............................................................................................. 17

    Floor Surfaces ........................................................................................................................ 18 Vomit Cleanup ............................................................................................................................ 18 Gym and Multi-Purpose Room Floors ......................................................................................... 18 DISTRICT PRESCRIBED CLEANERS .......................................................................................... 20 STANDARDS FOR CLEAN CLASSROOMS .................................................................................. 23 MASTER CUSTODIAL SCHEDULE .............................................................................................. 25

Custodial Procedures Guidelines

IMPORTANCE OF THE CUSTODIAN’S JOB

    The process of teaching children in school involves not only the teacher, but support staff and parents whose services contribute directly or indirectly to their educational growth. In the course of the day-to-day work, it may seem that it is an endless job of cleaning rooms that will be dirty again tomorrow. As true as this may be, it should be remembered that how well you do your job can affect not only the health and safety of the children, but the morale and atmosphere of the entire school. Custodians are responsible primarily for cleaning the school building. Buildings, equipment, and grounds are in your care. Operations and preventative maintenance includes security to prevent vandalism and theft. The community, teachers, and pupils take pride in a well kept attractive school and will help you keep it that way.

PUBLIC RELATIONS

    The principal or head teacher needs the assistance of professional custodians. The district realizes the importance of the custodian‟s position and appreciates the fact that a clean, well-kept, properly

    heated and ventilated building favorably affects the teachers in their teaching and the children in their learning. You can gain good will for the school through efficiency and a friendly attitude toward pupils, teachers, and visitors. The public expects all district employees to be dependable, courteous and cheerful.

    Custodians are a part of the school‟s team. As a team member, you are expected to support all staff in a manner which will reinforce their efforts in the performance of their duties. When it is necessary for custodians to go into a classroom during class time, please enter very quietly and do whatever is necessary with as little commotion as possible.

GROUNDS

    It is a daily duty to do the following:

    1. Remove ice and snow from required areas immediately. Sand and ice melt should be

    applied to prevent injury.

    2. Remove paper, cans, and trash from the grounds.

    3. Keep the playground equipment in safe condition. Any hazard to the children should be

    repaired or reported immediately.

LIGHTS

    Custodians are responsible for proper lighting in the schools. This responsibility includes the following:

    1. Replace burned out bulbs and tubes by using standardized energy efficient lights

    prescribed by the district.

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2. Turn lights off in unoccupied rooms.

    3. Turn out all lights, except for security lights and check that outside lights are on before

    leaving the school at night.

    4. Check the lighting control time clocks “weekly” for proper operation.

    5. Know the location of all light switches, fuse boxes, and breaker boxes. 6. Clean fixtures and lens annually.

    7. Replace burned out light bulbs and tubes with new bulbs of the same size (wattage). 8. Be sure your non-conductive (wooden or fiberglass) ladder is of the proper height and is

    safe.

    9. Handle fixtures properly to avoid shocks or cuts.

Note:

    Code requires that exit and emergency lights be lit at all times, day or night. Change both tubes on fluorescent fixtures-never only one. This will increase the life of the ballast, give better light, and reduce the frequency of tube changes.

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SAFETY RECOMMENDTIONS

    Never leave a slick spot or any foreign material on the floor that may be hazardous to the occupants of the building. Always put out safety precaution signs where a floor may be wet from mopping or leaking water.

    Rolling Personnel Lifts

    1. Do not move lift with workers on the platform.

    2. Remove or make certain material or equipment will not fall from platform.

    3. Watch for holes or floor debris when moving the platform.

    4. Never climb aboard with oily hands or shoes.

    5. Never use ladders or makeshift devices on top of lift to increase height.

    6. Inspect machine frequently for defects.

    7. If equipped with outrigger, make sure they are extended before extending lift.

    8. Barricade a safety zone around the machine when others are in the area.

    9. Use extra care when rolling on inclines or ramps.

    10. Never conduct a lift except on level, even terrain.

Chemical and Cleaning Solutions

    Most chemicals used by the school district come in a highly concentrated form and must be diluted before use. Some are in dispensing systems that dilute automatically. Always read the instructions and the material safety data sheets for each product. The following safety rules are for your protection; however, they will not be of any help if you don‟t use them (Only dilute with water).

    1. Ensure that Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) are accessible and that all maintenance

    and custodial personnel as well as administration are aware of their location. Periodically

    review your MSDS sheets to ensure that they are current and reference chemicals that are

    currently in use. KNOW THE PROPER FIRST AID PROCEDURES FOR ALL CHEMICALS

    USED IN THE SCHOOL THAT HAVE THE ABILITY TO CAUSE HARM TO BUILDING

    OCCUPANTS AND WORKERS.

    2. Know what you are using. Do not use chemicals from unmarked bottles or containers.

    3. Always read the label and follow the instructions.

    4. Measure all chemicals. If the directions say to use four (4) ounces in one (1) gallon of water,

    measure the water and the chemical correctly. A weak solution may not provide the proper

    cleaning power. A solution that is too strong will not only waste supplies, but will damage the

    surface on which you use it. It may also have the potential to cause injury to yourself or

    others.

    5. Do not substitute chemicals. Many chemicals are made only for specific jobs.

    6. Never mix chemicals. You can easily destroy a chemical‟s usefulness or possibly create a

    poisonous gas or solution by mixing it with other chemicals.

    7. Do not get in the habit of smelling chemicals as a means of identification. A deep breath of

    the fumes from some chemicals can and will injure you.

    8. Protect yourself with the appropriate personal protection, i.e., safety glasses, rubber gloves,

    or protective clothing, if the solution you are using is a strong acid or alkali.

    9. Always secure bottle caps and lids before the container leaves your hands.

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    10. Label all containers with the district approved Hazardous Material Information Sheet (HMIS)

    label that reflects product name, health and hazard information, and required personal

    protection equipment.

    11. Do not store harsh or liquid chemicals on overhead shelves.

    12. Do not store heavy containers on overhead shelves.

    13. Use proper ventilation at all times.

    14. Store all flammable products in flammable, ventilated cabinets.

    Note: Do not bring chemicals from home and do not purchase chemicals from anyplace other

    than vendors prescribed by the district.

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CLEANING EQUIPMENT AND USES

    The need for proper care of equipment cannot be overemphasized. A job can be no better than the

    person that does it or the equipment used. Equipment that has proper care will stay in use much longer. It will be safer for the operator to use and will enable the custodian to do a better job. After each use, make it a practice to clean equipment and store it properly. Inspect power equipment daily. If equipment needs repairs, contact the building custodian. Ensure that electrical cords and connectors are grounded and in good condition. Any cords that have had the grounding prong removed or broken or where the cord is frayed should be immediately taken out of service. Do not use equipment until it has been fully repaired.

Custodians Carts

    The custodian‟s cart is one of the most useful tools in building housekeeping. It is designed to carry all necessary equipment needed by the custodian.

    1. Several cleaning tools or products can be readily available by using the „caddy‟ with pockets.

    2. Keep cart clean, stocked and stored properly.

    3. Empty all trash into dumpster each shift.

Mop Bucket and Press

    1. Clean after use and store properly.

    2. Buckets will last longer if emptied, dried, and turned upside down to store.

Wet Mops

    1. Consist of long strands of twisted cotton yarn secured by a band at the top.

    2. The most common size mop head is 24 ounces.

    Note: Wet mops should be rinsed out well each time they are used, wrung as dry as

    possible, and then after shaking the strands apart, hung with the head up where they

    will dry. If stored very long in a damp place, wet mops will mildew and develop an

    odor that will render them unfit for use.

Dust Mops

    1. Consists of twisted cotton yarn strands secured to a band for attaching to the dust mop

    handle.

    2. Available in a variety of sizes and shapes.

    3. Most commonly used sizes are 24”, 48”, and 60” plus „wedge‟ mops.

    4. Can be used with cleaning solutions, or treated with oil for dust control.

    5. Can be laundered.

Push Brooms and Corn Brooms

    1. Made from various materials depending upon the job they are designed for.

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    2. Used primarily for sweeping sidewalks, entries, and other non-finished surfaces.

    3. Will raise a lot of dust into air, unless used with care.

    4. Do not use on finished floors.

Vacuum Cleaners

    In the matter of dirt removal from the premises, there is no substitute which even approaches

    the vacuum cleaner for thoroughness. The suction of the vacuum cleaner pulls all loose

    particles into its flow, including those in corners and around furniture, preventing the gradual

    accumulation in difficult places. On carpeting it draws the embedded dust out of the pile. Grit

    left in the carpeting, cuts the pile and hastens the deterioration of the carpeting.

    1. The industrial vacuum cleaner performs another function which is almost as necessary and

    quite as effective as picking up dry accumulations. Most industrial vacuum cleaners are or

    can be adapted for picking up water and are, therefore, highly efficient for removing scrub

    water from resilient floors.

    2. Vacuum cleaners must be emptied each shift (or otherwise as necessary).

    3. Filters are to be cleaned regularly to insure maximum air-flow and to extend the life of the

    motor.

    4. Clean machine exterior also, and store properly.

    5. Teachers may use vacuum cleaners as needed.

    6. Vacuum cleaners may only be used by students under adult supervision.

Floor Machine (Buffer)

    The floor machine is an indispensable machine for maintaining resilient floors. It can also be used for spot-cleaning carpets when equipped with solution tank and shampoo brush.

    1. 20” machines are most commonly used for polishing, scrubbing, and stripping resilient floors.

    2. 13” machines used primarily for spot-shampooing or traffic lane shampooing and be used in

    conjunction with extractors.

Carpet Extractors

    Carpet Extractors provide the most efficient method of cleaning carpets. Most are designed to inject a solution of plain water and detergents (under pressure) into the carpet. This solution is then agitated by a powered brush and the soiled solution is then extracted by means of a powerful vacuum, removing soils and most of the moisture. The use of fans after a carpet has been cleaned will help speed the drying process and help prevent the growth of mildew.

    1. Individuals can be easily trained to operate these machines.

    2. Removes more soil than any other practical system.

    3. Leaves carpets damp/dry if equipment is used properly.

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CLEANING PROCEDURES

    This section discusses cleaning procedures by function. It provides information on daily, weekly and other cleaning procedures in these areas:

    1. Entrances, Lobbies, and Corridors.

    2. Classrooms and laboratories.

    3. Offices, lounges, and conference rooms.

    4. Restrooms, Locker rooms, Showers and Dressing Areas.

    5. Cafeterias and lunch areas.

    6. Shops and other service areas.

    7. Gyms and multipurpose rooms.

Entrances, Lobbies and Corridors

    These areas are generally the first areas seen by students, staff and visitors. Their condition and cleanliness leaves a lasting impression on all that enter the building. It is of the utmost importance that these areas are maintained to a standard of excellence.

    Considerable dirt is carried in and deposited in entryways and corridors. The custodian‟s schedule should include adequate time to sweep these areas of travel more often than once a day. Regular sweeping or snow removal from the sidewalks outside of entryway doors will prevent some dirt and sand from entering the building. Snow and ice should be removed from the entryway as soon as possible using sand or ice melt to avoid slips and falls. Use only those ice melt products that are approved by the school district. Some entryways have floor mats to serve as a dirt and sand trap. These must be cleaned periodically, or daily during the „mud‟ season. Entryway carpet is cleaned most effectively with an extractor running the rinse cycle 1-3 times. Fans need to be on during this process to speed drying and help prevent mildew.

Daily:

    ; Empty waste receptacles, remove debris, police entrance for snow, leaves, and litter, and

    remove.

    ; If floor is resilient tile, dust mop floors with a wide, treated dust mop, keeping the dust mop

    head on the floor at all times. Pick up soil from floor with dustpan. With a lightly dampened

    mop, spot-mop floors as necessary to remove soil.

    ; Vacuum carpet areas and mats; remove gum and soil spots.

    ; Disinfect drinking fountains. (see following procedures)

    ; Clean entrance door glass.

Weekly:

    ; Dust the tops of lockers, fire closets, extinguishers and window casings. (Low dusting, below

    5‟)

    ; Clean glass partitions, display cases, and interior door glass.

    ; Spot-clean finger marks and smudges on walls, door facings, and doors. Use detergent

    solution in spray bottle and a cloth.

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    ; Dust Furniture.

    ; Restore floor finish on non-carpeted floors.

Monthly:

    ; High dust vents, lights, pipes, venetian blinds, over doorways, hanging light fixtures and

    connecting and horizontal wall surfaces. (High dusting, above 5‟)

    Note: When cleaning stairways, on a routine schedule clean out the corners and the edges of

    each step. Remove gum, etc. with a putty knife. Damp mop or spot clean as

    necessary.

Classrooms and Laboratories

    There is more time spent in classroom cleaning than any other phase of custodial duties. Valuable time and many steps can be saved by careful planning. Due to the many different types of furniture and equipment used in the classroom, a careful analysis should be made to determine how to clean each room in the shortest time with the fewest steps and still maintain the required standard of cleanliness. To keep a classroom clean will entail much more than just sweeping the floor and dusting the furniture. It will require a custodian with a willingness to work, a custodian who takes pride in his/her work and one who is interested in the welfare of the youngsters. Some classrooms will have desks that may be shifted from side to side each day as you clean the floor, while others have tables that can only be moved a few inches. Some furniture in the rooms can be rolled away from the wall to make sweeping easier; other furniture is stationary and must be cleaned around and underneath. Tables and desks must be wiped off with disinfectant. The custodian cart will hold the necessary equipment and materials to clean classrooms.

    Classrooms should have adequate lighting. Check for burned out tubes or bulbs and replace them with bulbs of the same wattage.

    Daily:

    ; Empty waste receptacles and replace liners.

    ; Clean marker boards, chalk boards and chalk trays.

    ; Vacuum traffic patterns on carpets floors; remove gum and soil spots.

    ; Dust mop and wet mop tiled floors.

    ; Clean glass in doors and partitions.

    Weekly:

    ; Dust furniture surfaces and damp clean desk and table tops. (low dusting, below 5 feet)

    ; Empty pencil sharpeners.

    ; Vacuum carpeted areas thoroughly.

    ; Clean door surfaces.

    Twice Monthly:

    ; Restore floor finish on non-carpeted floors.

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