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_NC Family Assessment Scale

By Bruce Jordan,2014-08-12 18:09
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_NC Family Assessment Scale ...

    NCFAS: North Carolina Family Assessment Scale

    for Intensive Family Preservation Services Programs

     Version 2.0

    DEFINITIONS

     A. Environment

1.Overall Clear Strength Mild Baseline /Adequate. Mild Moderate Serious Problem

    Environment S. P. P.

     +2 +1 0 -1 -2 -3

     Refers to family Refers to family Refers to family receiving very

    receiving very high experiencing minimal low ratings in the following

    ratings in the following problems in the following areas: housing stability, safety in

    areas: housing areas: housing stability, the community, housing

    stability, safety in the safety in the cmty, housing habitability,

    community, housing habitab., income/employ., income/employment, financial

    habitability, finan. mgmt, food & management, food and nutrition,

    income/employment, nutrition, personal personal hygiene, transportation,

    financial management, hygiene, transport., & and learning environment.

    food and nutrition, learning envt. However,

    personal hygiene, problems do not interfere

    transportation, and in family’s ability to

    learning environment. function, & problems do

    not need to be addressed.

2. Housing Clear Strength Mild Baseline/Adequate Mild Moderate Serious Problem

    Stability S. P. P.

     +2 +1 0 -1 -2 -3

     Refers to family Refers to family Refers to family being

    occupying the same, experiencing or previously threatened with eviction.

    adequate residence for experiencing minor Unable to meet rent or

    more than three years. problems in remaining in mortgage obligations on time,

    If less than three years, the same residence, but or at all. Or, family does not

    move is prompted by a family is relatively capable have housing, is living with

    job change or move to of meeting financial different relatives or friends, or

    better housing, etc. obligations, present living in a homeless shelter.

    Rent/mortgage are paid housing is not threatened, Family is not satisfied with

    on time. There are no and family members are living situation.

    problems meeting not inhibited in pursuing

    financial obligations of other obligations due to

    rent or mortgage. these problems.

    1 NCFAS: North Carolina Family Assessment Scale, Version 2.0, Kirk, R. S., and Reed Ashcraft, K, 06/98 This instrument is derived from previous versions based on the Family Assessment Form, developed at the Children’s Bureau of Southern California, Michigan’s Family Assessment of Needs Form, and four assessment instruments developed in North Carolina by Haven House (Raleigh), Home Remedies (Morganton), Methodist Home for Children (Raleigh), and the state Division of Mental Health, Developmental Disabilities and Substance Abuse Services. Special acknowledgments are due to Sandy Sladen and Judith Nelson at the Children’s Bureau of Southern California and to researchers Jacquelyn McCroskey and William Meezan at U. of Southern California. Special thanks also are due to numerous local IFPS providers in North Carolina for participating in the ongoing development and field testing of the NCFAS. Domain specifications for the original NCFAS were based on the work of Meezan and McCroskey. Domains and subscales for Version 2.0 are based upon reliability and validity testing completed in the Fall of 1997.

3. Safety in Clear Strength Mild Baseline/Adequate Mild P. Moderate Serious Problem

    Community S. P.

     +2 +1 0 -1 -2 -3

     Refers to a safe and Refers to minor Refers to many disturbances

    secure neighborhood disturbances in the such as fights and/or outbursts

    for the children. neighborhood, but in the neighborhood. The

    Parents can allow disturbances do not neighborhood is not safe for

    children to play outside prevent family members children to play outdoors or

    without fear. Neighbors and children from walk to the bus or to school.

    look out for each other spending time outside in Evidence of violence, “boarded

    (i.e., neighborhood the community. up” or barred windows, gun

    “watch.”) fire, the use of alcohol or drugs,

     and/or drug “trafficking” in the

    neighborhood. Neighbors

    fearful of “getting involved.”

4.Habitability Clear Strength Mild Baseline/Adequate Mild Moderate P. Serious Problem

    of Housing S. P.

     +2 +1 0 -1 -2 -3

     Refers to family and Refers to minimal Refers to unsanitary situations,

    neighbors problems in the home, including roaches, litter, clutter,

    experiencing home as such as slight and/or unpleasant odors present

    “warm.” Home is very overcrowding, or some in the home. Food particles

    clean and neat. Plenty clutter. However, most and/or rotting food on the

    of space and privacy safety precautions are counters and tables. Urine-

    for children. Plenty of taken (e.g., poisons are out soaked or stained furniture,

    furnishings in good of sight but not locked). dirty diapers, dirty dishes,

    repair. Safety Minor house repairs (e.g., overflowing garbage, and/or

    precautions are crumbling plaster) may be animal or human feces on the

    considered and taken, evident, but do not require floor. Hesitance to sit down or

    such as the use of immediate attention. enter the home.

    smoke alarms and Nonfunctioning plumbing,

    dead bolts on outside and/or no electricity. Many

    doors. Poisonous items hazards within the reach of

    are kept locked and children, such as guns, knives,

    out of children’s reach. street drugs, or open medication

    Plumbing is in good and poisons.

    condition.

    2 NCFAS: North Carolina Family Assessment Scale, Version 2.0, Kirk, R. S., and Reed Ashcraft, K, 06/98 This instrument is derived from previous versions based on the Family Assessment Form, developed at the Children’s Bureau of Southern California, Michigan’s Family Assessment of Needs Form, and four assessment instruments developed in North Carolina by Haven House (Raleigh), Home Remedies (Morganton), Methodist Home for Children (Raleigh), and the state Division of Mental Health, Developmental Disabilities and Substance Abuse Services. Special acknowledgments are due to Sandy Sladen and Judith Nelson at the Children’s Bureau of Southern California and to researchers Jacquelyn McCroskey and William Meezan at U. of Southern California. Special thanks also are due to numerous local IFPS providers in North Carolina for participating in the ongoing development and field testing of the NCFAS. Domain specifications for the original NCFAS were based on the work of Meezan and McCroskey. Domains and subscales for Version 2.0 are based upon reliability and validity testing completed in the Fall of 1997.

5. Income/ Clear Strength Mild Baseline/Adequate Mild Moderate P. Serious Problem

    Employment S. P.

     +2 +1 0 -1 -2 -3

     Refers to family Refers to family having Refers to family losing employ.

    having stable relatively stable employ. in for “negative” reasons 2 or

    employment and the past 12 mos. Income more times in the past 12 mo. &

    income over the past is suffic. in meeting basic inability to pay for food,

    12 months. More than needs, such as food, rent, housing &/or clothing. Family

    enough income to pay and clothing. There are receives public assist., and/or

    for food, housing, some money pressures, primary caretakers are

    and/or clothing. such as credit card debt, unemployed. Money is a major

    Money is not an issue. but they do not issue. Child support is not

    Family has money to significantly inhibit family paid. Public assist. has been

    meet responsibilities activities or present canceled. Family does not have

    and spend on leisure purchase of necessites. money to meet basic needs.

    activities.

6. Financial Clear Strength Mild Baseline/Adequate Mild Moderate P. Serious Problem

    Management S. P.

     +2 +1 0 -1 -2 -3

     Refers to family using Refers to family having Refers to family being severely

    money in a way that debts, but debts are under in debt. Family has a history

    provides benefits control. Some problems within the past year of being

    financially, and family with budgeting, but evicted from their home due to

    has clear spending problems do not prevent bills. Great difficulty paying

    plans or priorities. family from meeting basic bills, and/or bills are paid late.

    Debts are small and needs for food, rent, etc. Chaotic budgeting, and family

    manageable. There is is constantly in crisis over

    a planned use of money. Frequently broke, due

    money, and no back to betting or gambling. No

    bills. Family is good at budget plan. Luxuries are

    bargain hunting. bought before necessities.

7. Food/ Clear Strength Mild Baseline/Adequate Mild Moderate P. Serious Problem

    Nutrition S. P.

     +2 +1 0 -1 -2 -3

     Refers to caretakers’ Family meets basic Refers to caretakers’ lack of

    awareness of nutritional nutrional needs. Children awareness of nutritional needs

    needs of children, have access to sufficient of children, including any

    including any special and varied food, though special needs. Does not

    needs. Meets those individual meals may bot attempt to meet nutritional

    needs. Prepares always be “balanced.” needs. Does not consider food

    balanced, nutritious preparation important.

    meals. Ample food Inadequate supply of food,

    available. Children eat and/or inappropriate food. Lots

    on a regular schedule. of “junk” food consumed.

    Food/nutrition actively Children often go hungry.

    “monitored” by caretakers.

    3 NCFAS: North Carolina Family Assessment Scale, Version 2.0, Kirk, R. S., and Reed Ashcraft, K, 06/98 This instrument is derived from previous versions based on the Family Assessment Form, developed at the Children’s Bureau of Southern California, Michigan’s Family Assessment of Needs Form, and four assessment instruments developed in North Carolina by Haven House (Raleigh), Home Remedies (Morganton), Methodist Home for Children (Raleigh), and the state Division of Mental Health, Developmental Disabilities and Substance Abuse Services. Special acknowledgments are due to Sandy Sladen and Judith Nelson at the Children’s Bureau of Southern California and to researchers Jacquelyn McCroskey and William Meezan at U. of Southern California. Special thanks also are due to numerous local IFPS providers in North Carolina for participating in the ongoing development and field testing of the NCFAS. Domain specifications for the original NCFAS were based on the work of Meezan and McCroskey. Domains and subscales for Version 2.0 are based upon reliability and validity testing completed in the Fall of 1997.

8. Personal Clear Strength Mild Baseline/Adequate Mild Moderate P. Serious Problem

    Hygiene S. P.

     +2 +1 0 -1 -2 -3

     Refers to children Refers to children Refers to constant appearance

    looking clean and well occasionally wearing of children as unkempt or dirty.

    groomed. Children inappropriate clothing or Appearance of adults as

    have plenty of clothing, appearing unkempt. unkempt. Noticeable poor

    appropriate to the However, appearance or personal hygiene, obviously

    season. Adults look inappropriate clothing is poor dental hygiene, and/or

    clean and well-not causing problems for body odor. Lack of awareness

    groomed. Adults have the family or children. of children or adults of personal

    plenty of clothing hygiene and grooming. Dress is

    appropriate to the inappropriate to the season.

    season. Awareness of

    personal hygiene and

    grooming. Take pride

    in themselves.

9. Transporta-Clear Strength Mild Baseline/Adequate Mild Moderate P. Serious Problem

    tion S. P.

     +2 +1 0 -1 -2 -3

     Refers to family Refers to family having Refers to family not having

    having a car, or fairly regular access to transportation available which

    regular access to a car reliable transportation. in turn, inhibits work, increases

    or public Occasionally, social isolation, and/or limits

    transportation. transportation difficulties access to services, and/or

    Reliable will cause a problem for prevents regular school

    transportation allows family (e.g., arriving late attendance.

    family to meet to work because of

    obligations such as difficulties).

    doctors’ visits,

    school, or regular

    work attendance.

    4 NCFAS: North Carolina Family Assessment Scale, Version 2.0, Kirk, R. S., and Reed Ashcraft, K, 06/98 This instrument is derived from previous versions based on the Family Assessment Form, developed at the Children’s Bureau of Southern California, Michigan’s Family Assessment of Needs Form, and four assessment instruments developed in North Carolina by Haven House (Raleigh), Home Remedies (Morganton), Methodist Home for Children (Raleigh), and the state Division of Mental Health, Developmental Disabilities and Substance Abuse Services. Special acknowledgments are due to Sandy Sladen and Judith Nelson at the Children’s Bureau of Southern California and to researchers Jacquelyn McCroskey and William Meezan at U. of Southern California. Special thanks also are due to numerous local IFPS providers in North Carolina for participating in the ongoing development and field testing of the NCFAS. Domain specifications for the original NCFAS were based on the work of Meezan and McCroskey. Domains and subscales for Version 2.0 are based upon reliability and validity testing completed in the Fall of 1997.

    10. Learning Clear Strength Mild Baseline Adequate Mild Moderate P. Serious Problem

    Environment S. P.

     +2 +1 0 -1 -2 -3

     Refers to caretakers’ Refers to caretakers’ Refers to caretakers’ lack of

    enthusiam in teaching occasionally planning time attention or hindrance to

    children. Family has for learning activities. developmental tasks of

    routine for play and Caretakers do not actively children, and low involvement

    study. Time is seek out constant with children’s school.

    planned for reading, involvement with child’s Caretakers do not value

    attending outings, school, but make time education, and are frustrated

    structured activities. available as requested. and angered with children’s

    Caretakers’ actively learning needs. No

    involved with school, opportunities for learning at

    and assist children home. Games and toys absent,

    with developmental and/or are not age appropriate.

    tasks. Age appropriate Parents are not supportive of

    games and toys are school personnel, or are

    provided, and evident disdainful of public

    in the home (e.g. schools/teachers.

    school work is

    displayed). Parents

    are supportive of

    school personnel.

    5 NCFAS: North Carolina Family Assessment Scale, Version 2.0, Kirk, R. S., and Reed Ashcraft, K, 06/98 This instrument is derived from previous versions based on the Family Assessment Form, developed at the Children’s Bureau of Southern California, Michigan’s Family Assessment of Needs Form, and four assessment instruments developed in North Carolina by Haven House (Raleigh), Home Remedies (Morganton), Methodist Home for Children (Raleigh), and the state Division of Mental Health, Developmental Disabilities and Substance Abuse Services. Special acknowledgments are due to Sandy Sladen and Judith Nelson at the Children’s Bureau of Southern California and to researchers Jacquelyn McCroskey and William Meezan at U. of Southern California. Special thanks also are due to numerous local IFPS providers in North Carolina for participating in the ongoing development and field testing of the NCFAS. Domain specifications for the original NCFAS were based on the work of Meezan and McCroskey. Domains and subscales for Version 2.0 are based upon reliability and validity testing completed in the Fall of 1997.

    B. Parental Capabilities*

    Note: This section refers to biological parent(s) if present, or current caregiver(s)

1.Overall Clear Strength Mild Baseline Adequate Mild Moderate P. Serious Problem

    Parental S. P.

    Capabilities

     +2 +1 0 -1 -2 -3

     Refers to family Refers to family Refers to family receiving very

    receiving very high experiencing some low ratings in the following

    ratings in the following problems in the following areas: supervision of children,

    areas: supervision of areas: supervision of disciplinary practices, provision

    children, disciplinary children, disciplinary of develop./enrichment

    practices, provision of practices, provision of opportunities,

    develop./enrichment develop./enrichment parent(s)’/caregiver(s’) mental

    opportunities, opportunities, health, parent(s’)/caregiver(s’)

    parent(s)’/caregiver(s’) parent(s)’/caregiver(s’) physical health, and

    mental health, mental health, parent(s’)/caregiver(s’) use of

    parent(s’)/caregiver(s’) parent(s’)/caregiver(s’) drugs/alcohol.

    physical health, and physical health, and

    parent(s’)/caregiver(s’) parent(s’)/caregiver(s’)

    use of drugs/alcohol. use of drugs/alcohol.

    However, problems do

    not pose major difficulties

    for family members.

2. Supervision Clear Strength Mild Baseline/Adequate Mild Moderate P. Serious Problem

    of Children S. P.

     +2 +1 0 -1 -2 -3

     Refers to caretakers’ Refers to caretaker Refers to caretakers’ lack of

    provision of age providing satisfactory age appropriate supervision, or

    appropriate supervision of children. any supervision. Limits on

    supervision, such as Some limits are set on activities of children are not set

    setting limits for activities based on the or set inconsistently. Little or

    activities based on child’s age. Some no consideration given to

    the child’s age. consideration given to selecting substitute caregivers

    Caretaker is careful selecting substitute (strangers, known abusers,

    and attentive to caregivers, and some persons under the influence of

    child’s needs in concern with children’s drugs, alcohol). No thought

    selecting substitute comfort w/ the substitute about children’s comfort and

    caregivers (baby-caregiver. Has a basic feeling of security w/ substitute

    sitter, neighbor). knowledge of location of caregiver. Childrens’ friends

    Makes sure children children, and has a basic are not known, and location of

    feel comfortable and knowledge of children’s children is not regularly known.

    safe w/ substitute friends.

    caregiver, Keeps

    track of children and

    knows childrens’

    friends.

    6 NCFAS: North Carolina Family Assessment Scale, Version 2.0, Kirk, R. S., and Reed Ashcraft, K, 06/98 This instrument is derived from previous versions based on the Family Assessment Form, developed at the Children’s Bureau of Southern California, Michigan’s Family Assessment of Needs Form, and four assessment instruments developed in North Carolina by Haven House (Raleigh), Home Remedies (Morganton), Methodist Home for Children (Raleigh), and the state Division of Mental Health, Developmental Disabilities and Substance Abuse Services. Special acknowledgments are due to Sandy Sladen and Judith Nelson at the Children’s Bureau of Southern California and to researchers Jacquelyn McCroskey and William Meezan at U. of Southern California. Special thanks also are due to numerous local IFPS providers in North Carolina for participating in the ongoing development and field testing of the NCFAS. Domain specifications for the original NCFAS were based on the work of Meezan and McCroskey. Domains and subscales for Version 2.0 are based upon reliability and validity testing completed in the Fall of 1997.

3. Disciplinary Clear Strength Mild Baseline/Adequate Mild Moderate P. Serious Problem

    Practices S. P.

     +2 +1 0 -1 -2 -3

     Refers to caretakers’ Refers to caretakers’ Refers to caretakers’ lack of

    ability to provide adequate provision of discipline, or past or current

    age-appropriate, non-discipline and guidance of emotional or physical abuse

    punitive, consistent children. Occasionally referred to as discipline.

    discipline. Uses discipline is inappropriate Discipline is excessive,

    positive to age, too harsh or too punitive, inappropriate to age,

    reinforcement, and lenient, but inconsistencies inconsistent, and/or absent.

    tries to educate do not create major Present poor role models.

    children through problems between child Parents disagree on parenting

    appropriate and caretakers. strategies and present mixed

    discipline. Presents messages to child.

    good role model.

    Caretakers agree on

    parenting style and

    support one another.

4.. Provision of Clear Strength Mild Baseline/Adequate Mild Moderate P. Serious Problem

    Developmental/S. P.

    Enrichment

    Opportunities

     +2 +1 0 -1 -2 -3

     Refers to Refers to caregivers(s)’ Refers to caregiver(s)’ lack of

    caregiver(s)’ support of opportunities support or over-involvment in

    encouragement of for children such as sports, opportunities for children such

    opportunities such music lessons, &/or field as sports, music lessons, &/or

    as sports, music trips., but caregivers are field trips. Caregivers do not

    lessons, &/or visits not actively involved or encourage or discourage

    to museums & are involved sporadically childrens’ involvement in these

    parks. Caregivers in supporting these activities. Conversely,

    do not “push” activities. caregivers “push” children to

    children to be not only be involved but excel

    involved. in activities, and are demanding

    Caregivers are regarding their childrens’

    actively involved progress.

    providing

    transportation,

    coaching teams,

    and/or participating

    in advisory boards.

    7 NCFAS: North Carolina Family Assessment Scale, Version 2.0, Kirk, R. S., and Reed Ashcraft, K, 06/98 This instrument is derived from previous versions based on the Family Assessment Form, developed at the Children’s Bureau of Southern California, Michigan’s Family Assessment of Needs Form, and four assessment instruments developed in North Carolina by Haven House (Raleigh), Home Remedies (Morganton), Methodist Home for Children (Raleigh), and the state Division of Mental Health, Developmental Disabilities and Substance Abuse Services. Special acknowledgments are due to Sandy Sladen and Judith Nelson at the Children’s Bureau of Southern California and to researchers Jacquelyn McCroskey and William Meezan at U. of Southern California. Special thanks also are due to numerous local IFPS providers in North Carolina for participating in the ongoing development and field testing of the NCFAS. Domain specifications for the original NCFAS were based on the work of Meezan and McCroskey. Domains and subscales for Version 2.0 are based upon reliability and validity testing completed in the Fall of 1997.

5. Parent(s’)/ Clear Strength Mild Baseline/Adequate Mild Moderate P. Serious Problem

    caregiver(s’) S. P.

    mental health

     +2 +1 0 -1 -2 -3

     Refers to caregivers Refers to caregivers’ Refers to caregivers’ current

    current (e.g., positive current or past mental and/or past mental health

    self esteem) mental health (e.g., mild problems (e.g., severe

    health which positively depression) which depression, bipolar disorder,

    affects ability to parent occasionally inhibits active psychosis, etc.) that

    and/or successful caretaker, but does not negatively affect ability to

    resolution of past m. significantly hinder the parent children. Caretaker

    health problems (e.g. caretaker’s ability to projects personal problems on

    using success from parent children or other household

    overcoming issues to members

    bolster parenting).

6.Parent(s’)/ Clear Strength Mild Baseline/Adequate Mild Moderate P. Serious Problem

    Caregiver(s) S. P.

    Physical

    Health

     +2 +1 0 -1 -2 -3

     Refers to caregivers’ Refers to caregivers’ Refers to caregivers’ current or past

    current (e.g., current or past medical or medical or health history which are

    caregivers’ exercise health history which not under control and greatly

    regimin, etc.) or past provides some limits (e.g., impare ability to parent. (Issues

    medical or health overweight caregiver), but can range from severe asthma,

    history that positively does not pose major diabetes, blindness, heart problems,

    affects ability to parent obstacles in parenting high blood pressure, cancer, etc.)

    children. abilities.

    8 NCFAS: North Carolina Family Assessment Scale, Version 2.0, Kirk, R. S., and Reed Ashcraft, K, 06/98 This instrument is derived from previous versions based on the Family Assessment Form, developed at the Children’s Bureau of Southern California, Michigan’s Family Assessment of Needs Form, and four assessment instruments developed in North Carolina by Haven House (Raleigh), Home Remedies (Morganton), Methodist Home for Children (Raleigh), and the state Division of Mental Health, Developmental Disabilities and Substance Abuse Services. Special acknowledgments are due to Sandy Sladen and Judith Nelson at the Children’s Bureau of Southern California and to researchers Jacquelyn McCroskey and William Meezan at U. of Southern California. Special thanks also are due to numerous local IFPS providers in North Carolina for participating in the ongoing development and field testing of the NCFAS. Domain specifications for the original NCFAS were based on the work of Meezan and McCroskey. Domains and subscales for Version 2.0 are based upon reliability and validity testing completed in the Fall of 1997.

7. Parent(s’)/ Clear Strength Mild Baseline/Adequate Mild Moderate P. Serious Problem

    caregiver(s’) S. P.

    Use of Drugs/

    Alcohol

     +2 +1 0 -1 -2 -3

     Refers to caregivers’ Refers to caregivers’ Refers to caregivers’ current

    current or past use of current or past use of and/or past alcohol/substance

    drugs/alcohol. drugs/alcohol; mostly abuse problems that negatively

    Caregiver does not use uses alcohol affect ability to parent children.

    drugs/alcohol, or uses appropriately. Use of Caregivers’ are frequently

    alcohol appropriately. drugs/alcohol does not unable to care for or supervise

    Caregiver does not use significantly hinder the children due to use of

    illegal drugs, and caregivers’ ability to drugs/alcohol. Caregiver

    actively discourages supervise or parent projects personal problems on

    childrens’ use of children. children or other household

    drugs/alcohol. members.

    Caregivers’ moderate

    or non-use does not

    impair ability to

    parent.

    9 NCFAS: North Carolina Family Assessment Scale, Version 2.0, Kirk, R. S., and Reed Ashcraft, K, 06/98 This instrument is derived from previous versions based on the Family Assessment Form, developed at the Children’s Bureau of Southern California, Michigan’s Family Assessment of Needs Form, and four assessment instruments developed in North Carolina by Haven House (Raleigh), Home Remedies (Morganton), Methodist Home for Children (Raleigh), and the state Division of Mental Health, Developmental Disabilities and Substance Abuse Services. Special acknowledgments are due to Sandy Sladen and Judith Nelson at the Children’s Bureau of Southern California and to researchers Jacquelyn McCroskey and William Meezan at U. of Southern California. Special thanks also are due to numerous local IFPS providers in North Carolina for participating in the ongoing development and field testing of the NCFAS. Domain specifications for the original NCFAS were based on the work of Meezan and McCroskey. Domains and subscales for Version 2.0 are based upon reliability and validity testing completed in the Fall of 1997.

    C. Family Interactions

    Note: This section refers to family members living in the same or different households; an overall assessment

1.Overall Clear Strength Mild Baseline Adequate Mild Moderate P. Serious Problem

    Family S. P.

    Interactions

     +2 +1 0 -1 -2 -3

     Refers to family Refers to family receiving Refers to family receiving very

    receiving very high ratings of adequate in the low ratings in the following

    ratings in the following following areas: bonding areas: bonding w/ child,

    areas: bonding w/ w/ child, communication communication w/ child,

    child, commun. w/ w/ child, marital marital relationship,

    child, marital relationship, expectations expectations of the child, and

    relationship, expectat. of the child, and mutual mutual support.

    of the child, & mutual support.

    support.

2. Bonding Clear Strength Mild Baseline/Adequate Mild Moderate P. Serious Problem

    w/ Child S. P.

     +2 +1 0 -1 -2 -3

     Refers to caregivers’ Refers to caregivers’ Refers to caregivers’ inability

    healthy closeness with ability to be close to their to form a close relationship

    their child, and their child. Caregivers do not with their child, and inability to

    ability to nurture a openly encourage nurture their child. Caretakers

    child. Caretakers independence for their are resentful, rejecting, or

    encourage approp. child, and may not give detached from their child. Also

    independ. for child, & affection openly to child. refers to caregivers’

    give love and attention However, child’s needs nonresponsiveness,

    freely to child. They appear to be met. inappropriate responsiveness,

    respond to child’s needs or extreme enmeshment with

    appropriately, and have their child.

    a sense of attachment to

    child.

    10 NCFAS: North Carolina Family Assessment Scale, Version 2.0, Kirk, R. S., and Reed Ashcraft, K, 06/98 This instrument is derived from previous versions based on the Family Assessment Form, developed at the Children’s Bureau of Southern California, Michigan’s Family Assessment of Needs Form, and four assessment instruments developed in North Carolina by Haven House (Raleigh), Home Remedies (Morganton), Methodist Home for Children (Raleigh), and the state Division of Mental Health, Developmental Disabilities and Substance Abuse Services. Special acknowledgments are due to Sandy Sladen and Judith Nelson at the Children’s Bureau of Southern California and to researchers Jacquelyn McCroskey and William Meezan at U. of Southern California. Special thanks also are due to numerous local IFPS providers in North Carolina for participating in the ongoing development and field testing of the NCFAS. Domain specifications for the original NCFAS were based on the work of Meezan and McCroskey. Domains and subscales for Version 2.0 are based upon reliability and validity testing completed in the Fall of 1997.

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