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PLAN1 122401November 8, 2001

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PLAN1 122401November 8, 2001

    Cover

    Emergency Health Information: Savvy Health Care Consumer Series

    Emergency Health Information: Savvy Health Care Consumer Series Page 1 of 18 ? 2002: June Isaacson Kailes, Disability Policy Consultant, Playa del Rey, California http://www.jik.com and The Center for Disability Issues and the Health Profession, Western University of Health Sciences, Pomona,

    California, http://www.cdihp.org.

Inside cover

    Emergency Health Information:

    Savvy Health Care Consumer Series

    By June Isaacson Kailes, Disability Policy Consultant

    ? June Isaacson Kailes, Disability Policy Consultant, Playa del Rey, California and The Center for Disability

    Issues and the Health Profession, Western University of Health Sciences, Pomona, California

    http://www.cdihp.org

     Permission is granted to copy and distribute this material provided that:

    (1) Proper copyright notice and citation is attached to each copy;

    (2) No alterations are made to the contents of the document;

    (3) The document is not sold for profit; and

    (4) The Center for Disability Issues and the Health Professions is notified of such use.

     Please contact the center by fax (909) 469-5503 or e-mail at evac@westernu.edu.

    Required citation: Kailes, June Isaacson. Emergency Health Information: Savvy Health Care Consumer

    Series, 2004. Published and distributed by Center for Disability Issues and the Health Profession, Western

    University of Health Sciences, 309 E. Second Street, Pomona, CA 91766-1854, Phone: (909) 469-5380, TTY

    (909) 469-5520, Fax: (909) 469-5407, www.cdihp.org, Email: jik@pacbell.net

    This material is also available at http://www.cdihp.org, or for a hard copy, send a check payable to:

    CDIHP for $15.00 (includes shipping, handling and applicable tax) to the address above.

    Call CDIHP for pricing on bulk or international orders.

ISBN # 0-9726450-5-5

Emergency Health Information: Savvy Health Care Consumer Series Page 2 of 18

    ? 2002: June Isaacson Kailes, Disability Policy Consultant, Playa del Rey, California http://www.jik.com and

    The Center for Disability Issues and the Health Profession, Western University of Health Sciences, Pomona,

    California, http://www.cdihp.org.

     This document is the first to be published in a series of “Savvy Health Care Consumer Series

    excepted with permission from Be a Savvy Health Care Consumer, Your Life May Depend on It!, TH 5 Edition, Kailes Publications, http://www.jik.com/resource.html. 2003. Future guides planned for publication include:

    ? Visit Strategies

    ? Maintaining Your Medical Records And Health Information

    ? Be Informed

These guides offer practical and easy-to-use tools and information to help you work on taking

    charge of or remaining in charge of your health care. This series encourages you to take greater

    responsibility for your own health, wellness and health services. Savvy health care consumerism

    means knowing how to work effectively with the health care system and successfully advocating for

    your needs as well as the needs of family members and significant others.

Medicine is at best an imprecise art. That's why it’s important to be active and knowledgeable in the process of

    seeking and receiving health care. While having confidence in providers is important, the “provider always

    knows best" belief can be harmful.

Today’s health care environment is undergoing massive and rapid change that has far-reaching

    effects on all consumers. As you experience a leaner, meaner and less flexible health care system,

    it is more important then ever before that you sharpen your self-advocacy skills. People are finding

    they must learn how to be effective advocates or they may have to do without essential care. Being

    passive can be dangerous to your health.

This information may seem overwhelming at first and preparation can seem like a lot of work. It is,

    and taking charge does take time and effort. Do a little at a time. The important thing is to start.

    This information can be used and mastered in small pieces. The more you do the more confidant you

    will be. The payoff for using this information may save your life.

These guides are for you if:

? You use health care providers.

    ? You want to take charge of your health care.

    ? You live with a disability or a variety of health-related conditions, and are interested in

    using a number of disability-specific strategies and examples integrated throughout

    its pages.

    ? You advocate with and/or for someone else.

Emergency Health Information: Savvy Health Care Consumer Series Page 3 of 18

    ? 2002: June Isaacson Kailes, Disability Policy Consultant, Playa del Rey, California http://www.jik.com and

    The Center for Disability Issues and the Health Profession, Western University of Health Sciences, Pomona,

    California, http://www.cdihp.org.

June Isaacson Kailes, Disability Policy Consultant and Associate Director

    Center for Disability Issues and the Health Professions

    Western University of Health Sciences, Pomona, California

    Note to reader: The term “provider” is used throughout this guide to reflect a broad group

    of people who provide health services. Providers include, but are not limited to, physicians.

    Providers also include technicians and therapists as well as an array of professionals who are

    specialists in complimentary or alternative approaches to medical practices. Being a savvy

    health care consumer means employing the skills and strategies discussed in this guide with

    a variety of these health care providers.

    Emergency Health Information: Savvy Health Care Consumer Series Page 4 of 18

    ? 2002: June Isaacson Kailes, Disability Policy Consultant, Playa del Rey, California http://www.jik.com and

    The Center for Disability Issues and the Health Profession, Western University of Health Sciences, Pomona,

    California, http://www.cdihp.org.

     Emergency Health Information

It is good practice to carry on you at all times emergency health information containing your critical health

    information and emergency contacts. An alternative would be to wear a Medic Alert tag or bracelet (see

    Resources). These bracelets can be engraved with the type of disability or any medical condition of

    importance. An 800 number keeps your current medication, diagnosis, etc., on file. You can order these

    from your local pharmacy.

Emergency health information communicates to emergency and rescue personnel what they need to know

    about you if they find you unconscious, confused, in shock, or just unable to provide information. Make

    multiple copies of this information to keep in your: emergency supply kits, car, work space, wallet (fold and

    place behind driver’s license or official identification card), wheelchair pack, etc. (Kailes 1996)

Why You Should Carry Emergency Health Information

The care you receive in emergency situations depends on how much information doctors and other

    emergency personnel have at the time of the emergency. In emergency rooms you may be unable to give a

    full medical history and may not have someone with you to provide it. (Lollar 1994) p. 72-73 Sometimes

    emergency personnel only have seconds to make decisions about your care.

Review and update this information whenever your medications or other information changes, but no less

    than twice a year.

Tips on Completing Emergency Health Information

When completing your emergency health information (forms included at back of this guide) be sure and

    include:

    ? Disability/Conditions emergency personnel might need to know about (if you are not sure, list it):

Examples:

    ? Epilepsy, heart condition, high blood pressure, respiratory problem, HIV positive.

    ? My disability, due to a head injury, sometimes makes me appear confused or drunk. I have a

    psychiatric disability. In an emergency, I may become confused or overwhelmed. Help me find a

    quiet corner and I should be fine in about 10 minutes. If this does not happen, give me one pill (name

    of medication) located in my (purse, wallet, pocket, etc.).

    ? I have diabetes. If I lose consciousness or my behavior appears peculiar, I may be having a reaction

    associated with my diabetes. If I can swallow, give me sugar in some form such as candy, syrup,

    cola or a beverage that contains sugar like orange juice. If my breath smells fruity, don't give me

    anything to eat and make sure I get medical help.Emergency Health Information: Savvy Health Care Consumer Series Page 5 of 18

    ? 2002: June Isaacson Kailes, Disability Policy Consultant, Playa del Rey, California http://www.jik.com and

    The Center for Disability Issues and the Health Profession, Western University of Health Sciences, Pomona,

    California, http://www.cdihp.org.

    ? Multiple Chemical sensitivities: I react to......., my reaction is......., do this......... (these conditions may

    not be commonly understood by emergency personnel and therefore explanations should be

    detailed and specific).

    Medications: If you take medication that cannot be interrupted without serious consequences, make sure this is stated clearly and include:

? Prescriptions,

    ? Dosage,

    ? Times taken,

    ? When first prescribed and how long you have been on the drug,

    ? Other details regarding specifications of administration/regimen, i.e., insulin

     Example: ? I take Lithium and my blood level needs to be checked every______.

    Allergies (sensitivities):

? Penicillin or other antibiotics

    ? Adhesive tape

    ? Morphine, Codeine, Demerol or other narcotics

    ? Latex

    ? Novocain or other anesthetics

    ? Iodine or Methiolate

    ? Aspirin, Emperin or other pain remedies

    ? Sun exposure

    ? Detergents, fabric softeners

    ? Sulfa drugs

    ?Tetanus, antitoxin or other serums

    ?Pesticides

    ?Eggs, milk, chocolate or other foods

    ?Insect bites, bee stings

    ?Environmental sensitivities

    ?Other:

Examples:

? Diesel exhaust can kill me. Do not put me in or near idling emergency vehicles.

    ? I can speak when provided with clean air and low electromagnetic fields. Take me to fresh air and turn off

    electrical equipment.

Immunization (shots) and Dates examples:

    ? Flu,

    ? Pneumonia/ Pneumococcal,

    ? Tetanus/diphtheria, Emergency Health Information: Savvy Health Care Consumer Series Page 6 of 18

    ? Polio (IPV or OPV),

    ? 2002: June Isaacson Kailes, Disability Policy Consultant, Playa del Rey, California http://www.jik.com

    and The Center for Disability Issues and the Health Profession, Western University of Health Sciences,

    Pomona, California, http://www.cdihp.org.

    ? Measles-mumps-rubella (MMR),

    ? H. influenzae type b (HIB),

    ? (Chicken Pox) Vericella,

    ? Hepatitis A,

    ? Hepatitis B,

    ? Rubella 9.

    Communication/Devices/Equipment/Other ?With a communication or speech-related disability, list specific communication needs: Communication (or a speech-related disability) examples: ? I speak using an artificial larynx, if it is not available, I can write notes to communicate.

    ? If (under stress after seizure), I may not make sense for a while. Leave me alone for 10-15 minutes, my

    mind should clear.

    ? I speak slowly, softly and my speech is not clear. Find a quiet place for us to communicate. Be patient! Ask

    me to repeat or spell out what I am saying if you do not understand me!

    ? I use a (word board, augmentative communication device, etc.) to communicate. In an emergency, I can

    point to words and letters.

    ? I cannot read. I communicate using an augmentative communication device. I can point to simple pictures

    on a sheet which you will find in my wallet or emergency supply kit.

    ? I may have difficulty understanding what you are telling me, please speak slowly and use simple language.

    ? My primary language is ASL (American Sign Language). I am deaf, not fluent in English, I will need an ASL

    interpreter. I read only very simple English. Try using gestures.

    ? I am hard of hearing. Get my attention before speaking to me. Look at me when you speak so I can

    speechread.

Equipment examples:

? Motorized wheelchair

    ? Suction machine

    ? Home dialysis

    ? Respirator

    ? Cochlear implant

    ? Indwelling catheter

Other examples:

    ? I need specific help with: walking, eating, standing, dressing, transferring, etc.

? I need assistance with walking. The best way to assist is to allow me to hang onto your arm for balance. Emergency Evacuation Preparedness: Taking Responsibility For Your Own Safety

     Page 7 of 18

    ? 2002: June Isaacson Kailes, Disability Policy Consultant, Playa del Rey, California http://www.jik.com and The

    Center for Disability Issues and the Health Profession, Western University of Health Sciences, Pomona, California, http://www.cdihp.org.

? I am blind, please tell me what you are doing before doing it. I read Braille and I need paper work read to

    me.

? I have a panic condition. If I panic and appear very anxious, speak to me calmly and slowly. Be patient.

    Ask me if I need my medication and I will direct you. You may need to ask me more than once. Please

    stay with me until I calm down.

? I use a respirator full time, but I can breathe without it for up to 15 minutes.

Resources

MedicAlert - http://www.medicalert.org

References

Kailes, J. (1996). Living and Lasting on Shaky Ground: An Earthquake Preparedness Guide for People with

    Disabilities, Governor’s Office of Emergency Services, P.O. Box 419047, Rancho Cordova, CA 95741-9047, http://www.oes.ca.gov (earthquakes->resources).

    Lollar, D., ed. (1994). A Preventing Secondary Conditions Associated with Spina Bifida or Cerebral Palsy: Proceedings and Recommendations of a Symposium, Spina Bifida Association of America, 4590 MacArthur Blvd., N.W., Suite 250, Washington, DC 20007-4226.

     Emergency Evacuation Preparedness: Taking Responsibility For Your Own Safety Page 8 of 18 ? 2002: June Isaacson Kailes, Disability Policy Consultant, Playa del Rey, California http://www.jik.com and The Center for Disability Issues and the Health Profession, Western University of Health Sciences, Pomona,

    California, http://www.cdihp.org.

Sample Emergency Health Information

     Date:6/20/02 Updated: 10/1/02 Emergency Health

    Information

    Name Jane Ready

    Address 11 Prepared Place

    City Savvy State CA Zip 90001

    HOME WORK CONTACT METHOD

    310-555-9999 909-555-6666 Phone:

    Cell: 310-555-9998

    Pager: 888 -555-6666 Fax: 310-555-9996 909-555-6668 E-mail: Jr@beready.org Healthcall@one-of-a-kind.com Birth Date 7/7/77 Blood Type B+ Social Security No. 555-55-5555

    Health Plan: Blue Cross Individual #: 010101-09009 Group #: 010203-00006 Emergency Contact: Husband Bob

    Address Same as above

    City State Zip CONTACT METHOD HOME WORK

    Same as above 818-777-5555 Phone:

    Cell: 310-555-9993

    Pager 888 555 - 6667 Fax: Same as above 818-777-5553 E-mail: b.r@beready.org Bob.ready@safety.com Primary Care Provider: Henrietta Housecall,

Address 12th Primary Care Place

    State California Zip 90001 City Healthville

    E-mail HH@telecompetent.net Phone 310-555-2345 Fax 310-555-2346

    Disability / Conditions: Cerebral palsy, Diabetes, Low vision, Epilepsy Medication: Dilantin 300 mg, Lantus insulin

    Allergies: penicillin; sensitive to antibiotic “e-mycin” (stomach upset, headache, diarrhea)

    Immunizations Dates

     Page 9 of 18 Emergency Evacuation Preparedness: Taking Responsibility For Your Own Safety

    ? 2002: June Isaacson Kailes, Disability Policy Consultant, Playa del Rey, California http://www.jik.com and The Center for Disability Issues and the Health Profession, Western University of Health Sciences, Pomona,

    California, http://www.cdihp.org.

Tetanus/Diphtheria, 5/5/95

    Inact. Havrix 5/5 with booster, 5/5/95, 11/95

    Polio virus 5/5/95,

    Communication / Devices / Equipment / Other:

    Motorized scooter, I need assistance with walking. The best way to assist is to allow me to hang onto

    your arm for balance. I speak slowly, softly and my speech is not clear. Find a quiet place for us to

    communicate. Be patient! Ask me to repeat or spell out what I am saying if you cannot understand me.

     Emergency Evacuation Preparedness: Taking Responsibility For Your Own Safety

     Page 10 of 18 ? 2002: June Isaacson Kailes, Disability Policy Consultant, Playa del Rey, California http://www.jik.com and The Center for Disability Issues and the Health Profession, Western University of Health Sciences, Pomona,

    California, http://www.cdihp.org.

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