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8-Inch Floppy Disk

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8-Inch Floppy Disk

8-Inch Floppy Disk

Media Type: floppy disk

Date Introduced: 1971 by IBM, Alan Shugart

Dates in Use: Late 1971 1981

Physical Dimensions: 8” x 8”, with 1 5/16” hole in centre

Storage Capacities: 100KB 1+MB

Media Variations and/or Identifying Features: Originally designed to load microcode and

    diagnostics into large IBM mainframe computer systems, 8-inch diskettes became widely

    accepted as a data-storage medium. The first commercial 8-inch diskettes could only

    record on one side with storage capacities of less than 100 KB. In 1973, drives that could

    read up to 250 KB were introduced.

Common Manufacturers: IBM

Sources:

    Computer History Museum “Computer History Timeline”

    http://www.computerhistory.org/timeline/ [accessed Oct. 23, 2007]

Digital Preservation Management: Implementing Short-Term Strategies for Long-Term

    Problems. “Chamber of Horrors: Obsolete and Endangered Media”

    http://www.library.cornell.edu/iris/tutorial/dpm/oldmedia/disks.html [accessed Oct. 23,

    2007].

Accurite. “Floppy Disk Drive Primer” http://www.accurite.com/FloppyPrimer.html

    [accessed Oct. 23, 2007].

Miwa Yokoyama

    Handling New Media Fall 2006

    Assignment #2

DIGITAL STORAGE MEDIA

    Media Format: 3-1/2 inch floppy disk, double-sided, double-density (DSDD)

Media Type: Disk

Date Introduced: 1986 by Apple

Dates in Use: 1986 - now (fading out)

Dimensions: 90mm x 94mm -- slightly longer than it is wide

Capacity: 720 kb (PC), 800 kB (Mac) for the DSDD type of disk

    Media Variations and/or Identifying Features: spring-loaded metal cover, rigid plastic shell, diff. from DSHD (which has more capacity), write-protect mechanism

    Common Manufacturers/Brands: Sony, Imation, IBM, 3M, and many other brands

    Associated Hardware: 3.5" floppy disk drive (sometimes built in to PCs and older MACs)

    Associated Software: OS (usually Windows/Mac to format disk), no software required.

    Primary Usage: storage of files, transfer of data, back-up, software and driver installation (use recommended for short-term data storage only.)

    Risks: shutter mechanism problem, catching inside the drive, getting stuck, and if mishandled, disk can break. Obsolescence is the main concern and risk right now, as the associated hardware is being phased out of being built-in to personal computers.

Condition Assessment: Will become obsolete in the near future.

    Conservation Issues: Obsolescence of hardware - Most manufacturers have stopped making computers with 3 1/2" floppy drives built-in. Migrate data immediately and save the working media and hardware, if possible.

Sources:

    Accurite. "Floppy Disk Drive Primer."

    Entlich, Richard. "One Last Spin: Floppy Disks Head Toward Retirement."

    UK National Archives. "Care, Handling, and Storage of Removable Media."

Wikipedia. "Floppy disk."

Tanisha Jones

    October 7, 2004

    Handling Mew Media

    Instructor: Mona Jimenez

DIGITAL STORAGE MEDIA

Media Format: Zip disk

Media Type: (Disk, tape or solid state): Disk

Date Introduced: (year) 1

    990, Syquest introduced the 40 MB 5.25"

    removable hard disk cartridge; by 1992 Syquest upgraded the disks to 44MB and 88MB 5.25"; in spring 1993 Syquest introduced the 3.5" disk at 105MB.

Dates in Use: (years): 1990 - present

Dimensions: 3.88" x 3.92" (9.7 cm x 9.8 cm)

Capacity: currently Iomega offers 100, 250, 750 megabytes

    Media Variations and/or Identifying Features: Iomega REV 35GB disk

Common Manufacturers/Brands: Iomega, Maxell, Fuji, Verbatim

    Associated Hardware: (playback): Iomega Zip100 MB, 250 MB, 750 MB drives

    Associated Software: Iomega Active Disk (software application that allows user to run the disks anywhere the disk is being used).

    Primary Usage: Zip disks allow you to back up, transfer, secure and archive computer data. Enables user to transport large files and is portable. Can remove disk cartridge from drive and store in a secure place. Can also place a security password (password protection) on disk.

    Risks: As disk sizes increase, zip drives that hold smaller formats will not read larger sized zip disks. There is a loss of compatibility. There are also issues regarding the potential loss of technical support for older zip disks.

Condition Assessment: TBD

    Conservation Actions: Store disk properly in temperature controlled environments.

Resources:

Iomega website http://www.iomega.com/zip/

    Lu, Cary. "Removable-drive wars flare. (SyQuest Technology, Iomega Corp developing new products to compete)," Macworld, July 1996.

Loni Shibuyama

    Handling New Media

    Instructor: Mona Jimenez

    Fall 2006

Assignment #2

    DIGITAL STORAGE DEVICESJAZ

Device Name: Jaz Drives

Date Introduced: 1GB drive introduced in 1995; 2GB drive introduced in 1997

Dates in Use: 1995 to 2003 (Iomegaprimary manufacturer of Jaz storage

    mediadiscontinued production on Jaz drives but continues to provide support)

Dimensions: External drive-- 8.0" x 5.33" x 1.5"

Variations and/or Identifying Features: External drive that uses “hard disk”

    removable storage with 1GB or 2GB of memory; also comes as internal drive

    with removable storage; both external and internal drives originally used SCSI

    interface (adaptors for USB and Firewire have since been developed)

    Common Manufacturers/Brands: Iomega Corporation, APS Technologies, LaCie

    Associated Hardware: Iomega External and Internal Jaz Drives; APS Technologies' Jaz 2GB Pro; LaCie's 2 GB EKO External Jaz and 2GB d2

    External Jaz

Associated Software: IomegaWare, Jaz Tools, Jaz Jet

Associated Media: 1GB and 2GB Jaz disks

    Interface/Connectors: Originally a SCSI interface; in 1999, Iomega introduced USB adaptors and, later, Firewire connections (USB and Firewire both limited in

    operating system support)

    Primary Usage: Jaz’s portability and large capacity made it attractive for professionalsoften professionals because the price of Jaz limited use in the

    general public’s homes—to use it for creating, storing, cataloguing and sharing large files of graphic design, desktop publishing, multimedia, audio and video,

    among others.

Risk Assessment: An obsolete format, Iomega discontinued production on Jaz

    drives in 2003; external/removable drives tend to be more failure-prone than

    hard-drives; in 1996, the New York Times reported that Iomega estimates the

    Jaz disks’ shelf-life to be 10 years; Iomega Jaz drives do not have internal cooling fans/devices, and therefore, constant use exposes disk and drive to

    continually high temperatures; the infamous “click of death” as experienced by

    many Jaz users describes the audible clicking sound the Jaz drive makes before

    it “dies” suddenly, affecting the disks as well (the “click of death” has also

    sparked class-action lawsuits to Iomega).

Conservation Actions: Jaz drives and disks are not recommended for long-

    term storage and any content on them should be duplicated in multiple storage

    media such as hard-drives, servers and other removable media more appropriate

    for long-term storage.

    DIGITAL STORAGE MEDIAJAZ DISKS

Media Format: Jaz Disks

    Media Type: “rigid” disk/cartridge

Date Introduced: 1GB diskDecember 1995; 2 GB diskMarch 1998

Dates in Use: 1GB1995 to present; 2GB1997 to present [Iomega stopped

    production on new Jaz drives, but continues to sell Jaz disks and provide support]

Dimensions: 3.7 x 3.5 inches

Capacity: 1GB and 2 GB

Media Variations and/or Identifying Features: Removable storage disks with

    3.5” rigid magnetic media; comes in 1GB and 2GB disks with the 2GB Jaz drive

    being backwards compatible (the 1GB drives, however, cannot read 2GB disks)

    Common Manufacturers/Brands: Iomega

Associated Hardware: Iomega External and Internal Jaz Drives; APS

    Technologies' Jaz 2GB Pro; LaCie's 2 GB EKO External Jaz and 2GB d2

    External Jaz

Associated Software: IomegaWare, Jaz Tools

Primary Usage: Jaz’s portability and large capacity made it attractive for

professionalsoften professionals because the price of Jaz limited use in the

    general public’s homes—to use it for creating, storing, cataloguing and sharing large files of graphic design, desktop publishing, multimedia, audio and video,

    among others.

Risk Assessment: An obsolete format, Iomega discontinued production on Jaz

    drives in 2003; 1GB Jaz drives cannot read 2GB disks (2GB drives are backward

    compatible, however); external/removable drives tend to be more failure-prone

    than hard-drives; in 1996, the New York Times reported that Iomega estimates

    the Jaz disks’ shelf-life to be 10 years; Iomega Jaz drives do not have internal cooling fans/devices, and therefore, constant use exposes disk and drive to

    continually high temperatures; the infamous “click of death” as experienced by

    many Jaz users describes the audible clicking sound the Jaz drive makes before

    it “dies” suddenly, affecting the disks as well (the “click of death” has also

    sparked class-action lawsuits to Iomega).

Conservation Actions: Jaz drives and disks are not recommended for long-

    term storage and any content on them should be duplicated in multiple storage

    media such as hard-drives, servers and other removable media more appropriate

    for long-term storage.

Sources

    Macworld. San Francisco: Nov 1998. Vol.15, Iss. 11; pg. 63 accessed at

    <http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?index=11&did=34898809&SrchMode=1

    &sid=1&Fmt=4&VInst=PROD&VType=PQD&RQT=309&VName=PQD&T

    S=1161272301&clientId=9269>. PC Magazine; “Definition of: Jaz disk” accessed at

    <http://www.pcmag.com/encyclopedia_term/0,2542,t=Jaz+disk&i=45595,0

    0.asp>.

    Iomega Support & Downloads; Manuals and Specifications page accessed at

    <https://iomega-na-en.custhelp.com/cgi-

    bin/iomega_na_en.cfg/php/enduser/std_adp.php?p_faqid=14432#jaz>.

    MacInTouch Special Reports, Iomega Problems accessed at

    <http://www.macintouch.com/jazprobs.html>.

    Manes, Stephen. Jaz Drive: A Lot of Backup Insurance in a Small

    Package.” New York Times. (Late Edition (East Coast)). New York, N.Y.:

    Jul 9, 1996. pg. C.7, accessed at

    

    hMode=1&sid=3&Fmt=3&VInst=PROD&VType=PQD&RQT=309&VName

    =PQD&TS=1161415431&clientId=9269>.

    Gibson Research Corporation. “What is the Click of Death?” accessed at

    .

Quarter Inch Cartridge (QIC)

Media Type: Magnetic tape

Date Introduced: 1972 by 3M

Dates in Use: 1972 1995 (QIC DC600); 1990-1995 (G2000 tape); 1995 present

    (Travan cartridge)

Dimensions: 3.5-inch or 5.25-inch cartridges, with up to 1500 ft. of tape.

    Storage Capacities: 250 MB 50 GB

Media Variations and/ or Identifying Features: QIC is a linear format that was popular in

    the eighties and early nineties. They were available in the standard sizes, DC600 and

    DC2000, and were later replaced by QIC-Wide and Travan.

Common Manufacturers: Athana, Verbatim, Imation.

Associated Harrdware: Single-capstan drive units containing magnetic read/write heads

    and electronics for read/write, motion control, and system interface functions. These

    drives are packaged in both 3.5-inch and 5.25-inch form factors.

Sources:

Digital Preservation Management: Implementing Short-Term Strategies for Long-Term

    Problems. “Chamber of Horrors: Obsolete and Endangered Media”

    http://www.library.cornell.edu/iris/tutorial/dpm/oldmedia/tapes.html [accessed Oct. 23,

    2007].

QIC Tape Solutions. http://www.qic.org/. [Accessed 2 November 2007].

Digital Data Storage (DDS) tape

Media type: Magnetic tape

Date Introduced: 1989 by Sony and HP

Dates in Use: 1989 - present

Physical Dimensions: 7.3cm x 5.4 cm x 1.0cm cartridge, 4mm tape

Storage Capacities: 1.3 GB 80 GB

Media Variations and/or Identifying Features: DDS is a helical scan technology that uses

    the same 4mm metal particle tape as digital audio tape (DAT). Computer-grade DDS tape, however, must meet strict ANSI standards with a much lower Bit Error Rate than most

    DAT tape.

Common Manufacturers: Sony, Maxell, TDK, Fujifilm

Sources:

Avery, Lynne. “A Brief History of Tape.” Exabyte.

    www.exabyte.com/support/online/documentation/whitepapers/history.pdf [accessed 2 November 2007].

    DAT Manufacturers Group Website. http://www.datmgm.com/ [Accessed 2 November 2007].

Digital Preservation Management: Implementing Short-Term Strategies for Long-Term

    Problems. “Chamber of Horrors: Obsolete and Endangered Media”

    http://www.library.cornell.edu/iris/tutorial/dpm/oldmedia/tapes.html [accessed Oct. 23, 2007].

Digital Linear Tape (DLT)

Media Format: Magnetic Tape

Date Introduced: 1985 (as TK50) by Digital Equipment Corporation (DEC)

Dates in Use: late 1980s - present

    Dimensions: approx. 4”x4”x1” cartridge, with 1/2” linear tape

Storage capacity (native/compressed): 35/70 GB (DLT 7000); 40/80 GB (DLT

    8000); 110/200 GB (SuperDLT)

Media Variations and/or Identifying Features: Data is recorded linearly, forming

    multiple parallel tracks along tape. Developed for client/ server environments and

    network backup. Features low-tension linear recording path, multiple channel

    read/write system, high capacity, data integrity. Backwards compatible through

    generations of DLT tape products.

Common Manufacturers: Quantum, Fujifilm

Sources:

Campbell, Brad. “Digital storage device: DLT Drive” MIAP Student Work Archive.

    http://www.nyu.edu/tisch/preservation/program/student_work/index.shtml [accessed

    October 23, 2007].

Digital Preservation Management: Implementing Short-Term Strategies for Long-Term

    Problems. “Chamber of Horrors: Obsolete and Endangered Media”

    http://www.library.cornell.edu/iris/tutorial/dpm/oldmedia/tapes.html [accessed Oct. 23,

    2007].

Khurshdurov, Andrei. Essential Guide to Computer Data Storage: From Floppy to DVD.

    Prentice-Hall, 2001. Accessed online by subscription at

    http://safari.informit.com/0130927392/pref01

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