DOC

Accessibility-Transitioning to Windows 7

By Alvin Bell,2014-05-07 17:01
6 views 0
Accessibility-Transitioning to Windows 7

Accessibility: Transitioning to Windows 7

    Accessibility: Transitioning to Windows 7

    Many people find it difficult to move to a new operating system. They tend to grow comfortable

    with their current version, and often use the logic of "if it isn’t broken, why fix it" to resist moving to a new operating system. Those who use this logic with the Windows? 7 operating system,

    however, will miss out on the many compelling features that help make this version of Windows

    fast, easy to use, easy to customize, and very accessible.

    One of the main goals of the Windows 7 engineering teams was to make Windows 7 as accessible

    as possible for users with disabilities. At every phase of developmentthrough design, implementation, and testingeach team kept the needs of all users in mind, integrating accessible

    design principles into each feature of Windows 7.

    Transitioning to a new operating system is challenging. This article will help you with the transition

    by explaining how some of the most prominent features have changed from previous versions of

    Windows, including the Start menu, the taskbar, and Windows Explorer. It also describes the

    Windows Ribbon, a popular feature for presenting a program’s command structure. This article focuses on the structure and navigation model of these prominent features. The description of each

    feature includes links to more detailed information.

    This article does not describe every accessibility feature that has changed in Windows 7, nor does it

    explain how to use all of the accessibility features that were introduced in Windows 7. For

    information about the accessibility features introduced in Windows 7, see accessibility in Windows 7.

    Before you read this article you should understand the following terms:

    ? Focus The ability of a window, dialog box, button, or other user interface object to receive

    input from the keyboard and mouse. Only one user interface object at a time can have the

    focus.

    ? Navigation The act of moving the focus from one user interface object to another.

This article contains the following sections:

    ? Start Menu

    ? Taskbar

    ? Windows Explorer

    ? Windows Ribbon

    Start Menu

    The Windows 7 Start menu serves the same basic purpose as in previous versions of Windowsit

    provides the main gateway to the computer’s programs, folders, and settings. However, Windows 7

    adds a number of features that give you more control over the programs and files that appear on

    the Start menu, enabling you to organize and customize the Start menu to suit your preferences. Start Menu Structure

    The following sections briefly describe the main parts of the Start menu, including the search box, the right pane, the Shut down button, the left pane, and the All Programs button. You can use the TAB key to navigate from one main part to the next.

    ? 2010 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved. 1

Accessibility: Transitioning to Windows 7

    Left Pane

    The left pane shows a list of programs that you use frequently, along with any programs that you

    choose to "pin" to the Start menu. Pinning a program moves it into the upper part of the left pane

    where you can access it more easily, and where it will not be displaced by more frequently used

    programs.

    Programs listed in the left pane can have Jump Lists associated with them. A Jump List is a list of recently or frequently opened items, such as files, folders, tasks, or websites, organized by the

    program you use to open them. You can also pin your favorite items to a Jump List for easy access

    to programs and files that you use every day. If a program has a Jump List, the left pane will

    include an arrow to the right of the program’s Start menu item. Right Pane

    The right pane of the Start menu contains a list of buttons that take you to commonly used folders,

    settings, and features. The right pane is also where you go to access your libraries. Introduced in

    Windows 7, libraries help you organize and access files by type, regardless of where they are

    stored on the computer. A library gathers files from different locations and displays them as a

    single collection, without moving them from where they’re stored. Windows 7 has four default

    librariesDocuments, Music, Pictures, and Videosbut you can create new libraries for other collections. The Documents, Music, and Pictures libraries appear on the Start menu by default. You

    can add or remove libraries from the right pane, and you can customize their appearances.

    All Programs Button

    Below the left pane you’ll find the All Programs item. As in previous versions of Windows, you can use the All Programs item to access a complete list of all programs on your computer.

    Search Box

    The search box occupies the area below the left pane. You can use it to find files, folders, programs,

    and e-mail messages stored on your computer. When you start typing a word or phrase in the

    search box, the search begins automatically, and the search results temporarily fill the left and

    right panes. The search results are organized into groups, depending on what kind of item each

    result is and where it is located on your computer. The top search resultsbut not all resultsfor

    each group are displayed under a group heading. You can click an individual result to open that

    program or file, or you can click a group heading to see the complete list of search results for that

    group in Windows Explorer.

    Shut Down Button

    Below the right pane you’ll find the Shut down button that you use to close all open programs and turn off your computer. In Windows 7, you can choose to have this button perform a different

    action, such as putting your computer into sleep mode or letting a different user log on. An arrow

    button on the right side of the Shut down button gives you access to additional options, including Logoff, Restart, and Sleep.

    Other Changes

    To simplify the Start menu, and to focus on items that users care about most, some familiar

    buttons have been changed or removed in Windows 7. Here’s a summary of the changes:

    ? The Connect To button, which provided a list of available networks you could choose to

    connect to, has been removed. To see the list of available networks, select the Networking

    icon in the notification area of the taskbar.

    ? 2010 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved. 2

Accessibility: Transitioning to Windows 7

    ? The Printers button is now the Devices and Printers button. You can use this button to

    display a list of all peripheral devices connected to your computer, including printers, faxes,

    monitors, and your mouse.

    ? The Network button has been removed from the Start menu, but it appears in the navigation

    pane of Windows Explorer. You can use the Network button to display a list of all the

    computers connected to your current network.

    ? The Recent Items button has been removed from the Start menu, although the files and

    programs you have recently opened will still appear in the Jump List for the Start menu

    automatically. You can also add the Recent Items button back to the Start menu if you prefer. The classic Start menu option, which gave your Start menu the look and functionality of previous versions of Windows, is no longer available in Windows 7.

    Navigation Model for the Start Menu

    The Start menu has a two-level navigation model. The top level is visible and accessible when you

    first open the Start menu. It contains the left and right panes, the All Programs item, the search

    box, and the Shut down button.

    The second level of the navigation model is visible and accessible when you select All Programs,

    or type in the search box, or press the RIGHT ARROW key for a program item that has an

    associated Jump List. Entering the second level of the navigation model causes part of the Start

    menu to be replaced with new contents:

    ? Selecting All Programs replaces the contents of the left pane with a list of all programs on

    your computer.

    ? Typing in the search box causes the search results window to replace the left and right panes of

    the Start menu.

    ? Pressing the RIGHT ARROW key on an item that has a Jump List causes the Jump List to

    replace the right pane of the Start menu.

    Navigation Tips for the Start Menu

    You can use the Windows logo key or CTRL+ESC to open the Start menu. The Windows logo key is labeled with the following icon:

    When the Start menu opens, the search box has the focus (that is, it is ready to receive input from the keyboard). From there, you can navigate among the items in the Start menu by using the TAB key, SHIFT+TAB, and the arrow keys. At the top level, the TAB key navigates among the items as

    follows:

    1. search box

    2. first right pane item

    3. Shut down button

    4. First left pane item

    5. All Programs item

    Reverse navigation with SHIFT+TAB is similar, except that you go to the last item in the left and

    right panes instead of the first item. You can use the arrow keys to step through the items in the

    left and right panes, and to jump from one pane to another.

    ? 2010 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved. 3

Accessibility: Transitioning to Windows 7

    Navigating the second level of the Start menu is similar to navigating the top level, with the

    following exceptions:

    ? When the All Programs list is visible, the Back item replaces the All Programs item. When you

    select the Back item or press the ESC key, you return to the top level of the Start menu. ? When the search results window is visible, you can use the TAB key to navigate as follows:

    1. search results list

    2. Shut down button

    3. See more results item

    4. search box

    You can press the ESC key to remove the search results window and return to the top level of

    the Start menu.

    ? When a Jump List is visible, the TAB key navigates as follows:

    1. first right pane item

    2. first left pane item

    3. All Programs

    4. search box

    5. Shut down button

    You can press the ESC key or the LEFT ARROW key to remove the Jump List and return to the

    top level of the Start menu.

    You can use the following keys and key combinations get around in the Start menu. Key Action

    Windows logo key or Display or hide the Start menu.

    CTRL+ESC

    TAB Navigate forward through the main sections, including the search box,

    the left pane, the Shut down button, the right pane, and the All

    Programs item.

    SHIFT+TAB Navigate backward through the main sections. UP ARROW Navigate upward through list items.

    DOWN ARROW Navigate downward through list items.

    RIGHT ARROW If a left pane item has the focus, jump to the nearest right pane item.

    If a right pane item has the focus, jump to the nearest left pane item.

    If a left pane item with a Jump List has the focus, show the Jump List.

    If the All Programs item has the focus, show the All Programs list.

    If the Shut down button has the focus, show the shut down options

    menu.

    LEFT ARROW If a left pane item has the focus, jump to the nearest right pane item.

    If a right pane item has the focus, jump to the nearest left pane item.

    If a Jump List has the focus, hide the Jump List and set the focus to the

    associated program item.

    If the Back button in the All Programs list has the focus, close the All

    Programs list.

    If the Shut down button has the focus, jump to the search box. If the

    search box has the focus, jump to the Shut down button. ? 2010 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved. 4

Accessibility: Transitioning to Windows 7

    ESC If a top-level item has the focus, close the Start menu and set the

    focus to the Start button.

    If the search results window has the focus, hide the window and set

    the focus to the search box.

    If a Jump List has the focus, hide the Jump List and set the focus to the

    search box.

    If the shut down options menu has the focus, close the list and set the

    focus to the Shut down button.

See Also

    Customize the Start menu

    Find a file or folder

    The Start menu (overview)

    Using Jump Lists to open programs and items

    What’s new with the Start menu?

    Working with libraries

Taskbar

    The taskbar is a special toolbar that you use to start programs, switch among your open programs

    and windows, minimize and restore windows, and receive important alerts about certain programs

    and computer settings. You can dock the toolbar along any edge of the Windows desktop, and you

    can customize many aspects of the taskbar’s appearance and behavior through the Taskbar and

    Start Menu Properties dialog box.

    Taskbar Structure

    The main parts of the taskbar include the Start button, the taskband, deskbands (if present), the notification area, and the Show desktop button. These parts are briefly described in the following

    sections.

    Start Button

    The Start button appears at the left end of the taskbar (or at the top if you’ve docked the taskbar

    to a side of the desktop). You use the Start button to open the Start menu. For more information,

    see the Start Menu section earlier in this document.

    Taskband

    The taskband occupies the middle part of the taskbar. It contains taskbar buttons that you use to

    start programs and switch among the programs and windows that are already open. In the default

    view, the taskbar button for each program appears as a single button, even when multiple windows

    are open for a program. You can customize the taskbar to change how buttons appear and how

    they group together when you have multiple open windows, or you can choose to see individual

    buttons for each open window. You can also rearrange the taskbar buttons by dragging them so

    they appear in the order you prefer.

    By default, when a taskbar button has the focus, Windows displays a thumbnail containing an

    image of each open window for the associated program. A thumbnail can also contain a toolbar

    ? 2010 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved. 5

Accessibility: Transitioning to Windows 7

    below the thumbnail image that lets you quickly access frequently used commands for a program

    without restoring the window or switching to it. For example, the thumbnail for a Windows Media?

    Player window can contain a toolbar with commands such as Previous, Next, Play, and so on.

    Note Windows does not display thumbnails if you are using a theme such as Windows? 7

    Basic, Windows Classic, or one of the high-contrast themes. For more information, see What

    is a theme?

    Each taskbar button has a Jump List that you can access by using the Application key, which is

    labeled with the following icon:

The Jump List contains a list of recently opened items, along with lists of frequently opened items,

    tasks, and websites. The bottom three items in the Jump List are common to all programs. They

    include commands to start a new instance of the program, unpin the program from the taskbar,

    and close all of the program’s windows (assuming that the program is running).

    Deskband

    A deskband, an area to the right of (or below) the taskband, is a place where a program can put a

    small icon that gives you access to the program’s important commands. The taskbar can include

    multiple deskbands, or none at all. You can move deskbands to the left of the taskband if you want

    to.

    Some programs that have used deskbands in previous versions are moving taskband functionality

    to the thumbnail toolbar. For example, Windows Media Player no longer has a deskband; instead, it

    provides buttons in the thumbnail toolbar that you can use to control media playback.

    Notification Area

    The notification area is near the right end (or near the bottom) of the taskbar. It includes a clock

    and icons that communicate the status of certain programs and computer settings. You can also

    keep the rest of the icons on hand in an overflow area where you can access them by clicking the

    Show hidden icons button. The notification area includes the Action Center icon that provides important notification messages and helpful information about security and maintenance settings.

    Other icons may also be present depending on which programs or services you have installed and

    how your computer manufacturer set up your computer.

    Show Desktop Button

    The Show desktop button is at the opposite end of the taskbar from the Start button. You can click it (or press the Windows logo key+D) to minimize all windows to reveal the desktop. Clicking

    the Show desktop button a second time restores all windows to their previous positions.

    The Show desktop button also lets you temporarily view or peek at the desktop by pointing your

    mouse at the Show desktop button, without clicking it. Any open windows fade from view,

    revealing the desktop. The windows reappear when you move the mouse away from the Show desktop button.

    Navigation Model for the Taskbar

    The taskbar has a hierarchical navigation model. The taskbar is the root item, and the Start button, the taskband, the notification area, and the Show desktop button are the taskbar’s subitems (or child items). Each of these has child items of its own, except for the Show desktop button. The organization of items in the taskbar hierarchy is as follows:

    ? 2010 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved. 6

Accessibility: Transitioning to Windows 7

    ? Start button

    ? Taskband

     Taskbar button

     Thumbnail

     Thumbnail toolbar

     Jump List

    ? Notification area

     Notification icon

     Show hidden icons button

     Notification overflow area

    ? Show desktop button

For information about the navigation model of the Start menu, see the Start Menu section earlier

    in this document.

    Navigation Tips for the Taskbar

    You can use the Windows logo key+T to move to the first taskbar button in the taskband. From

    there, you can use the TAB key or SHIFT+TAB to cycle through the taskbar’s child items and the

    current desktop icon, in the following order:

    1. first taskbar button

    2. notification area

    3. Show desktop button 4. current desktop icon

    5. Start button

    The following sections provide tips on how to navigate the parts of the taskbar.

    Navigating the Taskband

    When the taskband has the focus, you can navigate among the taskbar buttons by using the LEFT

    and RIGHT ARROW keys. If you set the focus to a taskbar button for a program that is not running

    yet, you can start the program by pressing the ENTER key or the SPACEBAR key.

    Navigating Thumbnails

    If a program is running, the system displays a thumbnail that shows an image of each open

    window for the program. If the program has only one open window, you can press the ENTER key

    or the SPACEBAR key to switch to the window. If the program has multiple open windows, pressing

    ENTER, SPACEBAR, or the UP ARROW key sets the focus to the first image in the thumbnail. From

    there, you can use the LEFT and RIGHT ARROW keys to navigate among the images, and ENTER or

    SPACEBAR to switch to the window that corresponds to the selected image. If a window’s

    thumbnail image includes a toolbar, press the DOWN ARROW key once to access the toolbar.

    To access the shortcut menu for an open window, navigate to the window’s thumbnail image and

    then press the Application key or SHIFT+F10. This gives you access to the Move, Size, Minimize,

    Maximize, and Close commands. Use the ESC key or the DOWN ARROW key to hide the thumbnail and return the focus to the

    taskbar button.

    ? 2010 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved. 7

Accessibility: Transitioning to Windows 7

    Navigating Jump Lists

    You can access the Jump List for a taskbar button by pressing the Application key and then

    pressing either the TAB key or the UP ARROW key to navigate into the list. The TAB key sets the

    focus to the item at the top of the list, and the UP ARROW key sets the focus to the bottom item.

    You can use the UP and DOWN ARROW keys to navigate through the items. To pin or unpin items

    in the Jump List, first navigate to an item, press the RIGHT ARROW key to set the focus to the

    pushpin icon, and then press the ENTER key or the SPACEBAR key. Be aware that not all Jump List

    items can be pinned. For example, application commands and tasks are static and can’t be pinned

    or removed, but you can pin or unpin recently opened items, as well as frequently opened items

    and websites.

    You can access the program’s shortcut menu by navigating to the program’s item in the Jump List

    and then pressing the Application key or SHIFT+F10. This gives you access to the program’s

    properties, and also to the Open and Run as administrator commands. Navigating the Notification Area

    When the notification area has the focus, you can use the LEFT and RIGHT ARROW keys to

    navigate among the icons. You can use the Application key or SHIFT+F10 to access the application

    menu for an icon, and the ENTER or SPACEBAR key to select an icon. Some icons display a menu

    when you select them. Examples include the Action Center icon, the network icon, and the sounds

    icon. You can use the UP ARROW key to navigate into these menus, and then use the arrow keys

    and the ENTER key to select an item. When the Show hidden icons button has the focus, you can use the UP ARROW key to navigate into the notification overflow area.

    Navigation Keys

    The following table describes the keys that you use to navigate the various parts of the taskbar.

    Key Action

    Windows logo key+T Set the focus to the first taskbar button and display the button’s

    thumbnail.

    Windows logo Select a particular taskbar button. The behavior varies as follows:

    key+number ? If the program is not running, start the program. (0 through 9 only) ? If the program is running and has only one open window, switch to

    that window.

    ? If the program is running with multiple open windows, display the

    thumbnail and set the focus to the first thumbnail image. Subsequent

    presses of the Windows logo key+number will cycle through the

    images.

    Windows logo key+B Set the focus to the first icon in the notification area. Windows logo key+D Click the Show Desktop button. Windows logo key+M Minimize all windows.

    Application key If a taskbar button has the focus, display the Jump List for the button.

    If a notification icon has the focus, display the application menu for the

    icon.

    ENTER or SPACEBAR Invoke the item that has the focus. LEFT ARROW If the taskband has the focus, move backward through the taskbar

    buttons.

    If the notification area has the focus, move backward through the icons in ? 2010 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved. 8

Accessibility: Transitioning to Windows 7

    the notification area.

    RIGHT ARROW If the taskband has the focus, move forward through the taskbar buttons.

    If the notification area has the focus, move forward through the icons in

    the notification area.

    UP ARROW If a toolbar button has the focus, navigate to the button’s first thumbnail.

    If the Show hidden icons button has the focus, navigate into the

    notification overflow area.

    DOWN ARROW If a thumbnail has the focus, navigate to the thumbnail toolbar, if

    present. Otherwise, return the focus to the current taskbar button.

    TAB Navigate to the next taskbar item. SHIFT+TAB Navigate to the previous taskbar item. ESC Leave the current item and return to the previously active item.

See Also

    Change how buttons appear on the taskbar

    The taskbar (overview)

    Using Jump Lists to open programs and items

    What’s new with the Windows 7 taskbar?

    Windows Explorer

    Windows Explorer windows are the main tools that you use to find, view, and manage information

    and resources in Windows?. In Microsoft Windows? XP, Windows Explorer changes depending on

    what you’re working with. Windows Vista? simplified Windows Explorer so that you use the same

    interface to work with almost everything on your computer, including your documents, photos,

    programs, devices, and Internet content. In Windows 7, the Windows Explorer interface has been

    further refined to enable you to get things done in fewer steps. The search box in Windows 7 lets

    you find files and start programs by typing a bit of information about the item that you’re looking

    for. Keyboard shortcuts added in Windows 7 make it easier for you to do common Windows

    Explorer tasks from the keyboard. In addition, the Windows Explorer list view was rewritten in

    Windows 7 to use a more modern UI accessibility framework, providing accessibility programs with

    easier access to the list view.

    Windows Explorer Structure

    The main parts of Windows Explorer include the address bar, the Back and Forward buttons, the search box, the command bar, the navigation pane, and the content area. These and other

    important parts are briefly described in the following sections.

    Address Bar

    The address bar appears at the top of Windows Explorer and displays your current location as a

    breadcrumb bara series of links separated by arrows. You can navigate to a different location by

    clicking a link or by typing the path of a location. The address bar also features drop-down menus

    along the current navigation path, enabling you to easily backtrack or navigate forward anywhere

    along an address path. You can browse the Internet by typing a URL in the address bar, which

    replaces the open folder with your default web browser.

    Other parts of the address bar include:

    ? 2010 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved. 9

Accessibility: Transitioning to Windows 7

    ? Previous Location button Displays a list of the locations you visited recently. The most

    recent location is at the top of the list, and the oldest location is at the bottom.

    ? Refresh button Reloads the content area (described later) for the current location. Back and Forward Buttons

    The Back and Forward buttons appear to the left of the address bar. You can use them to navigate to other folders or libraries that you already opened without closing the current window.

    These buttons work with the address bar; after you use the address bar to change folders, for

    example, you can use the Back button to return to the previous folder. Just to the right of the

    Forward button is the Recent Pages button, which shows a list of locations that you visited

    recently. You can navigate to a recent location just by selecting an item from the list.

    Search Box

    The search box is located to the right of the address bar. As you enter a word, a phrase, or even a

    date, Windows immediately starts searching for matching files names, file properties (metadata),

    and text within each file and returns results in just moments.

    When the search box gets the focus, it displays a drop-down list of your previous searches, if there

    are any. Below the list are buttons that you can use to filter the search results. The available

    buttons change depending on the current location. For instance, when you are browsing in

    Computer or Favorites, the filter buttons include Date modified and Size. When you are browsing

    in Libraries, the filter buttons change depending on the type of library and the amount of space

    that is available under the search box for displaying the filter buttons. You can expand the box to

    reveal any hidden filters buttons. When you are browsing in your Pictures library, for example, the

    filter buttons might include Albums, Artists, Genre, Length, Folder path, Year, Rating, and

    Title.

    Command Bar

    The command bar is a horizontal toolbar below the address bar that spans the width of Windows

    Explorer. It gives you quick access to common commands such as changing the appearance of your

    files and folders, burning files to a CD, or starting a digital picture slide show. The toolbar's buttons

    change to show only the tasks that are relevant. For example, if you select a picture file, the

    command bar shows different buttons than it would if you select a music file.

    The command bar contains the following buttons that are always present, regardless of the current

    file type:

    ? Organize button Displays a menu of commands that you can use to organize and manage

    files and folders in the content view.

    ? Change your view button Changes the appearance and amount of detail shown for items in

    the content pane.

    ? Preview pane button Shows or hides the preview pane (described later). ? Help button Provides detailed information about Windows Explorer.

    Navigation Pane

    The navigation pane fills the left side of the Windows Explorer window, below the command bar.

    You can use the navigation pane to access libraries, folders, network locations, saved searches,

    and even entire hard disks. The navigation pane can include the following sections:

    ? Favorites Use the Favorites section to open your most commonly used folders and searches.

    ? 2010 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved. 10

Report this document

For any questions or suggestions please email
cust-service@docsford.com