DOC

Deploying Windows Server 2003 Terminal Server to Host - Microsoft

By Alfred Bryant,2014-05-07 13:42
12 views 0
Deploying Windows Server 2003 Terminal Server to Host - Microsoft

Deploying Windows Server 2003 Terminal

    Server to Host User Desktops in a Windows

    Small Business Server 2003 Environment

Microsoft Corporation

    Published: September 2004

    Version: 2

Abstract

    By adding an additional server to your Microsoft? Windows? Small Business Server 2003

    network, you can enable Terminal Server. Using Terminal Server, you can host your users’

    desktops. This can save your organization money by allowing you to extend the life of your

    desktop hardware.

    For the most up-to-date product documentation, see the Microsoft Web site at

    http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=33326.

    The information contained in this document represents the current view of Microsoft Corporation on the issues discussed as of the date of publication. Because Microsoft must respond to changing market conditions, it should not be interpreted to be a commitment on the part of Microsoft, and Microsoft cannot guarantee the accuracy of any information presented after the date of publication.

This White Paper is for informational purposes only. MICROSOFT MAKES NO WARRANTIES, EXPRESS, IMPLIED OR STATUTORY, AS TO THE INFORMATION IN THIS DOCUMENT.

Complying with all applicable copyright laws is the responsibility of the user. Without limiting the rights under copyright, no part of this document may be reproduced, stored in or introduced into a retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means (electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or otherwise), or for any purpose, without the express written permission of Microsoft Corporation.

    Microsoft may have patents, patent applications, trademarks, copyrights, or other intellectual property rights covering subject matter in this document. Except as expressly provided in any written license agreement from Microsoft, the furnishing of this document does not give you any license to these patents, trademarks, copyrights, or other intellectual property.

Unless otherwise noted, the example companies, organizations, products, domain names, e-mail addresses, logos, people, places, and events depicted herein are fictitious, and no association with any real company, organization, product, domain name, e-mail address, logo, person, place, or event is intended or should be inferred.

    ? 2004 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.

Microsoft, ActiveX, Outlook, Win32, Windows, and Windows Server are either registered trademarks or trademarks of Microsoft Corporation in the U.S.A. and/or other countries.

The names of actual companies and products mentioned herein may be the trademarks of their respective owners.

    Contents

    Objective .............................................................................................................................. 5 Upgrading from Small Business Server 2000 with Terminal Services Enabled .......... 7 Overview of Planning and Deploying Terminal Server in a Windows Small

    Business Server Environment ............................................................................................ 8 Step 1: Plan Server and Network Resources ................................................................... 9 Step 2: Choose the Licensing Mode ............................................................................... 10 Step 3: Configure the Terminal Server Role .................................................................. 11 Step 4: Create an Administrator Account ...................................................................... 12 Step 5: Create a Computer Account and Connect to the Network ............................. 13 Step 6: Configure Terminal Server Licensing ................................................................ 14 Step 7: Redirect My Documents Folders ........................................................................ 16 Step 8: Install Client Applications................................................................................... 16 Step 9: Configure Client Computers ............................................................................... 18 Related Links ..................................................................................................................... 19

    Objective

    By adding an additional server to your Microsoft? Windows? Small Business Server 2003

    network, you can enable Terminal Server. Using Terminal Server, you can host your users’

    desktops. This can save your organization money by allowing you to extend the life of your

    desktop hardware.

    Note

    You can also host line-of-business applications with Terminal Server for central administration of the application and data. For more information about hosting line-of-business applications with Terminal Server, click , click , and then search for “Program considerations”. In addition, see “Hosting Applications with Terminal Server” at the Microsoft TechNet Web site (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=19636).

    After you have installed the Microsoft? Windows? Small Business Server 2003 operating

    system and have completed the To Do List, you can join an additional server to your network and

    configure it as a terminal server.

    What is Terminal Server?

    The Terminal Server component of the Microsoft Windows Server? 2003 operating system can

    deliver the Windows desktop, in addition to Windows-based applications, from a centralized

    server to virtually any desktop computing device, including those that cannot run Windows.

    Terminal Services transmits only the user interface of the program to the client computer. The

    client computer then returns keyboard and mouse clicks to be processed by the server. Terminal

    Server uses the Remote Desktop Protocol (RDP) to communicate between client and server.

    Client computers connecting to the terminal server can run Windows (including the Microsoft?

    Windows? CE operating system) or run on other operating systems such as the Apple Macintosh

    or even UNIX (using a third-party add-on). Each user sees only their individual session, which is

managed transparently by the server operating system and is independent of any other client

    session.

    Terminal Services and Windows Small Business Server

    You cannot run Terminal Services in Application Mode on a server that is running Windows

    Small Business Server 2003. Because Terminal Services is optimized for the desktop experience,

    it does not coexist well with the rest of the applications and services that Windows Small

    Business Server includes. Terminal Services and Windows Small Business Server contend for

    the same resources and can conflict with one another, degrading the performance of both. Also,

    Windows Server 2003 and Windows Small Business Server 2003 are more secure by default than

    previous versions, making coexistence with the domain-controller capacity of Small Business

    Server unfeasible. For a small organization, it is recommended that one server run Windows

    Small Business Server and a second server run Terminal Services. To facilitate this and to

    simplify the licensing requirements for this scenario, Microsoft allows the client-access license

    (CAL) for Windows Small Business Server to satisfy the CAL requirement for Windows Server

    on the second server.

    If you are currently using Microsoft Small Business Server 2000 and have enabled Terminal

    Server in Application Server mode, use the following list to determine the Windows Small

    Business Server 2003 solution that is appropriate for you:

    ? If you currently use Terminal Server to allow mobile users to access the network and the

    user desktops, in Windows Small Business Server 2003 you can use Remote Web

    Workplace to provide this functionality. For more information about Remote Web

    Workplace, see the “Feature Guide for Windows Small Business Server 2003” at the

    Microsoft Web site (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=31801).

    ? If you currently use Terminal Server to host user desktops or line-of-business applications,

    in Windows Small Business Server 2003 you can add an additional server to your network.

    On the additional server, install either Microsoft Windows 2000 Server or Windows

    Server 2003, and enable Terminal Server. If you install Windows 2000 Server, see

    “Deploying Windows 2000 Server Terminal Server to Host User Desktops in a Windows

    Small Business Server 2003 Environment” at the Microsoft Web site

    (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=33958).

    Figure 1 illustrates your options if you are currently running Small Business Server 2000 with

    Terminal Server in Application Server mode enabled.

    错误!使用“开始”选项卡将 Heading 1,First Level Topic,h1 应用于要在此处显示的文字。

Figure 1 Options for Small Business Server 2000 with Terminal Server in Application

    Server mode enabled

    Upgrading from Small Business Server 2000

    with Terminal Services Enabled

    If you are currently hosting line-of-business applications by running Small Business Server 2000

    with Terminal Services enabled and you are planning to upgrade to Windows Small Business

    Server 2003 with an additional server configured as a terminal server, then you must consider the

    following licensing issues:

    ? If the terminal server runs Windows Server 2003, then you must have a Terminal Server

    Client Access License (TS CAL) for each device or user using the Terminal Server

    functionality.

    ? If the terminal server runs Windows 2000 Server and the client device runs Windows 2000,

    Windows XP Professional, or Windows Server 2003, then you do not need a TS CAL. For

    example, a device running Windows 2000 Professional can access a terminal server running

    Windows 2000 Server without an associated TS CAL.

    Use the following steps to prepare your server running Small Business Server 2000:

    1. Upgrade your server with Service Pack 1 for Small Business Server 2000. 2. Remove the Terminal Services role from the server using the following procedure.

To remove the Terminal Services role

    1. Click Start, click Settings, and then click Control Panel. 2. Double-click Add/Remove Programs. 3. Click Add/Remove Windows Components to open the Windows Components Wizard. 4. Clear the Terminal Services check box, and then click Next to complete the wizard.

    Note

    Do not clear the check box.

5. Uninstall your line-of-business applications from the server. You will need to reinstall them

    on the additional server.

    Overview of Planning and Deploying Terminal

    Server in a Windows Small Business Server

    Environment

    Use the following steps to plan for and deploy Terminal Server for hosting desktops in your

    small business.

    Note

    If you are deploying Terminal Server to host line-of-business applications, you need to be sure your application is compatible with Terminal Server. For more information about hosting line-of-business applications with Terminal Server, click , click , and then search for “Program considerations”. In addition, see “Hosting Applications with Terminal Server” at the Microsoft TechNet Web site (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=19636).

1. Plan server and network resources.

    2. Choose the licensing mode.

    3. Configure the Terminal Server role.

    4. Create an administrator account.

    5. Create a computer account and connect to the network.

    6. Configure Terminal Server licensing.

    7. Redirect My Documents folders.

    8. Install client applications.

    错误!使用“开始”选项卡将 Heading 1,First Level Topic,h1 应用于要在此处显示的文字。

9. Configure client computers.

    Step 1: Plan Server and Network Resources

    For optimal performance and user experience, ensure that your server and network hardware are

    sufficiently upgraded and configured. The primary tasks involved in planning server and network

    resources are:

    1. Plan the capacity of your additional server.

    2. Plan network connectivity.

    3. Plan for printers.

    Planning the Capacity of your Additional Server

    Terminal Server capacity can vary depending on factors such as type of user, server and network

    configuration, and the applications you are hosting. For adequate performance, a terminal server

    requires a minimum of 128 megabytes (MB) RAM, plus additional RAM for each user running

    applications on the server, depending on the type of user.

    A multiple-processor configuration can maximize CPU availability. In general, processor and

    memory requirements scale linearly. You can support nearly double the number of users on a

    multiprocessor-capable Pentium system by doubling the number of processors and doubling the

    amount of memory. For this reason, purchasing a system that supports multiple processors, even

    if you initially purchase only one processor, allows you to add capacity easily as your

    requirements grow.

    Use the following guidelines to determine the capacity needs for your server:

    ? User demand. The amount of RAM and CPU that Terminal Server users consume depends

    on the application features that they use, how often they use the application, and how much

    work they accomplish in any unit of time.

    ? Application considerations. Check system requirements for each application you plan to

    install on your server carefully and consider that RAM and CPU requirements increase

    according to the number of user sessions expected to run simultaneously. Because a terminal

    server shares executable resources among individual users, the memory requirements for

    additional users running the same program are typically less than the requirements for the

    first user who loads the application.

    ? Terminal Server licensing considerations. Terminal Services Licensing takes about a

    megabyte (MB) of disk space to install.

    Monitor the server load after deployment to be sure your servers have adequate capacity.

    Planning Network Connectivity

    Terminal Server works very well over low-bandwidth connections and uses whatever IP connection you provide. However, you can optimize both application and overall network performance by making sure the type of connection is appropriate for the work that is done. For example, a single user can connect over a low-bandwidth modem line and have good performance, but it is not appropriate to share a 28.8-kilobit line among an active office of 100 people.

    Note

    Printing, sound, drive redirection, and user file transfer requirements can increase bandwidth requirements and might cause performance to drop below a level that is considered acceptable performance for users.

    Planning for Printers

    When the user logs on to the terminal server, the server detects the client’s local printer and installs the appropriate printer driver on the remote computer. If multiple printers are connected to the client computer, Terminal Services defaults to routing all print jobs to the client computer’s default printer. Only printers whose drivers are available on the Windows client computer appear as available in a Remote Desktop session for local redirected printers (server-side printers are always available). If the driver for your printer is not included with the client operating system, you must manually install it on the server.

    Step 2: Choose the Licensing Mode

    To use Terminal Server in your organization, you are required to have a Windows Server 2003 license for every terminal server that you deploy in your organization as well as Terminal Server Client Access Licenses (CALs) for devices that access the terminal servers. For terminal servers that are running Windows Server 2003, there are two types of Terminal Server CALs: ? Per Device

    ? Per User

    Which CAL you choose depends on how you plan to use Terminal Server. By default, Terminal Server is configured in Per Device mode, but it can be switched to Per User mode using the Terminal Services Configuration tool (TSCC.msc). You can serve both license types from the same license server. For more information about how to set your licensing mode, see "Hosting Applications with Terminal Server" at the Microsoft TechNet Web site

    (http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=19636).

    A Terminal Server license server on your network manages the Terminal Services CALs. A license server stores all Terminal Server CAL tokens that have been installed for a terminal server and tracks the license tokens that have been issued to clients. For more information about Terminal Server licensing, click Start, click Help and Support, and then search for "Terminal

    Server Licensing overview."

Report this document

For any questions or suggestions please email
cust-service@docsford.com