DOC

High Level Colloquium on Information Literacy and Lifelong Learning

By Jill Dunn,2014-04-14 04:49
6 views 0
List of Participants at High-Level Colloquium Information Literacy and Lifelong She said an instructional design approach to Information Literacy

High-Level Colloquium on Information Literacy and Lifelong

    Learning

    Bibliotheca Alexandrina, Alexandria, Egypt

    November 6-9, 2005

    Report of a Meeting Sponsored by the United Nations Education, Scientific, and Cultural Organisation

    (UNESCO), National Forum on Information Literacy (NFIL) and the International

    Federation of Library Associations and Institutions (IFLA)

    Reported and Edited by

    Sarah Devotion Garner, J.D., M.L.I.S.

    March 2006

    Table of Contents

    A. THE ALEXANDRIA PROCLAMATION…………………………………………………..3 B. COMMENT: ―Prague and Alexandria: Steps Toward Social Inclusion‖………………..5 C. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS…………………………………………………………………….7 D. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY …………………………………………………………….…….8 E. RECOMMENDATIONS

     1. Context for Drafting and Acceptance of Recommendations……………………10

    2. Learning & Education……………………………………………………................11

     3. Health & Human Services……………………………………………………….…14

     4. Economic Development…………………………………………………………….17

     5. Governance & Citizenship…………………………………………………………..18

F. APPENDICES

     1. Remarks by Mrs. Anwar Sadat………………………………..…………………...20

     2. Remarks by Mr. Abdelaziz Abid………………………….…….............................21

     3. Remarks by Mr. Omar Sharif…………………………….……..………………….23

    4. List of Meeting Participants……………………………….………………….…… 24

     5. Programme-at-a-glance……………………………………………………….…… 28

     6. Edited Transcript of Colloquium Proceedings ……………………………….… 30

     1. INTRODUCTION

    1.1. Information Literacy ―Givens…………………………………..30

    1.2 Welcome Remarks………………………………………………..30

    2. LEARNING & EDUCATION AND INFORMATION LITERACY

     2.1 Lead Sector Experts Presentation by

     Dr. Barbara Cambridge & Dr. Penny Moore…………………..31

     2.2 Regional Perspectives……………………………………………40

     2.3 Open Discussion………………………………………………….46

    3. HEALTH & HUMAN SERVICES AND INFORMATION LITERACY

     3.1 Lead Sector Expert Presentation by Dr. Phil Candy………….54

     3.2. Regional Perspectives…………………………………………...57

     3.3 Open Discussion…………………………………………….……61

    4. ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT AND INFORMATION LITERACY

     4.1 Lead Sector Expert Presentation by Dr. Alex Byrne……….…66

     4.2 Regional Perspectives……………………………………………71

     4.3 Open Discussion………………………………………………….77

    5. GOVERNANCE & CITIZENSHIP AND INFORMATION LITERACY

     5.1 Lead Sector Expert Presentation by Mrs. Martha Gould……..81

     5.2 Comments from Governance & Citizenship

     Team Members………………………………………………... 82

    5.3 Regional Perspectives/Open Discussion…………………...….84

     2

A. THE ALEXANDRIA PROCLAMATION

    BEACONS OF THE INFORMATION SOCIETY

    THE ALEXANDRIA PROCLAMATION ON INFORMATION LITERACY AND

    LIFELONG LEARNING

Celebrating this week‘s confirmation of the site of the Pharos of Alexandria, one of the

    ancient wonders of the world, the participants in the High-Level Colloquium on

    Information Literacy and Lifelong Learning held at the Bibliotheca Alexandrina on 6-9

    November 2005 proclaim that Information Literacy and lifelong learning are the beacons

    of the Information Society, illuminating the courses to development, prosperity and

    freedom.

Information Literacy lies at the core of lifelong learning. It empowers people in all walks

    of life to seek, evaluate, use and create information effectively to achieve their personal,

    social, occupational and educational goals. It is a basic human right in a digital world

    and promotes social inclusion of all nations.

Lifelong learning enables individuals, communities and nations to attain their goals and

    to take advantage of emerging opportunities in the evolving global environment for

    shared benefit. It assists them and their institutions to meet technological, economic and

    social challenges, to redress disadvantage and to advance the well being of all.

Information Literacy

    ? comprises the competencies to recognise information needs and to locate,

    evaluate, apply and create information within cultural and social contexts;

    ? is crucial to the competitive advantage of individuals, enterprises (especially

    small and medium enterprises), regions and nations;

    ? provides the key to effective access, use and creation of content to support

    economic development, education, health and human services, and all other

    aspects of contemporary societies, and thereby provides the vital foundation for

    fulfilling the goals of the Millennium Declaration and the World Summit on the

    Information Society; and

    ? extends beyond current technologies to encompass learning, critical thinking and

    interpretative skills across professional boundaries and empowers individuals

    and communities.

     3

Within the context of the developing Information Society, we urge governments and

    intergovernmental organisations to pursue policies and programmes to promote

    Information Literacy and lifelong learning. In particular, we ask them to support

    ? regional and thematic meetings which will facilitate the adoption of Information

    Literacy and lifelong learning strategies within specific regions and

    socioeconomic sectors;

    ? professional development of personnel in education, library, information,

    archive, and health and human services in the principles and practices of

    Information Literacy and lifelong learning;

    ? inclusion of Information Literacy into initial and continuing education for key

    economic sectors and government policy making and administration, and into

    the practice of advisors to the business, industry and agriculture sectors;

    ? programmes to increase the employability and entrepreneurial capabilities of

    women and the disadvantaged, including immigrants, the underemployed and

    the unemployed; and

    ? recognition of lifelong learning and Information Literacy as key elements for the

    development of generic capabilities which must be required for the accreditation

    of all education and training programmes.

We affirm that vigorous investment in Information Literacy and lifelong learning

    strategies creates public value and is essential to the development of the Information

    Society.

Adopted in Alexandria, Egypt at the Bibliotheca Alexandrina on 9 November 2005

     4

B. COMMENT BY DR. PATRICIA SENN BREIVIK,

    Chair Emerita, The National Forum on Information Literacy

    Prague and Alexandria: Steps Toward Social Inclusion”

All of us benefited from the rich experiences of people from around the world who are

    committed to furthering the goals of Information Literacy and lifelong learning. These

    people brought to the table the political successes of Finland, the sensitivity to oralcy

    from Sub-Sahara Africa, the research on Information Literacy in the workplace from

    Australia and much, much more. What we all shared was a belief in the power of

    Information Literacy abilities to promote social inclusion for all people within today‘s

    Age of Information.

Together these events provide a solid foundation and direction for the next steps in the

    pursuit of this goal. The outcomes of the Prague event laid the theoretical foundation

    for international collaboration in promoting Information Literacy as an essential set of

    stabilities in the 21 century with the provision of over 30 papers and the discussion of a

    broadly based group of professionals. The Alexandria colloquium took those outputs

    and began the process of developing practical agendas for raising awareness and

    promoting Information Literacy and lifelong learning skills.

But what has been learned thus far that compels further efforts? There have, in fact,

    emerged some clarion calls on behalf of the have-nots and disenfranchised of our world.

    These include the following:

    ? It is time to move from ―Information for All‖ to ―Information Literacy for All.‖

    ? Information literacy abilities are essential for social inclusion in today‘s

    information-driven world.

    ? Information literacy and lifelong learning are of the same essence.

    ? Information literacy is not a technology issue but a learning issue.

    ? Information Literacy is more than a library or education issue. It is crucial to

    issues of economic development, health, citizenship and quality of life.

    ? Information literacy is part of a continuum of literacies that includes oralcy.

    ? Information literacy is context specific to particular cultures and societies.

     To enhance the likelihood of significant progress there also emerged from Alexandria a

    plan for next steps:

    ? Five regional meetings to explore the distinctive challenges of the regions and to

    collect professional insights and best practices to share with others,

    ? Four international conferences which build upon the sector specific (education &

    learning, economic development, health & human services and governance &

    citizenship) papers and discussions from the regional meetings along with the

    sector specific outcomes from Prague and Alexandria, and

    ? A world congress that builds upon all of the above to the end of raising global

    awareness of Information Literacy as part of the human right to lifelong learning.

     5

In addition, a number of issues of practical concern were clarified over the course of

    these two events, and these can be useful for further international and national

    programs on Information Literacy. They include the following:

    ? Policy makers must be targeted in efforts to promote Information Literacy. (With

    the exception of Finland, national policy makers remain largely unaware of

    Information Literacy.)

    ? Information literacy championsoutside of library and educationmust be

    identified and cultivated.

    ? NGOs must be targeted as likely partners in the promotion of Information

    Literacy.

    ? Future international and national Information Literacy conferences need to

    involve professionals from a wide range of backgrounds.

    ? Information literacy‘s importance to economic development is the key factor to

    use in promoting Information Literacy.

    ? Research is needed--particularly to document the value of Information Literacy

    to social inclusion and its value to economic development.

    ? The International Alliance for Information Literacy needs to be expanded in

    membership and further empowered.

    ? The importance of Information Literacy to the well being of nations and

    individuals requires national and international collaborations so that redundancy

    of efforts is minimized and limited resources are efficiently utilized.

These combined insights from Prague and Alexandria should be helpful to Information

    Literacy efforts around the world. The goal to which we should mutually pledge

    ourselves is to ensuring that all people are well prepared to seek the truth so that all may

    experience a better quality of life.

     6

C. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

The three main sponsorswithout whom the colloquium could not have occurredand

    their representatives were:

    ? Abdelaziz Abid, United Nations Education, Scientific, and Cultural Organisation

    ? Alex Byrne, International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions

    ? Patricia Senn Breivik, National Forum on Information Literacy

In addition to their behind-the-scenes work, all three representatives were actively

    involved in the Alexandria discussions, and they took the lead in developing ―The

    Alexandria Proclamation.‖

Other major support for the colloquium was provided through the generosity of the

    Bibliotheca Alexandrina and its Director, Dr. Ismail Serageldin, Diane and Lee

    Brandenburg of California, USA, Information Today, Inc., and the U.S. National

    Commission on Libraries and Information Science (NCLIS).

Special thanks also goes to Jill Cody for serving as facilitator of the event, Sarah

    Devotion Garner for serving as recorder, report editor and press liaison and Sohair

    Wastawy for serving as the primary liaison with the Bibliotheca Alexandrina. Particular

    gratitude must be expressed for Forest Woody Horton, Jr., who so ably coordinated all

    the logistics necessary to the event and intellectually participated in it.

Finally, of course, our gratitude goes to the awesome professionals who assembled and

    organized regional teams, offered presentations, participated in discussions and in the

    drafting of recommendations and the Alexandria Proclamation.

     7

D. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

    This Report is prefaced by The Alexandria Proclamation, and consists of Dr. Patricia Senn Breivik‘s summary of outcomes, ―Prague and Alexandria: Steps Toward Social

    Inclusion,” and the acknowledgements in Part C. Part D, this executive summary,

    highlights the discussion and recommendations made by the meeting participants. Part E consists of the Recommendations formulated by the Colloquium participants. Part F, which consists of Appendices, including key speeches made by distinguished guests, a list of meeting participants, the programme agenda, and concludes with an edited transcript of the Colloquium proceedings to facilitate readers obtaining more detail on issues of particular concern to them.

    The High-Level Colloquium on Information Literacy and Lifelong Learning was opened by Dr. Patricia Senn Breivik, who provided a set of ―Information Literacy givens‖ as a framework for discussions, and Mr. Abdelaziz Abid, who discussed the importance of Information Literacy and particularly the importance of teachers.

The first Sector Discussion, Education and Lifelong Learning, presented six propositions

    regarding Learning & Education and Information Literacy, which reflect conditions that underpin the relationship between Information Literacy and student learning outcomes that should flow on to lifelong learning and community participation. The Regional Team Leaders discussed both problems and best practices within their own regions, such as the Bologna Process‘s effect on Europe as well as differing levels of achievement in the old and new European member states, the effect of SARS and the December 2004 tsunami on Asia, immigration and pockets of poverty in North America, oralcy, HIV-AIDS, the Sub-Saharan African need to address how people learn Information Literacy when they are not educated in the Western system, and the effects of trying to move into a Knowledge Society in different parts of the Middle East and North African region. An open discussion by all participants followed, where the conversation clustered around themes such as the need for collaboration; working with traditional/formal partners, but also with Non-Governmental Organizations and others; standards; need for strategic planning, assessment and the move from Information for All to Information Literacy for All. The Sector co-lead Sector Experts were Dr. Barbara Cambridge and Dr. Penny Moore.

The second Sector Discussion, Health & Human Services, focused on the importance of

    Information Literacy in health and human services and discussed issues and considerations for healthcare practitioners, health care managers, policy makers, patients and the wider public. Participants were challenged to think about what might be done to advance Information Literacy, both conceptually and practically. The regional panellists, as well as participants in the open discussion, discussed areas in which they wished for more help and shared many good examples of successful ideas and models. They emphasized the importance of culture and the individual‘s environment, as well as the need for continuous learning and professional development. It became clear that Health Information Literacy had more aggressive outreach aspects than general Information Literacy efforts. The Lead Sector Expert was Dr. Phil Candy.

     8

    Economic Development, the third Sector to be discussed, framed Information Literacy as fundamental for economic development, as economies work on information and

    transmission of information. The International Federation of Library Associations

    (IFLA), the World Summit on the Information Society, and the UN Millenium Goals

    were examined in detail. Strategies were offered for the participants to use, and a ―pull‖

    approach rather than a traditional ―push‖ approach to evoke change was advocated.

    Regional discussions centred on the difficulties in sharing information in environments

    where having knowledge is equated with personal power and where inequities in

    opportunity, access and education exist. The open discussion was focused on

    empowering people to be able to locate, evaluate and use information effectively. The

    most common thread was empowering small and medium businesses and their owners-

    -including home-based workers. Other topics included culture, need to do research,

    importance of assessment, collaboration and partnership and the need for strategic

    planning within the context of the funding priorities of agencies and governments. Dr.

    Alex Byrne served as Lead Sector Expert.

The final Sector Discussion, Governance & Citizenship, focused on how to position

    ourselves in interacting with politicians on the local, state and national level. The impact

    of Information Literacy, or lack of it, on existing public policy was addressed. The

    necessity of developing specific skills such as strategic planning and negotiation was

    stressed. Members of the Governance & Citizenship team commented on how to

    empower individuals to be effective citizens through Information Literacy. The

    Regional and Open discussions included the following topics: how to deal with

    politicians, the influence of international and national organizations at the national level,

    and the shift required by nascent democracies to move from a society in which

    information is controlled to a society where information is freely available. Mrs. Martha

    Gould was the Lead Sector Expert.

Four working groups, one per sector, drafted recommendations, which were reviewed

    and revised by all participants in an open session. They identified promising

    implementation and communication strategies that are working well in individual

    countries and may offer models that can be utilized by many countries or perhaps even

    by an entire region. These efforts also complement UNESCO‘s key Information Literacy and lifelong learning policy and programme goals, such as its Information-for-All

    Programme (IFAP), Education-for-All-Programme (EFAP); and the initiatives being

    undertaken under the umbrella of the UN Literacy Decade (2003-2012).

The meeting culminated with the creation and adoption of The Alexandria Proclamation,

    the lead-in document in this Report, which urges governments and international

    organisations to pursue policies and programmes to promote Information Literacy and

    lifelong learning because they are essential to inclusion, economic development and

    quality of life in today‘s Information Society.

     9

E. RECOMMENDATIONS

1. Context for the drafting and acceptance of recommendations

    The colloquium discussions were challenged by intertwining issues of: (1) information and Information Literacy, (2) generic aspects of Information Literacy and its contextualised manifestations, (3) supply of and demand for Information Literacy programmes and interventions, (4) detailed but not especially helpful divisions between types, sources and channels of communication and (5) slippages between inputs (or preconditions) and desired outcomes. Dr. Candy reiterated that one person‘s outcomes is another‘s precondition and that supply of information is not the same as demand for Information Literacy

    There was agreement that recommendations must: (1) present a compelling vision of the future while preserving the ―memory of the world‖, (2) be framed in the context of the next steps, (3) be linked to existing high level protocols, agreements and statements upon which there already is agreement, (4) recognise that people have different reasons both for advocating and engaging in Information Literacy; (5) recognise that Information Literacy has generic as well as domain specific aspects; (6) create an irresistible demand for Information Literacy programmes and interventions; (7) focus on the international or supra-national level, (8) create a context in which others can better act locally; (9) acknowledge the different political, technological and cultural realities in different parts of the world and (10) identify potential networks and partnerships with which to work.

    The following sets of recommendations came from the work of small group teams. Their recommendation drafts were then reviewed by all participants in open discussions; recommendations not receiving general consensus were omitted. Formats vary in keeping with the styles adopted by each team. In some cases recommendations address issues somewhat beyond the focus of the colloquium but are important and closely related to Information Literacy and lifelong learning (e.g., information access). These have been left intact among the other recommendations.

     10

Report this document

For any questions or suggestions please email
cust-service@docsford.com