DOC

ANTH 303 Human Skeletal Anatomy

By Lorraine Wagner,2014-05-13 11:03
6 views 0
ANTH 303 Human Skeletal Anatomy

    ANTH 303: Human Skeletal Anatomy

    TR: 1:00 2:15 pm

    Professor: T.R. Pickering, Ph.D.

    Contact: tpickering@wisc.edu

    Office: 5407 Social Science Building

    Office Hours: MT, 10:00 11:00 am or by appointment

    Required Text: The Human Bone Manual (2005), by Tim D. White and Pieter A. Folkens. Academic

     Press: Burlington (MA).

    Recommended Text: Human Osteology, 2nd Edition (2000), by Tim D. White and Pieter Folkens.

     Academic Press: San Diego.

Course Description: This course is designed to provide a thorough understanding of the human

    skeletal system. That understanding is a fundamental step that allows researchers to explore more deeply

    other aspects of biological anthropology, including (but not limited to): demographic distributions of

    skeletal populations, the nutritional and health conditions, racial origins and taphonomic histories of

    skeletons, and, in the case of our earliest hominid ancestors, their taxonomic status and morphological

    adaptations.

The foci of this class are gaining expertise: (1) in bone and dental biology and (2) in bone, bone fragment,

    tooth and tooth fragment identification. This is not a course in forensic anthropology. This course does not, for example, deal with bone pathology, other injuries incurred in vivo or ageing and sexing of skeletal

    remainsalthough the skills you acquire in this course are the obvious prerequisites for pursuit of these

    types of advanced studies. The wait-list for this class is long and space is limited to just twelve

    students maximum; if this class is not what you expected, please talk to the instructor as soon as

    possible, so arrangements might be made for your early, no-penalty drop and the addition of

    another wait-listed student.

Each classroom meeting falls into one of three categories: lecture, practice or exam. Lectures are

    conducted by Pickering and will provide instruction on each day’s topic as outlined below. Practices are meetings devoted to the students’ hands-on practice with relevant skeletal materials in preparation for the exams.

    Course Requirements and Methods of Evaluation: The attached schedule notifies you of each day’s topic and the accompanying required reading from White and Folkens. There are a total of five in-class

    exams that will serve as the basis of your final grade in the class. The first exam (2/13) is based on the

    lectures and assigned readings up to that point. The following exams (2/27, 3/13, 4/17, 5/3) are

    laboratory practicals, in which you will be presented with bones, bone fragments, teeth and tooth

    fragments for identification, as well as with other, short-answer written questions. Make-up exams

    will only be given in extreme cases, such as death in the family or serious illness on part of the

    student (proper documentation of such situations—such as a doctor’s excuse—will be required

    from the student).

Your final grade will be based on your combined exam totals.

     1

Attendance is not required, but you will likely fail the course if you do not attend regularly since exams

    are based exclusively on lecture information, required readings and classroom practice. Your mastery of

    bone and tooth identification (the basis of the majority of your grade) is dependent mostly on two

    factors: (1) natural aptitude (you either have this or you don’t; it cannot be developed); and (2) your

    commitment to practicing with the laboratory materials (unlike aptitude, you are in complete control of

    developing this aspect of expertise).

Getting a good grade in this class requires regular, dedicated practice with the provided skeletal

    materials. In addition, a good grade is dependent on memorization and accurate recall of bone

    and tooth features, as well as much anatomical terminology.

    The course is demanding, but the skills you develop in it will serve you well if you plan on

    a career in biological anthropology or in the biomedical sciences.

    Respect for and Handling of Laboratory Materials

    All skeletal material, fossil and primate casts, and instruments used in the laboratory are to be handled respectfully and carefully. Human skeletal material is very limited countrywide and its use, even in

    academic instruction, is a sensitive topic. The material derives from once-living people; we are fortunate

    that through their generosity and that of their relatives we are able to study it. Respect that generosity

    and their memory. Disrespectful handling of materials will result automatically in a failing grade

    for the course.

    Under NO circumstances should any item be removed from the laboratory. Unauthorized removal of materials from the laboratory will result automatically in a failing grade for the course. Careful

    handling applies especially to skulls which are often in fragile condition. When the skull is lifted, it should

    always be held firmly. Never lift the skull by inserting the fingers into the orbits. The medial walls of the

    orbits are composed of several easily damaged bones. Similarly, a skull should never be lifted by the

    zygomatic arches that extend laterally along the skull beneath the temples. These, too, are easily broken.

The skeletal materials that you will come into contact in this course are part of a teaching collection. It is

    probable that some breakage may occur due to the amount of handling that these materials experience, but

    care to preserve them should always be taken. If breaks or defects (such as cracks or loose teeth) are

    observed, please, inform the instructor so that necessary repairs can be made.

This is your copy of the laboratory rules; a second, separate copy will be distributed to each student for

    his/her signature, indicating he/she understands and agrees to adhere to these rules.

     2

    Academic Integrity Each student is responsible for preparing his or her own work. Cheating and plagiarism on exams or

    assignments will not be tolerated. Students who do so receive failing grades for the exam or

    assignment. Cases of cheating and plagiarism may be pursued further under the university’s regulations

    concerning academic misconduct. Please refer to the university’s guide to academic misconduct

    (www.wisc.edu/students/amsum.htm) if you do not know the university’s policy.

    Students with Disabilities The University of Wisconsin encourages qualified persons with disabilities to participate in its programs

    and activities. If you need any type of special accommodation in this course, or if you have questions

    about physical access, please notify the instructor and your TA immediately (within the first three weeks

    of classes).

     3

    Date Topic Chapters

    1/23 Introduction None

    1/25 The skeletal system 4, 6

    1/30 Bone biology and anatomy 4

    2/1 Dental anatomy 8 (pp. 127-133)

    2/6 Taphonomy: disarticulation, disassociation, fragmentation 5

    and modification of skeletal remains

    2/8 Cannibalism 5

    2/13 EXAM

    2/15 Trunk: hyoid, vertebrae, ribs, sternum 9, 10

    2/20 Shoulder girdle: scapulae, clavicles 11

    2/22 PRACTICE

    2/27 EXAM

    3/1 Upper limb: humeri, radii, ulnae 12

    3/6 Upper limb: carpals, metacarpals, phalanges 13

    3/8 PRACTICE

    3/13 EXAM

    3/15 Pelvic girdle: sacrum, coccyx, os coxae 14

    3/20 Lower limb: femora, patellae, tibiae, fibulae 15

    3/22 Lower limb: tarsals, metatarsals, phalanges 16

    4/10 PRACTICE

    4/12 PRACTICE

    4/17 EXAM

    4/19 Skull 7

    4/24 Dentition 8

     4

    5/1 PRACTICE

    5/3 EXAM

    5/8 Differences in skeletal anatomy between modern humans None

    and pre-modern hominids

    5/10 Summary None

     5

    Respect for and Handling of Laboratory Materials

    All skeletal material, fossil and primate casts, and instruments used in the laboratory are to be handled respectfully and carefully. Human skeletal material is very limited countrywide and its use, even in

    academic instruction, is a sensitive topic. The material derives from once-living people; we are fortunate

    that through their generosity and that of their relatives we are able to study it. Respect that generosity

    and their memory. Disrespectful handling of materials will result automatically in a failing grade

    for the course.

    Under NO circumstances should any item be removed from the laboratory. Unauthorized removal of materials from the laboratory will result automatically in a failing grade for the course. Careful

    handling applies especially to skulls which are often in fragile condition. When the skull is lifted, it should

    always be held firmly. Never lift the skull by inserting the fingers into the orbits. The medial walls of the

    orbits are composed of several easily damaged bones. Similarly, a skull should never be lifted by the

    zygomatic arches that extend laterally along the skull beneath the temples. These, too, are easily broken.

The skeletal materials that you will come into contact in this course are part of a teaching collection. It is

    probable that some breakage may occur due to the amount of handling that these materials experience, but

    care to preserve them should always be taken. If breaks or defects (such as cracks or loose teeth) are

    observed, please, inform the instructor so that necessary repairs can be made.

I HAVE READ, UNDERSTAND FULLY, AND AGREE TO THE CONDITIONS OF THE

    ABOVE LABORATORY RULES FOR:

    ANTHROPOLOGY 303, HUMAN SKELETAL ANATOMY

_________________________________________________________________________

    Print Name

_____________________________________________, _____________________________

    Signature Date

     6

Report this document

For any questions or suggestions please email
cust-service@docsford.com