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PECI Report

By Hector Morris,2014-01-20 02:42
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PECI Report

     Depending on the scope of the project, the Ongoing Commissioning Plan can be developed by the

    commissioning provider as part of a retrocommissioning project’s Hand-off Phase. This Plan is considered a

    persistence strategy and may be offered as an additional service to the owner. Note that the following

    documents may also be used to help satisfy both the Energy & Atmosphere prerequisite and various credit

    requirements for LEED-EB. The intent of the document is to assist the building staff in maintaining the

    benefits gained from the retrocommissioning project. A template and filled in sample is provided below.

     The following template and sample documents are intended to be used as a guide and springboard for

    developing an Ongoing Commissioning Plan. The template offers possible plan headings (topics) with

    introductory language under each heading and a menu of documents for inclusion in the appendix. The

    language and appendicies in this document should be modified according to the needs and scope of each

    project.

Ongoing Commissioning Plan - Template

    Ongoing Commissioning Plan

    For

    [Client Name]

    On

    [Building Name]

    Submitted by

    [Company Name and Address]

    [Date]

[Insert company logo]

    Table of Contents

    Executive Summary ....................................................................................... 1

    Introduction .................................................................................................... 2

    1. Understanding the Implemented Measures ............................................ 2

    2. Performing O&M Persistence Activities ................................................. 3

    Operations ................................................................................................ 3

    Maintenance .............................................................................................. 4

    3. Tracking Building Energy Performance Over Time ............................... 6

    Benchmarking........................................................................................... 6

    Energy Use Analysis ................................................................................ 7

    4. Review Training Needs ............................................................................. 7

    Appendices .................................................................................................... 8

    Logo

    Executive Summary

    [Company Name] in conjunction with the [Client Name] and [Partner Name], completed the

    implementation of [X] improvements identified in the retrocommissioning study on the

    [Building Name] located in [Geographic Location], resulting in an annual utility cost

    savings of approximately $[X], or [X]% of total utility costs.

    The following Ongoing Commissioning Plan (OCP) is intended to identify steps that should be taken periodically by the facility manager and building technicians to ensure the

    implemented retrocommissioning measures and associated energy savings persist over time.

    These steps include:

    1. Understanding the Implemented Measures. The plan summarizes the

    measures implemented as a result of the retrocommissioning process including

    specifically what changes were made.

    2. Performing O&M Persistence Activities. The plan includes a description

    of what facility staff should do to ensure optimized system operation persists

    over time.

    3. Tracking Building Energy Performance Over Time. The plan includes a

    description of what facility staff should do to track and verify optimized system

    operation persists over time. This includes benchmarking and energy use

    analysis.

    4. Reviewing Training Needs. The plan outlines the training that has been

    provided as part of the retrocommissioning process along with recommendations

    for future training and education for both building management and facility

    operators.

    The following documents have been included in the appendix to assist the building staff in

    carrying out O&M activities that ensure the retrocommissioning benefits last.

    Appendix A: Retrocommissioning Implementation Summary Report.

    This document briefly describes each measure identified during the

    retrocommissioning process, the implementation status, and any future

    recommendations to maintain and enhance system performance. The intent of

    this document is to be an “at-a-glance” summary for the owner to make all

    implementation issues clear and concise in one table.

    Appendix B: Building Systems Sequence of Operations. This

    document outlines the updated sequence of operations for all HVAC and lighting

    control systems, as well as integration of the fire/life safety and HVAC systems.

    Appendix C: Monitoring Action Plan This document outlines each

    sequence of operation and describes what facility staff should look for, what to

    look at, and what to do when issues arise to ensure optimized system

    performance persists over time.

    Appendix D: Sensor Calibration/Replacement Plan. This document

    describes which sensors should be calibrated, how frequently they need to be

    checked, and the acceptable measurement range between the sensor and a hand-

    held calibrated device.

    Appendix E: Training Plan. This document allows an at-a-glance view of the

    training topics critical to getting long lasting benefits from the retrocomissioning

    process. It summarizes the training content, who should receive the training,

    when it is most valuable, and a column for the names of those who received the

    training and the date they received it.

    Introduction

    In order to ensure the energy savings achieved by the retrocommissioning process

    persist over time, the following Ongoing Commissioning Plan (OCP) has been developed. The plan outlines steps that should be taken by both facility managers

    and operating staff to verify proper system operation. Table 1 lists the contact

    information of the original RCx team.

    Table 1: Project Contact Information

    Name: Company Name VM: Title: CELL:

    Name: Company Name VM: Title: CELL:

    Name: Company Name VM: Title: CELL:

    Name: Company Name VM: Title: CELL:

    Name: Company Name VM: Title: CELL:

    Building Description

    The [Building Name] is located in downtown [Geographic Location]. There are a

    total of [X] floors including [X] that make up the gross square footage of [X].

    Construction was completed on [Date].

    Systems Description

    [Insert a brief description of the building systems please refer to the Operating Commissioning Plan - Sample document for an example of the appropriate level of

    detail for each system description.]

    1. Understanding the Implemented Measures

    As a result of the retrocommissioning process, [X] measures were implemented that

    improved the overall HVAC system operation and optimization. The following table

    outlines all of the implemented measures along with the selected measures to be completed at a later date

    Table 2 Retrocommissioning Measure Summary 1.

    2.

    3.

    4.

    5.

    6.

    7.

    8.

    9.

    10.

    1.

    2.

    3.

    4.

    5.

    For a full description of each issue, how it impacted system operation/performance, and how it was resolved, refer to the Retrocommissioning Implementation Summary

    Report located in Appendix A. For a detailed description of savings and costs by

    measure, please refer to the Final Retrocommissioning Report submitted on [Date].

    2. Performing O&M Persistence Activities

    Operations

    Throughout the course of the retrocommissioning project, the sequence of operations was revised to enhance and optimize system performance. A comprehensive document entitled Building Systems Sequence of Operations located in Appendix B

    details the as-operating sequence of operations for the following building systems:

    ? [System]

    ? [System]

    ? [System]

    ? [System]

An additional document entitled Monitoring Action Plan (MAP) was developed to

    provide facility operators with a quick reference guide on how to keep the HVAC

    and lighting control systems optimized over time. This document is located in

    Appendix C.

    For each control strategy, the Monitoring Action Plan:

    ? Lists the verified sequence of operations

    ? Instructs facility operators on how to verify proper system operation ? Instructs facility operators on what to do if an operational problem is identified

    Best Practices (Optional Section)

    This section is an excerpt from the Monitoring Action Plan (MAP) in Appendix C

    and is included here to emphasize some of the key control strategies and ways to

    address comfort issues without adversely impacting overall system operation. The

    strategy reference numbers given here match the strategy reference numbers in the

    MAP.

    Strategy Reference #: Strategy Name

    Strategy Reference #: Strategy Name

    Strategy Reference #: Strategy Name

    Strategy Reference #: Strategy Name

    Strategy Reference #: Strategy Name

    Maintenance

    This section of the Ongoing Commissioning Plan includes a description of

    maintenance procedures that should be performed by facility operators, including

    sensor calibration and updating sequence of operations as changes are made to

    ensure all documentation is accurate.

    Sensor Calibration

    Calibrated sensors are key to proper ongoing operation of a system. This section

    describes techniques for calibration and general guidance for replacement of faulty

    sensors.

    Types of Calibration

    Single Point Calibration: For most applications, single-point calibration is accurate

    enough for sensors that will typically only sense at one point or a relatively close

range. For example, a cold-deck AHU discharge air temperature sensor can be

    calibrated at only one point since the control range is typically only about 15?F.

    Multi-Point Calibration should only be performed when accuracy over a range of

    values is important. For example, the secondary hot water supply temperature is

    often reset between 120?F and 180?F. To ensure the sensor is measuring accurately

    across the entire range, verify temperature readings at both the high and low end of

    the reset. Other sensors that may see wide variations in conditions are the outdoor

    air temperature and relative humidity sensors. It is recommended that a multi-point

    calibration be performed on these sensors as well.

    Calibration/Replacement Methods

    A typical method for temperature sensor calibration is to compare the control system

    display to a measurement from a calibrated instrument. The calibration should be

    made at a typical value for each sensor, by an instrument at least as accurate as the

    sensor that is being calibrated. Note that calibrating water flow meters is difficult,

    since it is not always practical to use a calibration flow meter at the same location.

    One possibility is to use a portable, strap-on meter in series with the permanent

    meter to verify flow. Another option is to measure differential pressure across a

    known device like a pump or triple duty valve. Use the pump or valve performance

    curves to estimate system flow based on measured pressure drop and compare this

    value to the installed flow meter reading.

    Eventually a sensor will need to be replaced because either the sensor has failed or it

    cannot be calibrated accurately If a sensor must be replaced, a field calibration

    check on the new sensor must also be conducted to ensure that the proper offset for

    the new sensor is programmed into the EMCS.

    Calibration Plan Recommendations

    The following list outlines recommendations related to sensor calibration:

    ? Sensors that are used directly in a control loop (drive the control loop) should

    be at minimum calibrated annually. Because the outside air sensor is often

    widely used in control loop applications (and is subject to more abuse than

    most sensors), it should be calibrated at least twice per year if not more often.

    Sensors should be calibrated when problems are found while monitoring

    VAV box operation. Space temperature sensors can also be calibrated

    whenever there is a trouble call or comfort call for a particular space in the

    building.

    ? Those points used for troubleshooting and evaluating system

    operation/performance such as mixed air temperature sensors can be

    calibrated less frequently.

    ? Sensor calibration should be added to any existing preventive maintenance

    program. This way, a work order will be issued to calibrate various sensors

    throughout the year, which ensures that all sensors eventually get calibrated

    within the recommended frequency.

    ? In addition, any hand-held measurement device used to calibrate sensors

    should be recalibrated per the manufacturer’s recommended schedule. The

    instrument calibration should be added to the PM program to remind the

    facility staff when it’s time to send the instruments in for calibration.

    A list of points, acceptable ranges, and frequency of calibration has been compiled

    for each major HVAC system. A copy of the Calibration Plan is provided in

    Appendix D.

    Update Sequence of Operations

    Any programming or setpoint changes made to the building automation system over

    the course of time to meet the changing needs of the building should be fully

    documented in both the Building Systems Sequence of Operations and Operational

    Monitoring Action Plan as applicable. This will ensure that accurate as-operated

    documentation is always available for facility operators. If a work order system is

    used to address trouble calls, place a check box or reminder to document any

    changes made on the Systems Sequence of Operations and Monitoring Action Plan

    on the work order form. Note that it may be necessary to update the as-built control

    drawings as well if significant modifications or additions are made to the control

    system.

    3. Tracking Building Energy Performance Over Time

    Benchmarking

    The [Benchmarking Tool Name] was used to benchmark whole building energy

    performance at the beginning and end of the retrocommissioning process (post-

    implementation) to provide a baseline for building performance. To fully capture

    the effect of retrocommissioning on the energy benchmark, it is necessary to re-

    benchmark one year post-implementation. The following table presents baseline

    benchmarks of the building’s energy performance:

    Table 3: Whole Building Energy Performance Benchmarks

The [Benchmarking Tool Name] should be used every [time frequency] to ensure

    that the post-implementation benchmark is maintained or is improving over time.

    The following section includes a description of the tool, instructions on how to use

    the tool, and examples of the post-implementation outputs as of [Date]. For more

    information on this tool, go to: [Web site address].

    [Insert Benchmarking Tool guidance here.]

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