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Activity 4 Multicultural Britain

By Ramon Roberts,2014-05-07 11:58
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Activity 4 Multicultural Britain

Activity 4: Multicultural Britain

    Background, organisation and resources

    In this activity, learners find out more about the UK as a multicultural society, it’s history

    of immigration and the development of an increasingly diverse population. They begin

    with an ‘opinion finders’ exercise to examine their own perceptions of who lives in their

    area and the origins of those groups. Learners also discuss and investigate the

    background and circumstances of their own ethnic or national group.

You might also find useful the following resources from the Post-16 Citizenship Support

    Programme:

    For the sake of argument: discussion and debating skills in citizenship (QIA 2006)

    Agree to disagree: citizenship and controversial issues (LSDA, now LSN, 2005) We all came from somewhere: diversity, identities and citizenship (QIA, 2006) Moving forward together: citizenship learning for community cohesion (QIA, 2008).

Aims of the activity

    ? To introduce a range of information about the UK, including its ethnic diversity

    ? To provide participants with the opportunity to find out more about the reasons why

    people came to Britain

    ? To encourage young people to think about the benefits of a multicultural society.

QCA-targeted learning objectives

    ? Demonstrate knowledge and understanding about citizenship issues

    ? Demonstrate understanding of respect for diversity and challenge prejudice and

    discrimination.

Tasks

    1. Give each participant a copy of the handout ‘Opinion finders – multicultural Britain,

    with one of the questions circled. You should circle roughly equal numbers of all the

    questions. It helps in the running of this activity if the sheets are printed on different

    coloured paper depending on the question circled. Explain that everyone should become

    an ‘opinion finder’ for their question. They should speak to as many people as possible

    and make notes of the responses to the question in the box. They will also be asked

    other people’s questions at the same time. They should avoid people who have the same

    question (and colour of sheet) as theirs and also just talking to their friends.

2. After 15 minutes, stop the activity and ask all those with the same question circled to

    gather together in a group. Each group should share and discuss their findings on that

    question and record the key points. They can do this on a piece of flip-chart paper, if

    available. Invite a spokesperson from each small group to report their findings to the

    whole group.

3. Organise the group into pairs and give one student ‘Card A’ and the other ‘Card B’, cut

    out from ‘The history of multicultural Britain’ and give them the following task: Each

    learner asks his/her partner questions to find out the information that is missing from

    The language of citizenship: activities for ESOL learners Activity 4 ? The Quality Improvement Agency for Lifelong Learning (‘QIA’) 2008

his/her own card. They should not look at each other’s cards. They then exchange

    information about their own ethnic groups if they are different.

4. Ask the learners if they know why the different groups came to the UK. Introduce

    vocabulary such as ‘migration’, ‘slavery’, ‘persecution’ and ‘diverse’. Ask them to read the

    text ‘Why people have migrated to Britain’ and say why each group mentioned came to

    Britain.

5. Ask each learner to find out about more about their own nationality group either from

    the Internet or by asking members of their community. They could do this in groups if

    there are several from the same ethnic group. The questions In relation to their own

    group are:

    ? When did they first arrive in the UK?

    ? Why did they leave their own countries?

    ? What did they do when they came to the UK?

    ? Where in Britain do most of them live?

    ? Which traditions from their culture are celebrated locally?

Finally, ask each learner to write a paragraph about their own ethnic group containing

    answers to the above questions. They could use the template ‘People from my country’ to

    help them. The work can then be displayed for others to read.

Assessment opportunities

    ? Demonstrate understanding of respect for diversity and challenge prejudice and

    discrimination Task 2, which invites learners to exchange information regarding

    different ethnicities and to explore difference

    ? Analyse sources of information, identify bias and draw conclusions Task 4, in which

    learners have to consult a number of sources in order to find out more about their

    own nationality group.

    The language of citizenship: activities for ESOL learners Activity 4

    ? The Quality Improvement Agency for Lifelong Learning (‘QIA’) 2008

Opinion finders multicultural Britain

    Each group should circle the question they are responsible for

    1. Name as many ethnic groups as you can in your area.

    2. Which ethnic group is the biggest one in your area?

    3. How long have the minority ethnic groups in your area lived in the UK?

    4. When did your family arrive in the UK? Did you come at the same time?

    5. Why did your family come to the UK?

    Write the responses you collect from other learners in the space below

    The language of citizenship: activities for ESOL learners Activity 4 ? The Quality Improvement Agency for Lifelong Learning (‘QIA’) 2008

The history of multicultural Britain

    Card A

    When did different ethnic groups come to Britain? Ask your partner for the

    information to complete your table. Do you know why each group came?

Who When

    Many Jews came to the UK from

    Europe…

     …in the 1950s and 60s Immigrants came here from India,

    Pakistan and Bangladesh…

     …in the 1970s and 80s …………………………………………………………………………………………………

    Card B

    When did different ethnic groups come to Britain? Ask your partner for the

    information to complete your table. Do you know why each group came?

Who When

    thth …in the 19 and 20 centuries Large numbers of people came to

    Britain from the Caribbean

     …from the 1960s to the 80s Hong Kong Chinese and

    Vietnamese refugees arrived …

The language of citizenship: activities for ESOL learners Activity 4

    ? The Quality Improvement Agency for Lifelong Learning (‘QIA’) 2008

Why people have migrated to Britain

    Read this text to find out why each group of immigrants came to Britain

    Many people from all over the world have been coming to Britain for 2,000 years. In the 16th century the British started to explore the world and then the first Black people came to live in Britain. The numbers grew after the abolition of slavery in 1833.

    From the 17th century Britain was seen as a safe place for refugees from Europe especially for those who were running from religious violence and persecution like the Huguenots and other Protestants as well as Jews.

    During the 19th century some groups came to Britain to find work and to escape poverty. For example, Irish workers, at times starving in their own country, came and helped to build the country’s ports, canals, and railways and, later, roads. At the end of the 19th century, Jews came from Russia because, like the Huguenots two hundred years before, they were being persecuted for religious reasons.

    After the Second World War, Britain needed workers to rebuild the economy, and people were encouraged to come from the Caribbean to work in public transport, factories and the National Health Service. Immigrants from India, Pakistan and Bangladesh came to work in the textile and other industries. Many opened their own shops and restaurants all over the country. Hong Kong Chinese and refugees from Vietnam also started catering businesses.

    This long history of immigration has made Britain a very diverse country. The minority ethnic population is now over 8% of the total. Many young people from all over the world also come to Britain for a few years to work and then they go back to their own countries. They include people from America, Australia, Poland, Spain and Italy.

Adapted from www.britainusa.com

The language of citizenship: activities for ESOL learners Activity 4

    ? The Quality Improvement Agency for Lifelong Learning (‘QIA’) 2008

People from my country

    People started to come from _____________________________ to Britain in ___________________

    They left __________________ because ____________________ _____________________________________________________

    In Britain they _________________________________________ _____________________________________________________

    Now many live in _______________________________________ _____________________________________________________

    They ________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________

The language of citizenship: activities for ESOL learners Activity 4

    ? The Quality Improvement Agency for Lifelong Learning (‘QIA’) 2008

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