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The curriculum design provides the student with in-depth technical skills, breadth of technical knowledge and management skills as applied in the automotive

    Maryland CTE Program of Study

    Automotive Technician

    Secondary CTE Program of Study Proposal Form

    Maryland State Department of Education

    Division of Career Technology and Adult Learning

    200 West Baltimore Street

    Baltimore, Maryland 21201-2595

This agreement is between the Division of Career Technology and Adult Learning (DCTAL), Maryland State Department

    of Education, and the local school system listed below.

LOCAL SCHOOL SYSTEM INFORMATION Complete the information requested below, including the original

    signature of the CTE local director.

    Local School System (LSS) and Code:

    Name of CTE local director: Phone: LSS Career Cluster:

    LSS Program Title: Automotive Technician

    Pathway

    Options: 1. 2. 3. Tech Prep: yes no This program meets the criteria as a Tech Prep Program and the academic and technical course

    sequences for both secondary and postsecondary programs are attached.

     yes no Enclosed is a copy of the articulation agreement.

    Program Start Date:

    Signature of CTE Local Director: Date:

    Signature of Local Superintendent: Date:

TO BE COMPLETED BY MSDE/DCTAL

Date Program Proposal received by CTE Systems Branch:

    CTE Control Number: Fiscal Year:

    Pathway Pathway Pathway CIP Number: Program: 47.0645 Option 1: Option 2: Option 3: MSDE Cluster Title:

     Approval Starts FY: __________________

    Signature, Assistant State Superintendent, Career Technology & Adult Learning Date

    Page 1 Effective date: January 1, 2006

CTE Secondary Program Proposal Contents

    STEP 1A: PROGRAM ADVISORY COMMITTEE MEMBERS AND THEIR AFFILIATIONS

    Complete the list of the Program Advisory Committee (PAC) members. Members should include employers, local

    workforce development representatives, economic development personnel, business, or labor representatives, and the

    remainder should include secondary and postsecondary, academic and technical educators and other stakeholders.

    Place a check in the appropriate box to indicate the role each person plays. Include all of the information requested for

    each entry. Use this form or a locally developed form either one is acceptable as long as all information is provided.

    Program Advisory Committee List

    Membership: First entry should be the industry representative who is leading the PAC. PAC Leader Name: Representation: Title: Industry Secondary Postsecondary Affiliation:

    Address1:

    Address2:

    City, State, Zip: State: Zip Phone: Fax:

    Email:

    Area of Expertise:

     Work-based Learning Curriculum Development Skills Standards Validation Staff Development Role: Program Development Other (specify):

    Name: R. Terry Wolfe Representation: Title: Instructor, Automotive Technology & ETL Industry Secondary Postsecondary Affiliation: Community College of Baltimore County, Catonsville & NATEF Address1: 800 South Rolling Rd.

    Address2:

    City, State, Zip: Baltimore State: MD Zip 21288-5381 Phone: 410-455-4968 Fax: 410-455-4937 Email:

    Area of Expertise:

     Work-based Learning Curriculum Development Skills Standards Validation Staff Development Role: Program Development Other (specify):

    Name: Representation: Title: Industry Secondary Postsecondary Affiliation:

    Address1:

    Address2:

    City, State, Zip: State: Zip Phone: Fax:

    Email:

    Area of Expertise:

     Work-based Learning Curriculum Development Skills Standards Validation Staff Development Role: Program Development Other (specify):

    Page 2 Effective date: January 1, 2006

    Name: Representation: Title: Industry Secondary Postsecondary Affiliation:

    Address1:

    Address2:

    City, State, Zip: State: Zip Phone: Fax:

    Email:

    Area of Expertise:

     Work-based Learning Curriculum Development Skills Standards Validation Staff Development Role: Program Development Other (specify):

    Name: Representation: Title: Industry Secondary Postsecondary Affiliation:

    Address1:

    Address2:

    City, State, Zip: State: Zip Phone: Fax:

    Email:

    Area of Expertise:

     Work-based Learning Curriculum Development Skills Standards Validation Staff Development Role: Program Development Other (specify):

    Name: Representation: Title: Industry Secondary Postsecondary Affiliation:

    Address1:

    Address2:

    City, State, Zip: State: Zip Phone: Fax:

    Email:

    Area of Expertise:

     Work-based Learning Curriculum Development Skills Standards Validation Staff Development Role: Program Development Other (specify):

    Name: Representation: Title: Industry Secondary Postsecondary Affiliation:

    Address1:

    Address2:

    City, State, Zip: State: Zip Phone: Fax:

    Email:

    Area of Expertise:

     Work-based Learning Curriculum Development Skills Standards Validation Staff Development Role: Program Development Other (specify):

    Page 3 Effective date: January 1, 2006

STEP 1B: DOCUMENTED LABOR MARKET DEMAND Check the appropriate box below.

     Demand exists

    The PAC will review labor market information on a local, regional and/or state basis. Check this box if demand

    exists for the identified occupations. The labor market information does not need to be provided with the proposal

    as long as there is a demand for employees according to data provided by the Department of Labor, Licensing and

    Regulation (DLLR) or documented by employers in letters or other correspondence.

     If evidence for labor market demand is not readily available, attach documentation to the proposal.

    Check this box if there is a unique labor market demand for a program and data are not available from the

    Department of Labor, Licensing and Regulation (DLLR). If the occupation is new or emerging and no data exist,

    supporting evidence is submitted with the proposal (i.e. document local, national, or regional trends, local

    circumstances, or provide letters from employers or local economic/workforce development offices documenting

    employment demand including the projected number of openings by pathway).

STEP 2A: PROGRAM OVERVIEW After determining the cluster and pathway options, identify the standards

    used to develop the CTE program of study. Describe the program to be developed in detail based on what

    students are expected to know and be able to demonstrate as a result of participating in the program.

    Indicate the title and source of the skills standards for this program: National Automotive Technicians Education Foundation (NATEF)

Program Overview: The Automotive Technician CTE Program of study is an instructional program that incorporates the

    Automotive Service Excellence (ASE) program certification standards and the National Automotive Technicians Education

    Foundation (NATEF) task lists. The program prepares students for further education and careers in the Transportation

    Equipment Pathway and automotive technology. The program consists of four courses that are divided into four groups:

    Suspension and Steering (A-4), Brakes (A-5) , Electrical/Electronic Systems (A-6), and Engine Performance (A-8).

Students participating in the Auto Technician Program will understand and be able to:

    1. Develop workplace (employability) skills by demonstrating mastery of required academic and performance skills;

    2. Demonstrate the ability to perform all tasks in a safe and expedient manner;

    3. Demonstrate the ability to identify appropriate industry procedure/reference/estimation/training materials (both

    computerized and hardbound) to locate appropriate instructions and perform according to the stated guidelines;

    4. Perform all diagnostic and repair tasks in accordance with manufacturer’s recommended procedures;

    5. Develop thinking skills by analyzing, troubleshooting and solving automotive repair problems utilizing late model

    vehicles and state of the art tools and equipment (A-4, A-5, A-6, A-8);

    6. Utilize computerized equipment and software to collect and analyze fault codes and automotive operating and

    digital sending devices to isolate problem sources and perform corrective repairs (A-4, A-5, A-6, A-8);

    7. Use industry standard fault locator devices in the testing and analysis of on-board computer systems, digital

    circuitry and other digital sending devices;

    8. Troubleshoot noncode generating repair problems utilizing state-of the-art computer software and manuals to

    identify the sources of and symptoms of necessary repairs; and

    9. Work in teams to analyze and solve challenging simulated and real world repair problems utilizing late model

    vehicles and state-of-the-art diagnostic tools and equipment. Under the supervision of ASE certified technicians,

    students troubleshoot, solve and repair complex problems as members of teams and individually.

The High School will:

1. Maintain the program’s Automotive Technician NATEF Certification status (If NATEF certification is withdrawn or

    lapses, CTE program approval will be withdrawn.)

    2. Agree to require students to take the NATEF or AYES End-of Course Assessment for Suspension and Steering, Brakes,

    Electrical/Electronic Systems and Engine Performance.

    3. Complete and and obtain the necessary signatures on the articulation agreement with CCBC at Attachment 1.

    Page 4 Effective date: January 1, 2006

    STEP 2B: COURSE DESCRIPTIONS AND END OF COURSE ASSESSMENTS Insert each CTE completer course title. Describe each course based on what students are expected to know and be able to demonstrate as a result

    of their participation. Check the assessment instrument(s) that will be used to document student attainment of

    the knowledge and skills included in each course and specify additional information as appropriate.

Course Title: Suspension and Steering (A-4) (One Credit)

    Course Description:

    This course provides the student with the knowledge and skills necessary to pass the NATEF end-of-course assessment for Automobile Suspension and Steering and immediately enter a career in this area and/or attend post-secondary education and/or training. Students develop diagnostic, technical, problem-solving and academic skills through classroom instruction and hands-on maintenance applications. Through theory and real-world experiences, students master the concepts and the ability to

    research applicable vehicle and service information, collect and analyze relevant data, troubleshoot, identify, formulate proposed

    solutions to problems and perform necessary automobile suspension and steering repair tasks. Students will use state-of-the-art precision steering and alignment measurement tools and equipment to gather, analyze and make necessary repairs

Students will understand and be able to perform:

    ? Steering System Diagnosis and Repair

    ? Front Suspension Diagnosis and Repair

    ? Rear Suspension Diagnosis and Repair

    ? Related Suspension and SteeringService

    ? Wheel Alignment Diagnosis, Adjustment and Repair

    ? Wheel and Tire Diagnosis and Repair

    End of Course Assessment

Check the assessment instruments that will be used to document student attainment of the course knowledge and skills.

     Teacher-designed end-of-course assessment

     School system-designed end-of-course assessment

     Partner-developed exam: (specify)

     Licensing exam: (specify)

     Certification or credentialing exam: (specify)

     Nationally recognized examination: (specify) NATEF or AYES Suspension & Steering End-of- Course Assessment for CTE program completion (Students are required to take this.)

Course Title: Brakes (A-5) (One Credit)

    Course Description: This course provides the student with the knowledge and skills necessary to pass the NATEF end-of-course assessment for Automobile Brakes and immediately enter a career in this area and/or attend postsecondary education

    and/or training. Students develop diagnostic, technical problem-solving and academic skills through classroom instruction and

    hands-on maintenance applications. Through theory and real-world experiences, students master the concepts and the ability to

    research applicable vehicle and service information, collect and analyze relevant data, troubleshoot, identify, formulate proposed solutions to problems and perform necessary automobile brake diagnosis and repair tasks. Students will use state-of-the-art precision brake measurement tools and equipment to gather, analyze make necessary NATEF required brake repairs tasks.

    Students will understand and be able to perform:

    ? Hydrautlic System Diagnosis and Repair

    ? Drum Brake Diagnosis and Repair

    ? Disk Brake Diagnosis and Repair

    ? Power Assist Units Diagnois and Repair

    ? Miscellaneous Diagnosis and Repair: Wheel Bearings

    ? Miscellaneous Diagnosis and Repair: Parking Brakes

    ? Miscellaneous Diagnosis and Repair: Electrical Diagnosis and Repair of Brake Light Sytem

    ? Electronic Brake, Traction and Stability Control Systems Diagnosis and Repair

End of Course Assessment

    Check the assessment instruments that will be used to document student attainment of the course knowledge and skills.

     Teacher-designed end-of-course assessment

     School system-designed end-of-course assessment

     Partner-developed exam: (specify)

    Page 5 Effective date: January 1, 2006

     Licensing exam: (specify)

     Certification or credentialing exam: (specify)

     Nationally recognized examination: (specify) NATEF or AYES Brakes End-of-Course Assessment - (Students are required to take the NATEF Brakes End-of- Course Assessment for CTE program completion.)

Course Title: Electrical/Electronic Systems (A-6) (Two Credits)

    Course Description:

    This course provides the student with the knowledge and skills necessary to pass the NATEF or AYES end-of-course

    assessment for Automobile Electrical/Electronic Systems and immediately enter a career in this area and/or attend

    postsecondary education and/or training. Students develop diagnostic, technical problem-solving and academic skills through classroom instruction and hands-on maintenance applications. Through theory and real-world experiences, students master the concepts and the ability to research applicable vehicle and service information, collect and analyze relevant data, troubleshoot, identify, formulate proposed solutions to problems and perform necessary automobile electrical and electronic systems repair

    tasks. Students will use state-of-the-art precision electronic measurement tools, fault code readers and equipment to gather, analyze make necessary NATEF required electrical and electronic system repairs.

    Students will understand and be able to perform:

    ? General Electrical System Diagnosis

    ? Battery Diagnosis and Service

    ? Starting System Diagnosis and Repair

    ? Charging System Diagnosis and Repair

    ? Lighting System Diagnosis and Repair

    ? Gauge, Warning Devices and Driver Information Systems Diagnosis and Repair

    ? Horn Diagnosis and Repair

    ? Wiper/Washer Diagnosis and Repair

    ? Accessories Diagnosis and Repair

End of Course Assessment

Check the assessment instruments that will be used to document student attainment of the course knowledge and skills.

     Teacher-designed end-of-course assessment

     School system-designed end-of-course assessment

     Partner-developed exam: (specify)

     Licensing exam: (specify)

     Certification or credentialing exam: (specify)

     Nationally recognized examination: (specify) NATEF or AYES Electrical/Electronics End-of-Course Assessment - (Students

    are required to take the NATEF Electrical/Electronics End-of- Course Assessment for CTE program completion.)

Course Title: Engine Performance (A-8) One Credit)

    Course Description: This course provides the student with the knowledge and skills necessary to pass the NATEF end-of-

    course assessment for Automobile Engine Performance and immediately enter a career in this area and/or attend

    postsecondary education and/or training. Students develop diagnostic, technical problem-solving and academic skills through classroom instruction and hands-on maintenance applications. Through theory and real-world experiences, students master the concepts and the ability to research applicable vehicle and service information, collect and analyze relevant data, troubleshoot, identify, formulate proposed solutions to problems and perform necessary automobile engine performance troubleshooting and

    repair tasks. Students will use state-of-the-art precision electronic engine performance measurement tools, fault code readers and equipment to gather, analyze make necessary NATEF required engine performance repairs.

    Students will understand and be able to perform:

    ? Engine Related Service

    ? General Engine Diagnosis

    ? Computerized Engine Controls Diagnosis and Repair

    ? Ignition System Diagnosis and Repair

    ? Fuel Systems Diagnosis and Repair

    ? Air Induction System Diagnosis and Repair

    ? Exhaust System Diagnosis and Repair

    Page 6 Effective date: January 1, 2006

    ? Emission Control System Diagnosis and Repair: Positive Crankcase Ventilation System

    ? Emission Control System Diagnosis and Repair: Exhaust Gas Recirculation System ? Emission Control System Diagnosis and Repair: Secondary Air Injection (AIR) and Catalytic Converter, Emission Control

    System Diagnosis and Repair: Evaporative Emission Controls

End of Course Assessment

Check the assessment instruments that will be used to document student attainment of the course knowledge and skills.

     Teacher-designed end-of-course assessment

     School system-designed end-of-course assessment

     Partner-developed exam: (specify)

     Licensing exam: (specify)

     Certification or credentialing exam: (specify)

     Nationally recognized examination: (specify) NATEF or AYES Engine Performance End- of- Course Assessment for CTE Program Completion Students are required to take the assessment.

STEP 2C: END-OF-PROGRAM ASSESSMENT - Check the assessment instruments that will be used to document

    student attainment of the program knowledge and skills. Include and identify assessments leading to industry

    recognized credentials if available and appropriate.

     Teacher-designed end-of-program assessment

     School system-designed end-of-program assessment

     Partner-developed exam: (specify)

     Licensing exam: (specify)

     Certification or credentialing exam: (specify)

     Nationally recognized examination: (specify)

    Page 7 Effective date: January 1, 2006

STEP 2D: Program Sequence Matrix (Include the program sequences for High School, Associate’s Degree, and

    Bachelor’s Degree programs)

    Identify the pathway options. Complete the program matrix for the 9-12 program, plus, for Tech Prep programs

    include the matrix for the two- or four-year college program of study. Indicate which courses receive CTE

    credit by placing the number of credits in parentheses after each CTE course title. Place an asterisk (*) next to

    the course identified as the concentrator course indicating that the student has completed 50% of the program.

The program matrix defines a planned, sequential program of study that consists of a minimum of four credits in CTE

    coursework including work-based learning and/or industry-mentored projects. Work-based learning experiences or

    industry-mentored projects must be included in the program to obtain approval. The program matrix includes the

    recommended academic and CTE courses identified for the pathway and postsecondary linkages (i.e., dual enrollment,

    Tech Prep, transcripted and articulated credit).

    CTE programs typically begin after ninth grade and do not include career exploration courses. Courses such as computer

    applications and keyboarding are not included in the completer sequence because they provide prerequisite skills for both

    academic courses and CTE programs. Academic courses are counted only if they are tailored to serve mainly CTE

    students and have been revised to reflect industry skill standards. Technology Education or Advanced Technology

    Education courses are not acceptable for credit in the career and technology education program sequence.

    CIP Number Automotive Technician 47.0645 Pathway/Program: (For MSDE Use) Graduation Grade 9 Grade 10 Grade 11 Grade 12 Requirements

     English - 4 English 9English 10English 11English 12

     Social Studies - 3 US GovernmentWorld HistoryUS History

     Mathematics - 3 Algebra 1GeometryAlgebra 2

     Science - 3 Physical ScienceBiologyChemistry

     Physical Education -.5 .5 PE.5 Health Health Education - .5

     Fine Arts - 1 .5 Fine Arts.5 Fine Arts

    Technology Education Technology - 1 Education

     Suspension and *Electronic/Electrical CTE Completer Steering (1) Systems (2) Program 5 Brakes (1) Engine Performance (1) *concentrator course (**WBL)

     Foreign Language - 2 Spanish 1Spanish 2 and/or Advanced Tech Ed - 2

    Provide a list of examples of careers students are preparing to enter and postsecondary options: Automobile Service Tech, Automobile Master Mechanic, Automobile Speciality Tech, Electronic Equipment Installer &

    Repairer - motor vehicle.

     nd* Concentrator course is the 2 course in the sequence. ***Work-Based Learning (WBL) is an integral component of the program. WBL should be incorporated into the program dependent upon LSS delivery system (i.e. integrated or capstone WBL experience).

    Page 8 Effective date: January 1, 2006

    Two Year College Program Sequence Program Overview (for Tech Prep Programs only) Many local school systems provide postsecondary matrices in their program of study guides to inform students, parents, and counselors of the opportunities available to those enrolled in the program. Section 2E must be

    completed before a program is identified as Tech Prep. A copy of the Tech Prep Articulation Agreement is

    required to be submitted with the proposal prior to program approval. (See Attachment 1)

Describe the program to be developed in detail based on what students are expected to know and be able to

    demonstrate as a result of participating in the program.

    CCBC, Catonsville offers an Associate of Applied Science Degree - 70 hrs required - Upon completion of the Automobile Technology curriculum, students may transfer to a B.S. degree program in transportation at Pennsylvania College of

    Technology, enter the job market as well-prepared, high-level collision repair technicians or entrepreneurs.

Program Title: Automotive Technology, Certificate or AAS

    College/Institution: Community College of Baltimore County-Catonsville

Recommended Sequence Complete the program matrix for the postsecondary sequence for the Tech Prep

    program of study. Indicate which courses receive articulated or transcripted credit by PLACING THE NUMBER

    OF CREDITS IN PARENTHESES after each course title.

Semester 1 Semester 2

    AUTO 101 Heating & AC Systems 3 AUTO 151 Automatic Transmissions 4 AUTO 126 Brake Systems (4) AUTO 141 Engines & Related Systems (5) AUTO 131 Electrical, Suspension, Electronic Systems (5) AUTO 156 Manual Transmissions 4 SPCM 101 Fundamentals of Speech 3 CINS 101 Computer Information Technology 3 Semester 3 Semester 4

     AUTO 231 Reparing Automobile Engines 5 AUTO 171 Repairing Automobile Suspension Systems (4) AUTO 241 Repairing Automobile Engine-Related Systems 4 AUTO 136 Repairing Automobile Electrical Syatems 3 SOCL 141 Racial & Cultural Minorities 3 AUTO 161 Repariing Automobile Electronics 5 General Education Electives 9-10 ENGL 101 Craft of Composition 3 The 18 hours in ( ) indicate articulated credt based on successfully passing LSS Auto Tech Fast Track program with B or better and with an Instructor Recommendation or sucessfully passing the four corresponding ASE Certification exams.

    Provide a list of examples of careers students are preparing to enter: Automobile lead technicians, automobile team

    leaders, automobile service advisors, diagnosticians or secure upper-level automobile positions.

Four Year College Program Sequence Program Overview (for Tech Prep Programs)

    Complete this matrix if the program includes a four year degree option.

Many local school systems provide postsecondary matrices in their program of study guides to inform students,

    parents, and counselors of the opportunities available to those enrolled in the program. Section 2E must be

    completed before a program is identified as Tech Prep. . A copy of the Tech Prep Articulation Agreement is

    required to be submitted with the proposal prior to program approval.

Describe the program to be developed in detail based on what students are expected to know and be able to

    demonstrate as a result of participating in the program.

    Program Title: B.S. Degree in Transportation

    College/Institution: Pennsylvania College of Technology

    Page 9 Effective date: January 1, 2006

Recommended Sequence Complete the program matrix for the postsecondary sequence for the Tech Prep

    program of study. Indicate which courses receive articulated or transcripted credit by placing the number of

    credits in parentheses after each course title.

    Semester 1 Semester 2

(See Attachment 2)

    Semester 3 Semester 4

Provide a list of examples of careers students are preparing to enter:

    Management positions I customer relations, credit and finance, personnel, sales, marketing, inventory control and fleet

    manager.

STEP 2E: VALUE-ADDED OPTIONS Fill in the name of the partnering college or agency. Specify the credential

    that students will earn. Under value-added, indicate the number of credits or hours granted. This information is

    required before a program can be designated as Tech Prep.

    Option Partner Credential Value added for CTE

    completers

    CCBC Catonsville Certificate Program or AAS * Up to 15 Credit Semester Dual Enrollment

    in Automobile Technology Hours Transcripted

     Transcripted Credit

    CCBC Catonsville Certificate Program or AAS Up to 18 Credit Hours Articulated Credit

    in Automobile Technology earned for successfully

    passing an LSS CTE

    program of study with a B

    or better and an

    instructor’s

    recommendation

    CCBC Catonsville Certificate Program or AAS Up to 18 Credit Hours Credit by Exam

    in Automobile Technology Earned for successfully

    passing four ASE

    Certification Exams

     Advanced Placement

    Apprenticeship Approved by MATC**

    Certification(s) License Degree Other (specify) *To obtain credit for Automobile Technology Courses through Dual enrollment, the High School Instructor must be

    accepted as CCBC Adjunct Professor or students must take the course at CCBC and students must pay discounted Dual

    Enrollment Tuition fee

    **MD Apprenticeship and Training Council

    Page 10 Effective date: January 1, 2006

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