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book1bb

By Julia Hawkins,2014-05-10 18:35
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book1bb

    Book1bb

     1 I haven’t been able to be outdoors for so long that

     2 everything to do with nature. I can well remember that

     3 a deep blue sky, the song of the birds, moonlight and flowers

     4 kept me spellbound. 5 since I was here.

    For example, one evening 6, I stayed awake on purpose until half past eleven in order to have a good look at the moon by myself. But as the moon gave far

    too much light, I 7. Another time five months ago, I 8 at dusk

    when the window was open. I didn’t go downstairs until the window had to be shut.

    The dark, rainy evening, the wind, the thundering clouds held me entirely in their power; 9 in a year and a half 10 seen the night face to face

    SadlyI am only able to look at nature through dirty curtains

    11 . It’s no pleasure looking through these any longer because 12

     that really must be experienced.

    As you sit in silence, Burdens are lighter

     13 15,

    I’ll be your shoulder 14 And I just want you to knowUntil your tears run dry. I’m here for you.

    thAt the end of the 16 century, about five to seven million people spoke English. Nearly all of them lived in England. Later in the next century, people from England

    made voyages to 16 and because of that, English began

     17 in many other countries. Today, more people speak English as their first,

    second or a foreign language than ever before.

    Why 18 over time? Actually all languages change and develop when 19 and communicate with each other. At first the English spoken in England between

    about AD 450 and 1150 was very different from the English spoken today. It was

    based more on German 21 we speak 22. Then gradually between about AD 800 and 1150, English became less like German because 23 spoke first

    Danish and later French. These new settlers enriched the English language

    th24. So in the 18 century some Shakespeare was able to 25 than ever

    before. In 1620 some British settlers moved to America. Later 26 some

    British people were taken to Australia too. English began to be spoken 27.

    thFinally by the 19 century the language was settled. At that time two big changes

     28 happened: first Samuel Johnson wrote his dictionary 29

    1

     Noah Webster wrote The American Dictionary of the English Language. 30

     gave a separate identity to American English spelling.

    English now is also spoken as a foreign or second language in South Asia. 31, India

    has a very large number of 32 because Britain ruled India from 1765 to1947. During that time English became the language for government and education.

    English is also spoken in Singapore and Malaysia and countries in Africa such as

    South Africa. Today 33 learning English in China is increasing rapidly. In

    fact, China may 34 of English learners. Will Chinese English develop its own identity? 35.

    Ever since middle school, my sister Wang Wei and I have dreamed about 36 .

    They are Dai and 37 Province near the Lancang River,

     38 that is called the Mekong River in other countries.

    It was my sister who first had the idea 39 Mekong River from where it begins to where it ends.

    Although she didn’t know 40, she insisted that

     41 properly.

    She 42 the kind that said she would not 43.

    It becomes rapids as it 44, travelling across western Yunnan Province.As it enters Southeast Asia, its pace slows. It 45wide bends or meanders through low valleys to the plains 46.

    I had some medical training at my college. Besides, we are 47 to cover any problems.

    Strange things were happening in the countryside of northeast Hebei. In the city, the

    water pipes in some buildings 48. But the one million people of the city, who 49 these events, were asleep as usual that night. At 3:42 am everything began to shake. 50 the world was at an end! Eleven kilometers directly below the city the greatest earthquake of 51 had begun. In fifteen terrible seconds 52 .

    The suffering of the people

     53. Two-thirds of them died or were injured during the earthquake. Thousands of families were killed and many children 54 . The number of people 55 reached more than 400000. 90% of the city’s homes 56. However, 57.

    58, the army sent 150000 soldiers to Tangshan to help 59. They organized teams to dig out those who were trapped and to bury 60 . To the north of the city,

    Book1bb

    most of the 10000 miners were rescued from the coal mines there. Workers built

    shelters for survivors 61 . Fresh water was taken to the city by train, truck

    and plane. Slowly, 62 again.

    I wish to 63 the great efforts the soldiers made 64

     during that terrible disaster.

    No words are strong enough 65 to the heroes.

    Listening to English is a very important skill because 66 we understand

    67 we can have a conversation with somebody.

    A man who 68 is already 69 what he fears.

    It was in 1952 and Mandela was the black lawyer 70 . He offered guidance to poor black people 71 . He was generous with his time,

     72. However, this was a time when one 73 have a passbook to live in Johannesburg.

    The last thirty years have seen the greatest number of laws stopping our rights and

    progress, until today we 74 where we have almost no rights at all.

    We were put into a position i 75 we were less important, or fight the

    government. We chose to attack the laws. We first broke the law in a way which was peaceful; only when this was not allowed did we decide to 76He taught us 77 and evenings when we 78 .

    They said that the job and the pay from the south African government were my

    reward 79 for the Blacks.

    Increasing poverty has 80 the poorest openly admit that they cannot afford to have children.

    3

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