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Six Ribbons

By Gilbert Hughes,2014-01-11 08:00
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Six Ribbons

Six Ribbons

    If I were a minstrel

    I’d sing you six love songsTo tell the whole world of the love that we share

    If I were a merchant

    I’d bring you six diamondsWith six blood-red rosesFor my love to wear

    But I am a simple manA poor common farmer

    I gave you six ribbonsTo tie back your hairIf I were a noble manI’d give you six carriagesWith six snow-white horseTo take you anywhere

    If I were the emperorI’d give you six palacesWith six hundred servantsFor comforting care

    But I am a simple manA poor common farmer

    I gave you six ribbonsTo tie back your hairSo be not afraid my loveYou’re never alone loveWhile you wear my ribbonsTying back your hair

    Once I was a simple manA poor common farmer

    I gave you six ribbonsTo tie back your hairCompiled by Mike Smith ACE - 1 -

    Adapted from Six Ribbons, John English and Mario Millar

Vocabulary

    WordMeaning

    minstrel (n)(old english)

    musicianmerchant (n)(old and new english, but not very common now)

    someone who sells things

    shopkeeper

    trader

    blood-red (adj)describing the colour of something as red like bloodmy love (n ph)(in this context) the person who I love

    (also) my feeling of lovesimple (adj) (in this context) describing someone as uneducated

    (also) describing anything as not complex, uncomplicatedcommon (adj)(in this context) describing someone as not special

    (also) describing something as not specialribbon (n)long thin piece of fabricnoble (adj, n)(in this context) describing a person as being very important

    and rich, usually of high status by birth and family

    (also) describing a person or animal as having strong and

    honest charactercarriage (n)transportation pulled by horsesnow-white (adj)describing the colour of something as white like snowemperor (n)usually used in eastern cultures as synonym for king, but

    sometimes also in western cultures.palace (n)home of royalty - king, queen, emperorservant (n)a person who serves another personcomforting (adj)describing something as making you feel betterbe not (v)(old english grammar) don’t beafraid (adj)scared, frightenedalone (adj)no other people near, by yourselflove (n)(in this context) a person being lovedtying back (adj ph)gerund form of phrasal verb – to tie back, used as adjectiveCompiled by Mike Smith ACE - 2 -

    Adapted from Six Ribbons, John English and Mario Millar

    Vocabulary

    WordMeaning

    (old english)

    musician

    (old and new english, but not very common now)someone who sells things

    shopkeeper

    trader

    describing the colour of something as red like blood(in this context) the person who I love

    (also) my feeling of love

    (in this context) describing someone as uneducated(also) describing anything as not complex, uncomplicated(in this context) describing someone as not special(also) describing something as not special

    long thin piece of fabric

    (in this context) describing a person as being very important and rich, usually of high status by birth and family(also) describing a person or animal as having strong and honest character

    transportation pulled by horse

    describing the colour of something as white like snowusually used in eastern cultures as synonym for king, but sometimes also in western cultures.

    home of royalty - king, queen, emperor

    a person who serves another person

    describing something as making you feel better(old english grammar) don’t be

    scared, frightened

    no other people near, by yourself

    (in this context) a person being loved

    gerund form of phrasal verb – to tie back, used as adjective

    Compiled by Mike Smith ACE - 3 -

    Adapted from Six Ribbons, John English and Mario Millar

Vocabulary Focus

    Six Ribbons

    If I were a __________

    I’d sing you six love songsTo tell the _______ _______of the love that we share

    If I were a __________

    I’d bring you six diamondsWith six __________rosesFor my love to wear

    But I am a __________manA poor __________farmerI gave you six ribbons

    To tie back your hair

    If I were a __________ manI’d give you six __________With six snow-white horseTo take you anywhere

    If I were the __________I’d give you six __________With six hundred __________For comforting care

    But I am a __________ manA poor __________ farmerI gave you six ribbons

    To tie back your hair

    So ______ ______ afraid my loveYou’re never __________ loveWhile you wear my ribbonsTying back your hair

    Once I was a simple manA poor common farmer

    I gave you six ribbons

    To tie back your hair

    Compiled by Mike Smith ACE - 4 -

    Adapted from Six Ribbons, John English and Mario Millar

Grammar Focus

    Six Ribbons

    ________________ a minstrel_________ you six love songs___________ the whole world of the love that we share

    ____________ a merchant

    ____________ you six diamondsWith six blood-red rosesFor my love _________

    But I am a simple man

    A poor common farmer

    ___________ you six ribbons___________ back your hair___________ a noble man

    ___________ you six carriagesWith six snow-white horse___________ you anywhere___________ the emperor

    ___________ you six palacesWith six hundred servantsFor ______________

    But I am a simple man ...So be not afraid my love_______________ love

    _______________ my ribbonsTying back your hair

    Once I was a simple man

    A poor common farmer

    ___________ you six ribbons___________ back your hairCompiled by Mike Smith ACE - 5 -

    Adapted from Six Ribbons, John English and Mario Millar

Grammar Spot

    If (were for unreal situation) then (would for unreal outcome – promise in this example)

    Usually we use present simple of be to talk about a situation in present time, for example:

    Iam

    Youarea farmer.He/sheis

    We

    You (plural)arefarmers.They

    But if this situation is unreal and part of a conditional grammar structure (if A then B) then

    we backshift to were for all persons singular and plural.

    I

    Ifyouwerea minstrel, then ...

    he/she

    we

    Ifyou (plural)wereminstrels, then ...

    they

    Sometimes people use was for the singular instead of were, but were is more correct. The reason is that this is a special tense called Subjunctive, which only affects the verb to be.

    For all other verbs in unreal situations, we use the Past Simple:

    I

    Ifyouwonthe lottery, then ...

    he/she

    Usually we use will for a certain outcome (for example a promise in this song), but if this is

    part of an unreal situation then we backshift will to would.unreal situation unreal promise

    If I were a minstrel,thenI would sing ...

    This grammar structure is very useful when you talk about hypothetical situations, or you

    want to make a big promise that you know you won’t have to keep. Great for romance.

    Backshifting is used in English for these situations:

    distance from real time (past time)

    distance from speaker (reported speech)

    distance from certainty or reality (conditionals)

    distance from assumption of compliance (politeness)

    These backshifts can add for combinations for example:

    unreal situation in the pastunreal promise in the past

    If I had been a minstrel,thenI would have sung a love songCompiled by Mike Smith ACE - 6 -

    Adapted from Six Ribbons, John English and Mario Millar

    Dictogloss

    Six Ribbons

    If I were a minstrel

    I’d sing you six love songs

    To tell the whole world of the love that we shareIf I were a merchant

    I’d bring you six diamonds

    With six blood-red roses

    For my love to wear

    But I am a simple man

    A poor common farmer

    I gave you six ribbons

    To tie back your hair

    Compiled by Mike Smith ACE - 7 -

    Adapted from Six Ribbons, John English and Mario Millar

    Dictogloss

    Six Ribbons

    verbsnounsother words

    were I minstrelIf a sing I you songs’d six love tell shareworld love weTo the whole of the that were I merchantIf a bring I you diamonds’d six

    rosesWith six blood-red wear

    love For my love to am

    I manBut a simple

    farmerA poor common gave

    I you ribbonssix tie

    hairTo back your Compiled by Mike Smith ACE - 8 -

    Adapted from Six Ribbons, John English and Mario Millar

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