DOC

The Roy H. Park Leadership Fellows Program at the Johnson School

By Julie Martin,2014-03-26 16:30
7 views 0
The operating framework is that leadership is learned and not taught, Michael Reuttgers, CEO of EMC. Wendy Kopp, Founder, Teach for America

The Roy H. Park Leadership Fellows Program at the Johnson

    School at Cornell University:

     A New Paradigm for Developing Socially Responsible

    Business Leaders in Management Education

    A Paper Submitted for the

    Global Forum

    “Business as an Agent of World Benefit:

    Management Knowledge Leading Positive Change”

    October 22-25, 2006

    By

    C. Clinton Sidle

C. Clinton Sidle is the director of the Roy H. Park Leadership Fellows Program and The

    Johnson School at Cornell University and a top consultant in strategic change,

    teambuilding, leadership development, and executive coaching. His particular emphasis

    is in developing values-driven, socially responsible organizational and business cultures.

    Many of the tools and techniques used in his work are described in his book The

    Leadership Wheel: Five Steps for Achieving Personal and Organizational Greatness by

    Palgrave Macmillan.

    The Roy H. Park Leadership Fellows Program at the Johnson School - Cornell

    University:

     A New Paradigm for Developing Socially Responsible Business Leaders in

    Management Education

    C. Clinton Sidle

    Table of Contents

    I. Abstract ................................................................................................................................... 3

    II. Executive Summary ................................................................................................................... 4

    III. Program Description ................................................................................................................. 6

     Program Philosophy ............................................................................................................... 6

     Action Learning Process.................................................................................................. 8

     Self-Directed Change ....................................................................................................... 8

     The Leadership Development Curriculum and Syllabus ................................................... 9

     Curriculum Overview ...................................................................................................... 9

     Syllabus and Development Sequence .......................................................................... 11

     Roy H. Park Speaker Series ................................................................................................. 13

     The Service Leadership Projects ......................................................................................... 14

     Overview ......................................................................................................................... 14

     Class of 2006 Projects .................................................................................................... 15

     The Social Networking Program ........................................................................................ 16

     The Alumni Program ........................................................................................................... 17

    IV. Evolution of Program ............................................................................................................. 17

V. Program Outcomes Assessment ............................................................................................ 19

     Internal Evaluations ............................................................................................................. 19

     Alumni Evaluations .............................................................................................................. 19

     Careers ................................................................................................................................. 20

     The Leadership Focus .......................................................................................................... 20

VI. Strategies for Developing Similar Programs ........................................................................ 21

    VII. Contact Information ............................................................................................................... 21

AppendixThe Johnson Leadership Competency Model ......................................................... 22

     2

I. ABSTACT

    The Roy H. Park Leadership Fellows Program at The Johnson School at Cornell University is a full tuition fellowship funded by the Triad Foundation program that is designed to attract and develop socially responsible business leaders for tomorrow. The Program was founded in 1997 on a leadership theme and awards up to 25 fellowships per class to students entering the two-year MBA experience. It is based on a philosophy that leadership is not only about professional achievement but also about personal contribution about doing

    well for oneself while doing good in the world.

    The program offers a powerful leadership development program designed to deliver on this philosophical premise, and is unique in graduate management education. In addition to their regular MBA experience, the Park Fellows participate in a two-year development sequence that they do as a cohort. This sequence is based four areas of mastery personal,

    interpersonal, team, system and contextual for developing socially responsible business

    leaders:

    To drive home this message of the program, each Park Fellow is required to make a significant public-service contribution to the Johnson School, or the surrounding community through Service Leadership Projects. These projects serve as a capstone experience in their second year that provides them with an opportunity to practice their leadership skills, integrate the perspectives of diverse disciplines, and develop an enduring commitment to public service. The projects focus on making service improvements and program enhancements in the local community.

    There are a number of important features which in combination make this a unique and powerful program. It offers and new a new paradigm for management education for developing the soft skills of leadership and shows real potential for grooming future business leaders serving as agents of world benefit. Features include:

    ? Service Leadership Philosophy

    ? Two Year Developmental Sequence

    ? Cohort of Learning Partners

    ? Constant Cycle of Experiential Learning and Reflection

    ? Program of Self-Directed Change

    ? Developmental Tracking and Measurement

    ? Service Leadership Projects

    In summary the program takes the best of what we know about leadership development and frames it around creating positive change in the world. The outcomes are promising (see outcomes assessment in the report).

     3

    II. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

The Roy H. Park Leadership Fellows Program at The Johnson School at Cornell University

    is a full tuition fellowship funded by the Triad Foundation program that is designed to

    attract and develop socially responsible business leaders for tomorrow. The Program was

    founded in 1997 on a leadership theme and awards up to 25 fellowships per class to students

    entering the two-year MBA experience. It is based on a philosophy that leadership is not

    only about professional achievement but also about personal contribution about doing

    well for oneself while doing good in the world.

The Program offers a powerful leadership development program designed to deliver on this

    philosophical premise, and is unique in graduate management education. In addition to their

    regular MBA experience, the Park Fellows participate in a two-year development sequence

    that they do as a cohort. This sequence is based four areas of mastery for developing socially

    responsible business leaders:

    Personal Mastery. The ability to know oneself, learn from experience, and serve life

    fulfilling goals.

    Interpersonal Mastery. The ability to communicate and work well with others,

    particularly in difficult conversations, in a way that respects the relationship and

    promotes mutual learning.

    Team Mastery. The ability to develop and lead groups of individuals towards

    common goals while promoting a healthy environment.

    Systems Mastery and Contextual Mastery. The ability to think systemically and

    lead and organization through a strategic change process in a way that develops

    commitment, learning, and socially responsible actions.

To drive home the philosophical message of the program, each Park Fellow is required to

    make a significant public service contribution to the Johnson School, or the surrounding

    community through Service Leadership Projects. These projects serve as a capstone

    experience in their second year that provides them with an opportunity to practice their

    leadership skills, integrate the perspectives of diverse disciplines, and develop an enduring

    commitment to public service. The projects focus on making service improvements and

    program enhancements in the local community. Some of the 2006 projects include:

    Lingua, LLC: A pre-K and elementary school language training program launched

    by the Fellows.

    Future Stars Partnership: A day college immersion program that brings

    underrepresented high school students from NYC to Cornell for learning about

    college.

     4

    Home Regenerations: A non-profit start-up launched by the Fellows to refurbish

    homes for low income families.

There are a number of important features which in combination make this a unique and

    powerful program. It offers and new a new paradigm for management education for

    developing the soft skills of leadership and shows real potential for grooming future business

    leaders serving as agents of world benefit.

    Service Leadership Philosophy. The philosophical premise of the program is that

    leadership is a particular way of approaching life and work, one that is dedicated to

    human fulfillment for both self and others. As such the program goes beyond simple

    techniques and delves into questions of personal authenticity, influence, and service.

    Two Year Developmental Sequence. As briefly described above (more detail

    below), the program focuses on developing the softer skills of personal,

    interpersonal, team, and system mastery which often underemphasized in

    management education but is highly valued in business.

    Cohort of Learning Partners. The Fellows travel through this program as a cohort:

    learning and practicing the skills together, giving and receiving feedback on progress,

    and serving as coaches for one another. As a result, strong relationships,

    interpersonal networks, and program cohesion and momentum develop.

    Constant Cycle of Experiential Learning and Reflection. The program is

    designed around the action-learning framework of David Kolb. Fellows are

    presented with theoretical material, given opportunities to practice the skills, receive

    feedback on their efforts, and work with coaches on reflecting on the lessons learned.

    Program of Self-Directed Change. Leadership is not taught, it is learned, so the

    program is self-directed. The Fellows develop personalized learning plans based on

    individual assessments and then follow through with the support of peer coaches.

    Thus the Program is designed to first inspire, and then to support personal change..

    Developmental Tracking and Measurement. The Fellows use their entire

    spectrum of their MBA experience as a practice field for developing their skills

    including participating in school clubs, volunteer events and community activities,

    and periodically receive formal feedback from peers, clients and others on their

    progress.

    Service Leadership Projects. As mentioned above, the Service Leadership Projects

    serve as a capstone experience for integrating skills and developing an enduring

    commitment to public service and socially responsible business.

In summary the program takes the best of what we know about leadership development

    and frames it around creating positive change in the world. The outcomes are promising

    (see outcomes assessment in the report).

     5

III. PROGRAM DESCRIPTION

1. THEORETICAL OVERVIEW

There are five primary components of the leadership development program. The first is

    the leadership development curriculum consisting of a series of workshops and

    experiences that provide an understanding of leadership theory and practice. The second

    is access to senior executives and global leaders where Park Fellows serve as hosts to

    some of the most influential thought leaders and corporate executives in the world. The

    third is The Service Leadership Project, where Park Fellows are expected to initiate,

    manage, and complete projects that will contribute to a meaningful, permanent change in

    the Johnson School, or Ithaca communities. The fourth is a social networking component

    that consists of a series of admissions, alumni, and interclass events designed to establish

    a network among all Park Fellows, and promote the program as a tradition. Finally, the

    fifth is the alumni program designed provide a lifelong support to alumni through

    developing social and professional networks and programs.

    Program Philosophy. The program is based on an overall philosophy of attracting and developing socially responsible business leaders. This philosophy is characterized by two

    constant themes. First is the idea that leadership is not only about professional achievement but also about personal contribution it is about doing well for oneself while doing good in

    the world. Leadership is a process that allows individuals to transcend self-interest to care,

    respect, and serve in ways that both reward the individual as well as make a positive

    contribution to society.

The second theme is diversity, and the notion of leadership as being ―from all walks of life,

    into all walks of life.‖ The kind of leadership espoused in the first theme can manifest in any

    industry and any sector of the economy. The world of today requires this kind of leadership

    on all fronts. Thus the career interests of the Fellows reflect the richness of this potential.

    The Program attracts the full spectrum of MBA candidates, and serves as a model for other

    management programs to emulate.

Building on this foundation, the leadership development program has been shaped around

    four levels of the leadership experience and mastery.

    Personal Mastery. Personal mastery is the discipline of continually clarifying and

    deepening a personal vision for life, and focusing energies on what is most important.

    All great leaders stand for something. They are grounded in a value system, sense of

    purpose, or a cause that inspires them to act, and makes them authentic and real for

    others. People with a high level of personal mastery learn how to learn, and live in a

    continual learning mode. They never ‗arrive‘ as they view their development as a

    lifelong discipline. They are aware of their strengths and growth areas, and that

    provides them with the motivation to continue to grow and develop. This awareness

    also brings them self-confidence as they learn to play to their strengths while

    managing their weaknesses. The Program experience shows, that as the Fellows investigate

     6

    all discover that they want to do good in the world. The Program then supports these questions, they

    them in following through on that aspiration.

    Interpersonal Mastery: Interpersonal mastery is the ability to communicate and

    work well in relationship with others. Effective leaders, regardless of their position

    of formal authority, are able to influence and motivate others to act on common

    goals. They are good communicators who are able to tackle difficult issues openly

    including managing conflict and delivering constructive feedback in ways that are

    respectful and supportive. Above all they are good at relationships. Relationships are

    built in part from bridging the gap of different perceptions people have about the

    world. Effective leaders are willing and prepared to address those differences, to

    learn from one another, and come to a unified perception of the reality of the

    situation. As leaders, the Fellows learn to treat people as people as opposed to objects to be

    manipulated. This promotes learning and healthier relationships

    Team Mastery: Team mastery is the process of aligning and developing the capacity

    of a team to create the results its members truly desire. When teams learn together,

    not only are there good results for the organization, but members also grow in way

    that they would not have otherwise. To be successful, leaders must learn to shape teams in

    ways that tap the talents and aspirations of all and align them so that the whole becomes greater

    than the sum of the individual parts. They must also learn to shape the team culture in

    ways that enables it to act in spontaneous yet coordinated ways. They develop an

    operational trust where each team member remains conscious and respectful of the

    others while being counted on to act in ways that complement the actions of the

    different parts.

    Systems and Contextual Mastery: At the heart of all successful and fast changing

    organizations is the ability to grasp the big picture and view the organization as a

    system and the system, or context, of which it is part. Effective leaders see

    organizations as dynamic processes, and are able to shape and lead them through

    strategic change. Leaders thrive in a world of increasing interdependency and change,

    and are able to get results by working through the system and in the context of their

    environment. They know that whatever their system does, its elements and surrounding

    environment are also connected and interdependent with that process. So to survive and endure, they

    must be sensitive and responsible to these interdependencies, whether they are social, environmental,

    or economic.

Personal mastery is the foundation of this sequence and the key for instilling a sense of

    socially responsible business and using business for generating positive change. It is

    addressed early on in the two year experience and periodically revisited afterwards, and the

    lessons are carried through and applied in the subsequent levels. During the initial immersion

    into the topic, the Fellows are asked to write a personal mission, vision and values statement representing both

    their professional and personal lives. Without exception, over the course of 8 years of experience, all the

    Fellows want to do good in the world. The subsequent topics show them how, and the remaining structure and

    support systems built into the program hold them accountable to their commitments.

In this sense the development process proceeds from the inside-out. The Fellows first

    address questions of who they are as a person and what do they want to contribute to the

    world, and then learn the more technical skills for how to manifest that in the subsequent

     7

levels. Over the course of two years, there is a real opportunity to instill change, and to

    develop new attitudes and patterns of behavior.

Action Learning Process: The program is based on self-directed change process for

    developing leadership competencies that the research shows to be most related to those who

    successfully rise to the top. Park Fellows are evaluated on these competencies through

    various peer and self-assessment mechanisms, guided in developing a personalized learning

    plan based on that assessment, provided with theory and skill-development training to help

    address areas of desired development, and finally, given opportunities to grow and practice

    skills throughout their MBA experience.

This is approach is commonly known as action learning, and it combines assessment, theory,

    practice, and reflection in a robust learning and development cycle. Action learning links

    leadership development to immediate business and personal concerns by challenging

    participants to practice skills in real world activities. We believe the keys to success of this

    approach are:

    ? Individualized assessment and development

    ? Interpersonal support for exploration

    ? Opportunities to experiment, practice, and learn

    ? Use of all of the experiences at the school as opportunities for learning

The program curriculum is designed as a two-year experience of leadership development

    based on this action learning process. The basic concept of the program is a Feedback

    Reflection Theory Practice learning cycle modeled after the work of David Kolb that is

    repeated as much as possible over the two years at the school, and designed to assess and

    develop the leadership competencies of the Johnson School Leadership Competency Model

    (see appendix). This cycle takes full advantage of the complete range of opportunities for

    action learning, or practice fields, including classes, clubs, and Service Leadership Projects

    available through The Johnson School.

Self-Directed Change. As mentioned above, this action learning process is self-directed.

    The operating framework is that leadership is learned and not taught, so the program is

    based on the premise of instilling a ―yearn to learn‖ rather a ―tug to teach.‖ Developing

    leadership is like learning how to swim, we can acquire all the theory about how to swim but

    only learn after we jump in. This takes motivation and initiative. The program provides a fair

     8

amount of structure and theory, but places the onus on the student to seek experiences,

    challenges, and learning opportunities to foster their own growth. The Program Director

    serves as a guide rather than a teacher, and is there to help coach and support this process,

    but responsibility for learning and taking action remains with the student.

This approach is summarized by the following principles of self-directed emphasized

    throughout the program.

    1. Have a model of leadership (what do you aspire to be)

    2. Get feedback on that model (how you are doing relative to that ideal).

    3. Evaluate that feedback (what rings true).

    4. Make a plan for learning and change (how you plan to learn).

    5. Work the plan (how you execute and follow through on the plan).

2. THE LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT CURRICULUM AND SYLLABUS

Curriculum Overview: The approach described above serves as the framework for the

    design of the leadership development curriculum for the Park Fellows Program. It is an

    action learning process, designed as a developmental series of workshops and classroom

    activities that takes students through the personal, interpersonal, team, and systems levels of

    leadership experience, and applies the competencies of the leadership model at each level.

    There is a special emphasis on the Personal Mastery component due to its central

    importance in the leadership model and the philosophy of the program.

Outlined below are the key components of this two-year curriculum:

    1. Foundations in Leadership During the orientation week, just before fall semester

    classes begin, students attend this course on personal assessment. The course uses

    feedback from the Johnson School 360-degree assessment (based on the Johnson

    School Leadership Competency Model again, see appendix), as well as from other

    instruments and simulations, to evaluate current leadership strengths and weaknesses.

    The Fellows use this assessment to establish a personalized learning plan that will be

    revised periodically and provides the framework for continually developing

    leadership skills throughout the 2-year MBA experience.

    2. Personal Coaching. At the beginning of each semester, Park Fellows will meet with

    the Program Director for additional coaching and support on learning plans, and to

    ensure Fellows are positioned to maximize the benefits of their experience. As part

    of this dialogue, the Fellows will work with the Director in developing and following

    through on a plan to ensure they are on track for meeting the program expectations.

    Park Fellows are also encouraged to seek additional support from the Director as

    needed.

    3. Workshop Track (see below for details). Throughout the two-year MBA program,

    the Park Leadership Fellows will take part in skill development workshops. These

     9

    workshops are offered by internal and external consultants and trainers. These

    workshops are coordinated with the core curriculum and offered during times when

    there is a minimum of conflict with other scheduled activities. These workshops vary

    from 1/2- to 1-day in length and focus on different leadership themes, personal and

    program reflection, and bringing the 2 classes of Fellows together. The programs are

    offered primarily on weekends and breaks in order to avoid conflicts with other

    activities at the school. The workshops include the following.

    ? Personal Mastery

    ? Personal Mastery II

    ? Conducting Difficult Conversations

    ? Advanced Teams

    ? Managing Change

4. Classroom Track (see below). Starting in the fall semester and continuing through

    the fall semester of the second year, the Park Fellows will meet once or twice a

    month in a classroom setting to support the personal learning plan process

    developed in Foundations in Leadership, discuss leadership theory and cases, and

    participate in experiential activities for internalizing the lessons.

    5. Coaching and Mentoring Teams. First year Fellows are paired with a second year

    mentor, and these mentoring pairs are also grouped into coaching teams of about

    four. These pairs and teams meet periodically to talk about getting the most out of

    experience, follow through on personal learning plans, and to coach one another on

    personal leadership challenges and performance.

    6. Reflection Days. Both classes are brought together for periodic breakfasts and

    social events to network and discuss program activities and direction. At the

    beginning of the spring semester there is a half-day workshop dedicated to learning

    how to make the program stronger.

7. Community Service Days. At the beginning of the fall semester and at the end of

    the spring semester each year, both classes of Fellows will come together to engage

    in a community service activity. The purpose of these days is to increase networking

    and to develop an enduring sense of responsibility to our communities.

8. More Practice in Courses and Extra-curricular Activities. The Fellows have

    many opportunities to practice the skills learned in team-based courses, projects, club

    activities and the organization of various special projects.

    9. Advanced Workshop: The Arizona Experience (optional, 1 credit). For those

    wanting a more in-depth experience in developing interpersonal, team, and

    leadership skills, all Park Fellows have the opportunity to take the Arizona

    Experience, a one-week outdoor team and leadership training program roughly

    modeled after Outward Bound that the school has conducted over spring break. The

    course combines all elements of the learning cycle.

     10

Report this document

For any questions or suggestions please email
cust-service@docsford.com