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Strategic Plan for 2005-2015 - United Nations Environment

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During this experts' meeting, the Business Excellence Model (BEM) and the SWOT Analysis were used as analytical tools, in addition to working groups and

    LUSAKA AGREEMENT TASK FORCE

    DRAFT

    STRATEGIC PLAN

    JULY 2005

    LUSAKA AGREEMENT ON CO-OPERATIVE ENFORCEMENT OPERATIONS DIRECTED

    AT ILLEGAL TRADE IN WILD FAUNA AND FLORA

    “FIGHTING WILDLIFE CRIME IN AFRICA”

    TABLE OF CONTENTS

    LIST OF TABLES ......................................................................................................................2

    ACRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONS ....................................................................................3

    EXECUTIVE SUMMARY .........................................................................................................4

    INTRODUCTION ......................................................................................................................7 (a) Background Information ..............................................................................................7

    (b) Rationale for developing the Strategic Plan ..................................................................9

    (c) Methodology ............................................................................................................. 10

PART I: SITUATION ANALYSIS ........................................................................ 12

    1. The Objective of the Lusaka Agreement ........................................................................ 12

    2. Functions and Responsibilities of the Task Force ........................................................... 12

    3. Achievements and Challenges of the Task Force ........................................................... 13

    3.1 Achievements of the Task Force ....................................................................................... 14

    3.2 Challenges of the Task Force ............................................................................................ 15 4. Stakeholder/Customer Analysis ..................................................................................... 18

    5. Problem Analysis .......................................................................................................... 21 7. Critical Issues ................................................................................................................ 28

PART II: THE PLAN ............................................................................................... 31

    Vision Statement ................................................................................................................... 31 Mission Statement ................................................................................................................. 31 Core Value Statements .......................................................................................................... 31 The Strategic Plan ................................................................................................................. 32 Monitoring and Evaluation of the Plan .................................................................................. 45 APPENDIX I: STRATEGIC PLAN MATRIX .................................................................. 46

     APPENDIX II: OPERATIONAL PLAN-ACTIVITY COSTING TABLE…………………52

     1 LATF DRAFT STRATEGIC PLAN

    LIST OF TABLES

    Table Content Page

    Ref:

    th1.3.1 Summary of Evaluation Report recommendations as adopted by the 7

    Governing Council of the Lusaka Agreement 14

    1.4.1 Stakeholder/Customer Analysis 17

    1.6.1 Strengths and Weaknesses of LATF 22

    1.6.2 Opportunities and Threats/Challenges of LATF 23

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    ACRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONS

    AFLEG: Africa Forest Law Enforcement and Governance (Yaoundé Declaration)

    CBD: Convention on Biological Diversity

    CITES: Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna

    and Flora

    CMS: Convention for Migratory Species

    COMIFAC: Conference of Ministers in charge of Forests of Central Africa

    GC: Governing Council of the Lusaka Agreement

    ICPO-Interpol: International Criminal Police Organization

    I-24/7: Interpol’s Global Communication System

    KWS: Kenya Wildlife Service

    LATF: Lusaka Agreement Task Force/Task Force

    LEAs: Law Enforcement Agencies

    LUSAKA AGREEMENT: Lusaka Agreement on Co-operative Enforcement Operations Directed at

    Illegal Trade in Wild Fauna and Flora MEAs: Multilateral Environmental Agreements

    MEFE: Ministiere de l’Economie Forestiere et de l’Environment (Republique du

    Congo)

    MIS: Management Information System

    MOU: Memorandum of Understanding

    NBs: National Bureaus of the Lusaka Agreement

    NGOs: Non-Governmental Organizations

    OCFSA: Organisation pour la Conservation de la Faune Sauvage D’Afrique

    (Organization for Conservation of African Wildlife) RILO: Regional Intelligence Liaison Office (of the World Customs

    Organization)

    ROCCISS: Regional Organized Counter Crime Intelligence Sharing System (of

    Interpol)

    SADC: Southern Africa Development Community

    TANAPA: Tanzania National Parks

    TZWD: Tanzania Wildlife Division

    UNEP: United Nations Environment Programme

    UWA: Uganda Wildlife Authority

    WCO: World Customs Organization

    ZAWA: Zambia Wildlife Authority

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    LATF DRAFT STRATEGIC PLAN

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

    1. The Lusaka Agreement on Co-operative Enforcement Operations Directed at Illegal Trade in Wild Fauna and Flora (hereinafter referred to as the Lusaka Agreement or the Agreement) is the only existing practically oriented co-operative enforcement instrument assisting the implementation of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) and other biodiversity related agreements at regional level. The scope of application of the Agreement is the African region. The main objective of the Agreement is for the parties to undertake activities intended to reduce and ultimately eliminate illegal trade in wild fauna and flora. In this regard, the Agreement establishes a three-tier institutional mechanism comprising of the Lusaka Agreement Task Force (a regional permanent enforcement body herein referred to as the Task Force or LATF); National Bureaus (the relevant implementing and enforcement body within each party state); and the Governing Council (a ministerial policy and decision-making body).

    2. The Agreement was adopted in Lusaka, Zambia on 8 September 1994 and is open to ratification and accession by all African states. Presently, parties to the Agreement consist of the following states: Republic of Congo (Brazzaville), Kenya, Lesotho, Tanzania, Uganda and Zambia (Party States or Parties). Ethiopia, South Africa and Swaziland are signatories, and a number of other African states, which include Cameroon, D.R. Congo, Mozambique, Rwanda, Senegal, Somalia and Sudan, have expressed interest in the Agreement.

    3. To ensure that it effectively conducts its activities with the support of the National Bureaus and the Party States, the Governing Council of the Agreement requested the Executive Director of UNEP, in collaboration with the Director of the Task Force, to initiate and assist the Parties to carry out a review and evaluation of the work of the Task Force since its adoption in 1994. A subsequent report prepared by UNEP in March 2005 (Evaluation Report) outlined the efficiency and effectiveness of the bodies established under the Agreement and made recommendations intended to further strengthen and enhance the implementation of the Agreement.

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    LATF DRAFT STRATEGIC PLAN

3. Recommendations in the Evaluation Report for the enhancement of the Governing

    Council include using a participatory process in the development of the Task Force Strategic

    Plan out of which strategies for its financial sustainability and of payment of arrears by some

    Party States would be key outputs. Other recommendations include increased cooperation with

    other regional and international bodies, developing a strategy to attract new Parties, and

    enhancement of the political profile of the Lusaka Agreement.

4. Decision VII/1B of the 7th Governing Council meeting that called upon the Task Force to

    urgently develop its Strategic Plan triggered it to initiate the planning process. Consequently a

    consultative meeting of experts from Party States was convened in April 2005 marking the

    commencement of the process. A second workshop that was attended by representatives from all

    st May 2005 in Nairobi Kenya. The draft Parties, UNEP and other partners was held from 18 to 21

    from the first meeting was presented and intensively discussed at this workshop whose

    contributions have been incorporated in this draft strategic plan.

5. This strategic plan covers two Parts: I and II.

    Part I entails the situation analysis of the Task Force which specifically outlines:

    ? The objective of the Lusaka Agreement,

    ? Functions and responsibilities of the Task Force,

    ? Achievements and challenges of the Task Force,

    ? Stakeholder Analysis,

    ? Problem Analysis,

    ? Organizational Scan, and

    ? Critical Issues. Part II is the actual plan, which contains:

    ? The Vision,

    ? Mission,

    ? Core value statements,

    ? Key Results Areas,

    ? Goals and their respective key performance indicators,

    ? Objectives,

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    LATF DRAFT STRATEGIC PLAN

    ? Strategies,

    ? Targets,

    ? Activities, and

    ? Monitoring and Evaluation.

     The plan details the identified strategies in narrative prose as well as a matrix (Appendix I) that enumerates five goals and their Key Performance Indicators, thirteen Strategic Objectives,

    twenty seven Targets and sixty two Activities to be implemented over the ten-year period. The

    matrix is a logical frame that shows the inter-relationship between strategic objectives and

    activities outlined. The plan also details the Operational Plan-Activity Costing (Appendix II).

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INTRODUCTION

    (a) Background Information

    Illegal trade in wild fauna and flora in many parts of Africa has been going on unabated notwithstanding the existence of international instruments such as the Convention of Nature and Natural resources (Algiers, 1968 and as revised and adopted at Maputo, 2003), the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (Washington D.C, 1973) and the Convention on Biological Diversity (Rio de Janeiro, 1992). Intense poaching prompted by illegal markets has resulted in severe decimation of certain wildlife populations in African States.

    The trans-boundary character and the threat created by illegal cross-border wildlife trade made several African Governments realize that their individual efforts and traditional enforcement methods were no longer capable of providing effective protection to the African wildlife from illegal trade. Consequently, this realization led to the adoption of the Lusaka Agreement on Co-operative Enforcement Operations Directed at Illegal Trade in Wild Fauna and Flora (herein referred to as the Lusaka Agreement or Agreement) in Lusaka on 8 September 1994. The Lusaka Agreement is open for ratification and accession by all African states. Presently members consist of the following States: - Congo (Brazzaville), Kenya, Lesotho, Tanzania, Uganda and Zambia. Three countries, namely Ethiopia, South Africa and Swaziland are signatories. A number of other African states have expressed interest in the Agreement.

    The implementation of the Lusaka Agreement is mainly guided by the text of its Final Act that

    thwas adopted on 8 September 1994 in Lusaka, Zambia under the auspices of UNEP and

    subsequently deposited with the Secretary General of the United Nations. To effectively implement the Agreement, a three-tier institutional mechanism was established comprising a regional permanent enforcement body known as the Lusaka Agreement Task Force; the implementing and enforcement body established or designated by each Party State called a National Bureau, and the Governing Council, which is a ministerial policy and decision-making body. The Governing Council elects its officers composed of the President, Vice-President and a

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    LATF DRAFT STRATEGIC PLAN

Rapporteur, known as the Bureau of the Governing Council. This Bureau serves as an oversight

    committee of the Governing Council decisions and monitors the performance of the Task Force.

    st June 1999. It is composed The Task Force was established and commenced its operations on 1

    of national law enforcement officers seconded from member states. These officers serve the Task

    Force and at the same time retain their enforcement powers at national level. Invariably the Task

    Force, in implementing the Agreement has and continues to cooperate with the National Bureaus

    of the Party States.

Since inception, the Task Force has played a key role on co-operative enforcement operations aimed at

    minimizing illegal trade in wild fauna and flora. To fulfil this mandate, the Task Force continues to

    gather intelligence information and conduct investigations through undertaking field operations in Party

    States. It also shares such information with the Parties and other relevant bodies.

In addition to its enforcement mandate, the Task Force, which also serves as the Secretariat of

    the Agreement, organises Governing Council meetings attended by representatives from the

    Party States to discuss and review the implementation of the Agreement. The most recent was

    ththstthe 7 Governing Council meeting which was held from 19 to 21 January 2005 in Nairobi.

    The meeting had as one of its key agenda items, discussion of the Evaluation Report it had

    threquested to be prepared at its 6 Governing Council.

The purpose of the review was to assess the status and effectiveness of the implementation,

    compliance and enforcement of the Agreement as well as measure the impact of its

    implementation since its adoption in 1994, and to make recommendations for the enhancement

    of the Task Force and the Agreement. The Evaluation Report prepared by UNEP assessed and

    determined the extent to which: -

    (i) The Agreement has or has not succeeded to fulfil its objective;

    (ii) The Parties to the Agreement have or have not been able to fulfil their obligations

    called for under the Agreement and if not reasons for the failure or delays;

    (iii) Whether the institutional structures established under the Agreement are effective

    and functioning efficiently;

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    LATF DRAFT STRATEGIC PLAN

    (iv) Financial situation and management of funds for the work of LATF and the

    implementation of the Agreement by the Parties; and

    (v) Whether the Agreement has succeeded or not to attract new Parties as it is open

    for accession to any African state (Article 12(3)).

A summary of the recommendations set out in the UNEP Evaluation Report, and those adopted

    th Governing Council are outlined under section 3.2 of this document. by the 7

(b) Rationale for developing the Strategic Plan

    Since the Task Force was officially launched in 1999, it has had no Strategic Plan. Its operations

    have this far been guided by the overall objective of the Agreement, decisions of the Governing

    Council as well as the functions of the Task Force. However to provide a clear road map for the

    Task Force, it was considered imperative both by the Evaluation Report and the Governing

    Council to develop a Strategic Plan that would outline fundamental strategies in ensuring that

    operations and functions are sustained and more focused over a defined period of time.

The comprehensive Evaluation Report assessed the efficiency and effectiveness of the bodies

    established under the Agreement so as to effectively facilitate the implementation and

    enforcement of the Agreement. The report made a myriad of specific recommendations to be

    implemented by the Governing Council, Task Force and the National Bureaus. It noted that one

    of the major challenges facing the Task Force is inadequate financing of its programmes by Party

    States, which has adversely affected its ability to perform effectively and efficiently. It further

    noted that the Task Force has been operating without clear strategies and prioritised activities in

    order to function more effectively, hence the need to develop a Strategic Plan in the short,

    medium and long term. This Strategic Plan takes into account these recommendations.

    thIn this regard, the 7 Governing Council in its Decision VII/1(B) resolved that the

    recommendation to urgently develop a Strategic Plan be implemented forthwith. This exercise

    would also fulfill Decision VI/6(1), which called upon the Task Force to develop, on a priority

    basis, its strategic plan of action.

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    LATF DRAFT STRATEGIC PLAN

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