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ELE 364-Mathematics Methods

By Florence Ray,2014-03-26 14:30
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Presents the pedagogical framework for teaching various mathematical topics by involving EMC 1: recognizes the individuality and worth of each student,

    Syllabus for

    ELE 364Mathematics Methods

    3 Credit hours

    Fall 2001

    The Mission of the School of Education is to provide the opportunity for individuals who hold Christian

    principles to participate in advanced study in preparation for the professional public and private

    responsibilities in the field of education throughout the world.

    I. COURSE DESCRIPTION

    Focuses on the methods and materials used in teaching mathematics to students in kindergarten through eighth grade. Presents the pedagogical framework for teaching various mathematical topics by involving the adult learner in activities that have implications for teaching children. Issues studied include the history of mathematics, cultural issues, and assessment, as well as methods and material relevant to specific topics such as number readiness, operations with various number sets, problem solving, geometry, and measurement.

    Prerequisites: MAT 151, MAT 221, MAT 222, and MAT 232.

    II. COURSE GOALS

    The purpose of this course is to provide the student with basic learning theories and teaching strategies for the classroom. The student will learn techniques, approaches, and methodologies st century. for teaching mathematics in the 21

    III. COURSE OBJECTIVES

A. Objectives

    As a result of successfully completing this course, the teacher candidate will be able to

    do the following:

    1. demonstrate the use of the following concrete materials to develop and reinforce

    mathematical concepts:

    abacus hundreds chart

    addition facts chart maps of the solids

    algebra pieces money

    base-n blocks multiplication facts chart

    clocks pattern blocks

    compass protractor

    counters rulers

    Cuisenaire rods scales

    fraction circles snap cubes

    fraction strips tangrams

    geoboards yard/meter sticks

    graph paper

    2. prepare lesson plans in mathematics for elementary school students.

    3. alter lessons to fit the needs of field dependent and field independent learners.

    4. develop a plan to promote equity and cultural awareness in the mathematics

    classroom.

    5. develop a plan to address the needs of the exceptional individual in the

    mathematics classroom.

    6. develop a plan for calculator use in the mathematics classroom.

    7. develop formal and informal assessment strategies.

    8. diagnose error patterns and develop intervention plans.

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    9. demonstrate knowledge of the past and present trends in mathematics education

    as well as discuss possible changes and challenges in the future of mathematics

    education.

    10. explain how various theories on child development apply to how children learn

    mathematics and incorporate this knowledge into curriculum planning and

    teaching strategies.

    11. explain the complexities involved in learning to become a problem solver and

    develop strategies to help children become problem solvers.

    12. describe the contributions of different cultures to the field of mathematics, the

    challenges historically faced by students in learning mathematics due to cultural

    or gender issues, and how to alter mathematics curriculum to incorporate cultural

    diversity while encouraging every student to achieve his/her maximum potential. 13. describe the past and present methods of assessing students’ progress in learning

    mathematics and develop a variety of assessment techniques.

    14. explain how to determine a child’s level on number readiness.

    15. develop curriculum, teaching strategies, and assessment techniques for the major

    areas of mathematics: pattern recognition and extension, problem solving, the

    concept of a number, geometry, measurement, numeration, number sense,

    operation sense, algorithm applications, fraction concepts, decimal concepts,

    percents, ratio, proportion, rate, number theory, beginning algebra, graphing,

    statistics, and probability.

    16. develop strategies to utilize technology for teaching mathematics. 17. describe the various organizations that support the teaching of mathematics and

    how to locate resources to supplement materials provided by the local school.

    B. Objectives for Students in Teacher Preparation Programs

    The Teacher Preparation Program meets the competency-based requirements established by the Oklahoma Commission on Teacher Preparation. This course meets the following competencies: Elementary Mathematics Competencies (EMC) 1-3, 6, 8-15, 17. EMC 1: recognizes the individuality and worth of each student, believes that all

    students can learn and apply mathematics, and demonstrates these beliefs in

    practice.

    EMC 2: uses knowledge of child development and knowledge about the effects of this

    development on the learning of mathematics to guide curricular and

    instructional decisions. This will include primary, intermediate, and middle

    level philosophy, structure, organization, and child development. EMC 3: understands students’ environment and cultural background, individual

    learning differences, student attitudes and aspirations, and community

    expectations and values on the learning of their students.

    EMC 6: has experiences with practical applications of mathematical ideas and the

    applications of these ideas to problem-solving in mathematics, in other

    disciplines, and in the world outside of school.

    EMC 8: is proficient in the use of a variety of instructional strategies to include, but not

    limited to, cooperative learning, use of concrete materials, use of technology

    (i.e. calculators and computers), and writing strategies to stimulate and

    facilitate student learning.

    EMC 9: is proficient in the design of instructional units which incorporate the

    mathematical processes of problem-solving, reasoning, communication, and

    connections into the instruction of content skills.

    EMC 10: has knowledge of how to teach and use this knowledge to make curriculum

    decisions, design instructional strategies and assessment plans, and choose

    materials and resources for mathematics instruction.

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    EMC 11: stimulates and facilitates student learning by using a wide range of formats,

    strategies, technologies, and procedures, and assuming a variety of roles to

    guide student’s learning of mathematics.

    EMC 12: helps students learn mathematics by creating a safe and positive environment

    in which they take responsibility for learning.

    EMC 13: develops students’ abilities to reason and think mathematically, to investigate

    and explore patterns, to discover structures and relationships, to formulate and

    solve problems, and to justify and communicate conclusions.

    EMC 14: employs a range of formal and informal assessment methods to evaluate

    student learning in light of well-defined goals. Results should be used to guide

    the teaching process and provide opportunities of students to reflect on the

    strengths and weaknesses of individual performance.

    EMC 15: regularly reflects on what one teaches and how one teaches. Keeps informed

    of changes in mathematics and in the teaching of mathematics, continually

    seeking to improve his/her knowledge and practice.

    EMC 17: collaborates with peers and other education professionals to strengthen their

    school’s programs, advance knowledge, and contribute to improving practice

    within the field.

    IV. TEXTBOOK

    Cathcart, W. G., Pothier, Y. M., Vance, J. H., & Bezuk, N. S. (2000). Learning mathematics in

     elementary and middle schools. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Merrill.

    V. POLICIES AND PROCEDURES

    A. University Policies and Procedures

    1. Attendance at each class or laboratory is mandatory at Oral Roberts University.

    2. Double cuts will be assessed for absences immediately preceding or following

    holidays.

    3. Excessive absences can reduce a student's grade or deny credit for the course.

    4. Students taking a late exam because of an unauthorized absence will be charged

    a late exam fee.

    5. Students and faculty at Oral Roberts University adhere to all laws addressing the

    ethical use of others’ materials, whether it is in the form of print, video,

    multimedia, or computer software.

    6. Final exams cannot be given before their scheduled times. Students need to

    check the final exam schedule before planning return flights or other events at

    the end of the semester.

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    B. Course Policies and Procedures

    1. Evaluation Procedures

    Grading Scale:

    Class Assignments = 30%

    Group Project and Presentation = 10%

    Tests = 40%

    Final Examination = 20%

    Total = 100%

    Point Distribution:

    90% - 100% A

    80% - 89% B

    70% - 79% C

    60% - 69% D

    Below 60% F

    2. Portfolio Requirements

    a. Philosophy of mathematics education

    b. Written lesson plans (instructional strategies) developed by the student

    including the correlating assessment techniques and all necessary

    materials

    c. Evidence of membership in an organization that supports the teaching of

    and research in mathematics

    d. Instructional manipulatives created or located by the student and

    instructions for their use in developing a mathematical concept or skill

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VI. COURSE CALENDAR

    Week Topic Text Assignment 1 Teaching Mathematics: Influences and Directions Chapter 1 Mathematics

    Learning and Teaching Mathematics Chapter 2 Autobiography 2 Developing Mathematical Thinking and Problem-Chapter 3 Lesson Plan

    Solving Ability

    3 Assessing Mathematics Understanding Chapter 4 Assessment Article

    TEST 1 Chapters 1-4

    4 Developing Number Concepts Chapter 5 Base 10 Blocks

    Developing Understanding of Numeration Chapter 6 Counters

    Manipulatives 5 Developing Whole Number Chapter 6 Literature

    Operations: Meaning of Operations Chapter 7 Connection 6 Developing Whole Number Chapter 7 Cuisenaire Rods

    Operations: Mastering the Basic Facts Chapter 8

    7 Estimation and Computational Procedures Chapter 8 Hundred Chart

    for Whole Numbers Chapter 9 Lesson Plan

    TEST 2 Chapters 5-9

    8 Developing Fraction Concepts Chapter 10 Fraction Circles 9 Developing Fraction Computation Chapter 11 Fraction Bars 10 Developing Decimal Concepts and Computation Chapter 12 Graph Squares

    Number Line 11 Understanding Ratio, Proportion, and Percent Chapter 13 Journal Article

    Test 3 Chapters 10-13

    12 Developing Geometry Thinking and Spatial Sense Chapter 14 Nets, Solids

    13 Developing Measurement Concepts and Skills Chapter 15 Geoboards

    Cm. Paper 14 Collecting, Organizing, and Interpreting Data Chapter 16 Probability Activities

    15 Developing Integers and Algebraic Thinking Chapter 17 Graphing

    Test 4 Chapters 14-17

     Review Philosophy of

    Mathematics Education FINAL EXAMINATION Cumulative

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VII. ASSESSMENT SUMMARY

    Dorothy J. Radin ELE 364 Mathematics Methods Education Name of Instructor Course # Title of Course Name of Department

    MISSION MAJOR OUTCOMES COURSE GOALS ASSESSMENT OF

     COURSE GOALS The lifestyle at ORU is rooted This course is designed to help the student To explain how various theories on child in the word "Wholeness." meet Elementary Mathematics Subject development apply to how children learn STIMULI: ORU seeks to educate the Competencies 1-3, 6, 8-15, 17. mathematics and incorporate this knowledge whole person, with balanced into curriculum planning and teaching Midterm Exam.

     emphasis placed on the 1. believes and demonstrates that all strategies. development of mind, spirit, students can learn and apply mathematics. Final Exam. To explain the complexities involved in and body. 2. uses knowledge of child development to learning to become a problem solver and guide curricular and instructional Group projects to develop strategies to help children become GENERAL OUTCOMES decisions. demonstrate and explain the problem solvers. 3. understands students’ environment and use of concrete materials.

    To describe the contributions of different 1. Spiritual Development cultural background, individual learning

    cultures to the field of mathematics, the differences, and community expectations. Individual lesson plans and

    challenges historically faced by students in 2. Physical Development 6. has experiences with practical textbook assignments.

    learning mathematics due to cultural or applications of mathematical ideas.

    gender issues, and how to alter mathematics 3. Communication 8. is proficient in the use of a variety of

    curriculum to incorporate cultural diversity instructional strategies. CRITERIA:

    while encouraging every student to achieve 4. Analysis 9. is proficient in the design of instructional

    his/her maximum potential. units. Group Project 10% 5. Problem Solving 10. has knowledge of how to teach. Tests 40% To develop a variety of assessment 11. stimulates and facilitates student learning Class Assignments 30% techniques. 6. Valuing in Decision by using a wide range of strategies and Final Exam 20%

    Making procedures. Total 100% To explain how to determine a child’s level

     12. helps students learn mathematics by on number readiness. 7. Social Interaction creating a safe and positive. To develop curriculum, teaching strategies, 13. develops students’ abilities. and assessment techniques for the major 8. Global Perspectives 14. employs a range of formal and informal areas of mathematics. assessment methods.

    9. Effective Citizenship 15. keeps informed of changes in To develop strategies to utilize technology

     mathematics and in the teaching of for teaching mathematics. 10. Aesthetic Responsiveness mathematics. To describe the various organizations that 17 collaborates with peers and other support the teaching of mathematics. education professionals.

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