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kane

By Ramon Clark,2014-04-15 04:08
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kane

CITIZEN KANE

Screenplay by Herman J. Mankiewicz

     Orson Welles

Produced by Orson Welles

Directed by Orson Welles

Cast List:

    Orson Welles Charles Foster Kane Joseph Cotton Jedediah Leland Dorothy Comingore Susan Alexander Everett Sloane Mr. Bernstein Ray Collins Boss J.W. "Big Jim" Gettys George Coulouris Walter Parks Thatcher Agnes Moorehead Mary Kane Paul Stewart Raymond Ruth Warrick Emily Norton Kane

PROLOGUE

    FADE IN:

EXT. XANADU FAINT DAWN 1940 (MINIATURE)

Window, very small in the distance, illuminated.

All around this is an almost totally black screen. Now, as the camera moves slowly towards the

    window which is almost a postage stamp in the frame, other forms appear; barbed wire, cyclone

    fencing, and now, looming up against an early morning sky, enormous iron grille work. Camera

    travels up what is now shown to be a gateway of gigantic proportions and holds on the top of it a

    huge initial "K" showing darker and darker against the dawn sky. Through this and beyond we see

    the fairy-tale mountaintop of Xanadu, the great castle a sillhouette as its summit, the little window

    a distant accent in the darkness.

    DISSOLVE:

A SERIES OF SET-UPS, EACH CLOSER TO THE GREAT WINDOW, ALL TELLING

    SOMETHING OF:

    The literally incredible domain of CHARLES FOSTER KANE.

Its right flank resting for nearly forty miles on the Gulf Coast, it truly extends in all directions

    farther than the eye can see. Designed by nature to be almost completely bare and flat it was, as will develop, practically all marshland when Kane acquired and changed its face it is now pleasantly uneven, with its fair share of rolling hills and one very good-sized mountain, all man-

    made. Almost all the land is improved, either through cultivation for farming purposes of through

    careful landscaping, in the shape of parks and lakes. The castle dominates itself, an enormous pile,

    compounded of several genuine castles, of European origin, of varying architecture dominates the scene, from the very peak of the mountain.

    DISSOLVE:

GOLF LINKS (MINIATURE)

Past which we move. The greens are straggly and overgrown, the fairways wild with tropical

    weeds, the links unused and not seriously tended for a long time.

    DISSOLVE OUT:

    DISSOLVE IN:

WHAT WAS ONCE A GOOD-SIZED ZOO (MINIATURE)

Of the Hagenbeck type. All that now remains, with one exception, are the individual plots,

    surrounded by moats, on which the animals are kept, free and yet safe from each other and the

    landscape at large. (Signs on several of the plots indicate that here there were once tigers, lions,

    girrafes.)

    DISSOLVE:

THE MONKEY TERRACE (MINIATURE)

In the foreground, a great obscene ape is outlined against the dawn murk. He is scratching himself

    slowly, thoughtfully, looking out across the estates of Charles Foster Kane, to the distant light

    glowing in the castle on the hill.

    DISSOLVE:

THE ALLIGATOR PIT (MINIATURE)

    The idiot pile of sleepy dragons. Reflected in the muddy water the lighted window.

THE LAGOON (MINIATURE)

    The boat landing sags. An old newspaper floats on the surface of the water a copy of the New York Enquirer." As it moves across the frame, it discloses again the reflection of the window in the

    castle, closer than before.

THE GREAT SWIMMING POOL (MINIATURE)

It is empty. A newspaper blows across the cracked floor of the tank.

    DISSOLVE:

THE COTTAGES (MINIATURE)

In the shadows, literally the shadows, of the castle. As we move by, we see that their doors and

    windows are boarded up and locked, with heavy bars as further protection and sealing.

    DISSOLVE OUT:

    DISSOLVE IN:

A DRAWBRIDGE (MINIATURE)

Over a wide moat, now stagnant and choked with weeds. We move across it and through a huge

    solid gateway into a formal garden, perhaps thirty yards wide and one hundred yards deep, which

    extends right up to the very wall of the castle. The landscaping surrounding it has been sloppy and

    causal for a long time, but this particular garden has been kept up in perfect shape. As the camera

    makes its way through it, towards the lighted window of the castle, there are revealed rare and

    exotic blooms of all kinds. The dominating note is one of almost exaggerated tropical lushness,

    hanging limp and despairing. Moss, moss, moss. Ankor Wat, the night the last King died.

    DISSOLVE:

THE WINDOW (MINIATURE)

Camera moves in until the frame of the window fills the frame of the screen. Suddenly, the light

    within goes out. This stops the action of the camera and cuts the music which has been

    accompanying the sequence. In the glass panes of the window, we see reflected the ripe, dreary

    landscape of Mr. Kane's estate behind and the dawn sky.

    DISSOLVE:

INT. KANE'S BEDROOM FAINT DAWN 1940

A very long shot of Kane's enormous bed, silhouetted against the enormous window.

    DISSOLVE:

INT. KANE'S BEDROOM FAINT DAWN 1940

A snow scene. An incredible one. Big, impossible flakes of snow, a too picturesque farmhouse and

    a snow man. The jingling of sleigh bells in the musical score now makes an ironic reference to

    Indian Temple bells the music freezes

    KANE'S OLD OLD VOICE

    Rosebud...

The camera pulls back, showing the whole scene to be contained in one of those glass balls which

    are sold in novelty stores all over the world. A hand Kane's hand, which has been holding the

    ball, relaxes. The ball falls out of his hand and bounds down two carpeted steps leading to the bed,

    the camera following. The ball falls off the last step onto the marble floor where it breaks, the

    fragments glittering in the first rays of the morning sun. This ray cuts an angular pattern across

    the floor, suddenly crossed with a thousand bars of light as the blinds are pulled across the

    window.

The foot of Kane's bed. The camera very close. Outlined against the shuttered window, we can see

    a form the form of a nurse, as she pulls the sheet up over his head. The camera follows this

    action up the length of the bed and arrives at the face after the sheet has covered it.

    FADE OUT:

    FADE IN:

INT. OF A MOTION PICTURE PROJECTION ROOM

On the screen as the camera moves in are the words:

MAIN TITLE

Stirring, brassy music is heard on the soundtrack (which, of course, sounds more like a soundtrack

    than ours.)

The screen in the projection room fills our screen as the second title appears:

CREDITS

NOTE: Here follows a typical news digest short, one of the regular monthly or bi-monthly

    features, based on public events or personalities. These are distinguished from ordinary newsreels

    and short subjects in that they have a fully developed editorial or storyline. Some of the more

    obvious characteristics of the "March of Time," for example, as well as other documentary shorts,

    will be combined to give an authentic impression of this now familiar type of short subject. As is

    the accepted procedure in these short subjects, a narrator is used as well as explanatory titles.

    FADE OUT:

NEWS DIGEST

    NARRATOR

    Legendary was the Xanadu where Kubla Kahn decreed his

    stately pleasure dome

    (with quotes in his voice)

    "Where twice five miles of fertile ground, with walls and

    towers were girdled 'round."

    (dropping the quotes)

    Today, almost as legendary is Florida's XANADU world's

    largest private pleasure ground. Here, on the deserts of the

    Gulf Coast, a private mountain was commissioned,

    successfully built for its landlord. Here in a private valley,

    as in the Coleridge poem, "blossoms many an incense-

    bearing tree." Verily, "a miracle of rare device."

U.S.A.

CHARLES FOSTER KANE

Opening shot of great desolate expanse of Florida coastline (1940 DAY)

    DISSOLVE:

SERIES OF SHOTS

Showing various aspects of Xanadu, all as they might be photographed by an ordinary newsreel

    cameraman nicely photographed, but not atmospheric to the extreme extent of the Prologue

    (1940).

    NARRATOR

    (dropping the quotes)

    Here, for Xanadu's landlord, will be held 1940's biggest,

    strangest funeral; here this week is laid to rest a potent

    figure of our Century America's Kubla Kahn Charles

    Foster Kane. In journalism's history, other names are

    honored more than Charles Foster Kane's, more justly

    revered. Among publishers, second only to James Gordon

    Bennet the First: his dashing, expatriate son; England's

    Northcliffe and Beaverbrook; Chicago's Patterson and

    McCormick;

TITLE:

"TO FORTY-FOUR MILLION U.S. NEWS BUYERS, MORE NEWSWORTHY THAN

    THE NAMES IN HIS OWN HEADLINES, WAS KANE HIMSELF, GREATEST

    NEWSPAPER TYCOON OF THIS OR ANY OTHER GENERATION."

Shot of a huge, screen-filling picture of Kane. Pull back to show that it is a picture on the front

    page of the "Enquirer," surrounded by the reversed rules of mourning, with masthead and

    headlines. (1940)

    DISSOLVE:

A GREAT NUMBER OF HEADLINES

Set in different types and different styles, obviously from different papers, all announcing Kane's

    death, all appearing over photographs of Kane himself (perhaps a fifth of the headlines are in

    foreign languages). An important item in connection with the headlines is that many of them

    positively not all reveal passionately conflicting opinions about Kane. Thus, they contain variously the words "patriot," "democrat," "pacifist," "war-monger," "traitor," "idealist,"

    "American," etc.

TITLE:

"1895 TO 1940 ALL OF THESE YEARS HE COVERED, MANY OF THESE YEARS HE

    WAS."

Newsreel shots of San Francisco during and after the fire, followed by shots of special trains with

    large streamers: "Kane Relief Organization." Over these shots superimpose the date 1906.

Artist's painting of Foch's railroad car and peace negotiators, if actual newsreel shot unavailable.

    Over this shot sumperimpose the date 1918.

    NARRATOR

    Denver's Bonfils and Sommes; New York's late, great

    Joseph Pulitzer; America's emperor of the news syndicate,

    another editorialist and landlord, the still mighty and once

    mightier Hearst. Great names all of them but none of

    them so loved, hated, feared, so often spoken as Charles

    Foster Kane. The San Francisco earthquake. First with the

    news were the Kane papers. First with Relief of the

    Sufferers, First with the news of their Relief of the

    Sufferers. Kane papers scoop the world on the Armistice

    publish, eight hours before competitors, complete details of

    the Armistice teams granted the Germans by Marshall

    Foch from his railroad car in the Forest of Compeigne. For

    forty years appeared in Kane newsprint no public issue on

    which Kane papers took no stand. No public man whom

    Kane himself did not support or denounce often support,

    then denounce. Its humble beginnings, a dying dailey

Shots with the date 1898 (to be supplied)

Shots with the date 1910 (to be supplied)

Shots with the date 1922 (to be supplied)

Headlines, cartoons, contemporary newreels or stills of the following:

1. WOMAN SUFFRAGE

The celebrated newsreel shot of about 1914.

2. PROHIBITION

Breaking up of a speakeasy and such.

3. T.V.A.

4. LABOR RIOTS

Brief clips of old newreel shots of William Jennings Bryan, Theodore Roosevelt, Stalin, Walter P.

    Thatcher, Al Smith, McKinley, Landon, Franklin D. Roosevelt and such. Also, recent newsreels of

    the elderly Kane with such Nazis as Hitler and Goering; and England's Chamberlain and

    Churchill.

Shot of a ramshackle building with old-fashioned presses showing through plate glass windows

    and the name "Enquirer" in old-fashioned gold letters. (1892)

    DISSOLVE:

    NARRATOR

    Kane's empire, in its glory, held dominion over thirty-seven

    newpapers, thirteen magazines, a radio network. An

    empire upon an empire. The first of grocery stores, paper

    mills, apartment buildings, factories, forests, ocean-liners

    An empire through which for fifty years flowed, in an

    unending stream, the wealth of the earth's third richest

    gold mine... Famed in American legend is the origin of the

    Kane fortune... How, to boarding housekeeper Mary Kane,

    by a defaulting boarder, in 1868 was left the supposedly

    worthless deed to an abandoned mine shaft: The Colorado

    Lode.

The magnificent Enquirer Building of today.

1891-1911 a map of the USA, covering the entire screen, which in animated diagram shows the

    Kane publications spreading from city to city. Starting from New York, minature newboys speed

    madly to Chicago, Detroit, St. Louis, Los Angeles, San Francisco, Washington, Atlanta, El Paso,

    etc., screaming "Wuxtry, Kane Papers, Wuxtry."

Shot of a large mine going full blast, chimneys belching smoke, trains moving in and out, etc. A

    large sign reads "Colorado Lode Mining Co." (1940) Sign reading; "Little Salem, CO 25

    MILES."

    DISSOLVE:

AN OLD STILL SHOT

Of Little Salem as it was 70 years ago (identified by copper-plate caption beneath the still). (1870)

Shot of early tintype stills of Thomas Foster Kane and his wife, Mary, on their wedding day. A

    similar picture of Mary Kane some four or five years later with her little boy, Charles Foster Kane.

    NARRATOR

    Fifty-seven years later, before a Congressional

    Investigation, Walter P. Thatcher, grand old man of Wall

    Street, for years chief target of Kane papers' attack on

    "trusts," recalls a journey he made as a youth...

Shot of Capitol, in Washington D.C.

Shot of Congressional Investigating Committee (reproduction of existing J.P. Morgan newsreel).

    This runs silent under narration. Walter P. Thatcher is on the stand. He is flanked by his son,

    Walter P. Thatcher Jr., and other partners. He is being questioned by some Merry Andrew

    congressmen. At this moment, a baby alligator has just been placed in his lap, causing

    considerable confusion and embarrassment.

Newsreel close-up of Thatcher, the soundtrack of which now fades in.

    THATCHER

... because of that trivial incident...

    INVESTIGATOR It is a fact, however, is it not, that in 1870, you did go to

    Colorado?

    THATCHER I did.

    INVESTIGATOR In connection with the Kane affairs?

    THATCHER Yes. My firm had been appointed trustees by Mrs. Kane for

    the fortune, which she had recently acquired. It was her

    wish that I should take charge of this boy, Charles Foster

    Kane.

    NARRATOR That same month in Union Square

    INVESTIGATOR Is it not a fact that on that occasion, the boy personally

    attacked you after striking you in the stomach with a sled?

    Loud laughter and confusion.

    THATCHER Mr. Chairman, I will read to this committee a prepared

    statement I have brought with me and I will then refuse

    to answer any further questions. Mr. Johnson, please!

    A young assistant hands him a sheet of paper from a briefcase.

    THATCHER

    (reading it)

    "With full awareness of the meaning of my words and the

    responsibility of what I am about to say, it is my considered

    belief that Mr. Charles Foster Kane, in every essence of his

    social beliefs and by the dangerous manner in which he has

    persistently attacked the American traditions of private

    property, initiative and opportunity for advancement, is

    in fact nothing more or less than a Communist."

    Newsreel of Union Square meeting, section of crowd carrying banners urging the boycott of Kane

    papers. A speaker is on the platform above the crowd.

    SPEAKER

    (fading in on soundtrack)

     till the words "Charles Foster Kane" are a menace to

    every working man in this land. He is today what he has

    always been and always will be A FASCIST!

    NARRATOR And yet another opinion Kane's own.

Silent newsreel on a windy platform, flag-draped, in front of the magnificent Enquirer building.

    On platform, in full ceremonial dress, is Charles Foster Kane. He orates silently.

TITLE:

"I AM, HAVE BEEN, AND WILL BE ONLY ONE THING AN AMERICAN."

    CHARLES FOSTER KANE.

Same locale, Kane shaking hands out of frame.

Another newsreel shot, much later, very brief, showing Kane, older and much fatter, very tired-

    looking, seated with his second wife in a nightclub. He looks lonely and unhappy in the midst of

    the gaiety.

    NARRATOR

    Twice married, twice divorced first to a president's niece,

    Emily Norton today, by her second marriage, chatelaine

    of the oldest of England's stately homes. Sixteen years after

    that two weeks after his divorce from Emily Norton

    Kane married Susan Alexander, singer, at the Town Hall in

    Trenton, New Jersey.

TITLE:

"FEW PRIVATE LIVES WERE MORE PUBLIC"

Period still of Emily Norton (1900).

    DISSOLVE:

RECONSTRUCTED SILENT NEWSREEL

Kane, Susan, and Bernstein emerging from side doorway of City Hall into a ring of press

    photographers, reporters, etc. Kane looks startled, recoils for an instance, then charges down

    upon the photographers, laying about him with his stick, smashing whatever he can hit.

    NARRATOR

    For wife two, one-time opera singing Susan Alexander,

    Kane built Chicago's Municipal Opera House. Cost: three

    million dollars. Conceived for Susan Alexander Kane, half-

    finished before she divorced him, the still unfinished

    Xanadu. Cost: no man can say.

Still of architect's sketch with typically glorified "rendering" of the Chicago Municipal Opera

    House.

    DISSOLVE:

A GLAMOROUS SHOT

Of the almost-finished Xanadu, a magnificent fairy-tale estate built on a mountain. (1920)

Then shots of its preparation. (1917)

Shots of truck after truck, train after train, flashing by with tremendous noise.

Shots of vast dredges, steamshovels.

Shot of ship standing offshore unloading its lighters.

In quick succession, shots follow each other, some reconstructed, some in miniature, some real

    shots (maybe from the dam projects) of building, digging, pouring concrete, etc.

    NARRATOR

    One hundred thousand trees, twenty thousand tons of

    marble, are the ingredients of Xanadu's mountain.

    Xanadu's livestock: the fowl of the air, the fish of the sea,

    the beast of the field and jungle two of each; the biggest

    private zoo since Noah. Contents of Kane's palace:

    paintings, pictures, statues, the very stones of many another

    palace, shipped to Florida from every corner of the earth,

    from other Kane houses, warehouses, where they

    mouldered for years. Enough for ten museums the loot of

    the world.

More shots as before, only this time we see (in miniature) a large mountain at different periods

    in its development rising out of the sands.

Shots of elephants, apes, zebras, etc. being herded, unloaded, shipped, etc. in various ways.

Shots of packing cases being unloaded from ships, from trains, from trucks, with various kinds of

    lettering on them (Italian, Arabian, Chinese, etc.) but all consigned to Charles Foster Kane,

    Xanadu, Florida.

    A reconstructed still of Xanadu the main terrace. A group of persons in clothes of the period of 1917. In their midst, clearly recognizable, are Kane and Susan.

    NARRATOR

    Kane urged his country's entry into one war, opposed

    participation in another. Swung the election to one

    American President at least, was called another's assassin.

    Thus, Kane's papers might never have survived had not

    the President.

TITLE:

"FROM XANADU, FOR THE PAST TWENTY-FIVE YEARS, ALL KANE

    ENTERPRISES HAVE BEEN DIRECTED, MANY OF THE NATIONS DESTINIES

    SHAPED."

Shots of various authentically worded headlines of American papers since 1895.

Spanish-American War shots. (1898)

A graveyard in France of the World War and hundreds of crosses. (1919)

Old newsreels of a political campaign.

Insert of a particularly virulent headline and/or cartoon.

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