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Leadership management

By Willie Collins,2014-02-15 20:11
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Leadership management

    Managing

    For

    Success

    Monday 18 - Tuesday 19 January 1999

    for

    BUSINESS OBJECTS

    COPYRIGHT NOTICE

     Copyright Leadership Development Ltd 1999. Unauthorised copying of this handout is prohibited. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be

    photocopied or reproduced in any form or by any electrical or mechanical means including information storage or retrieval systems without permission in writing from the copyright owner.

    15 MANAGEMENT PRINCIPLES

    1. If we want above average results, we must first become an

    above average person.

2. Management of people is a sales process.

    3. We don't discover our greatest potential. We DECIDE on it.

    4. Delegate the end result, not the method of achieving it.

    5. Catch people doing something right, or nearly right.

    6. People who feel good about themselves produce good results.

7. Regard everyone as a potential winner.

    8. Success by the inch is a cinch, by the yard it is hard.

9. Keep the leaders leading.

    10. Success is often dependent, not on doing amazing brilliant

    things, but on doing the commonplace unusually well.

11. Recognise the attitude demotivators.

12. Avoid making threats.

13. Work with the new people.

14. Be FOR things not against them.

    15. LAUGH. Diffuse confrontations with humour, laughter.

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    UNDERSTANDING LEADERSHIP

    Leadership and Teambuilding Imperatives

There are many ways to analyse effective leadership. The LDL approach is

    based on six imperatives:

     I CREATE A VISION

     II PROVIDE INSPIRATION

     III GROW YOUR PEOPLE

     IV THRIVE ON CHANGE

     V BE A LEARNER

     VI FOSTER COLLABORATION

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UNDERSTANDING LEADERSHIP - CONTINUED

MANAGEMENT AND LEADERSHIP

These are some of the observations made during LDL training courses on the

    differences between management and leadership.

     MANAGEMENT LEADERSHIP

     “A science” “An art”

     “Leadership without inspiration”

     “Control” “Empowerment”

     “Short term results” “Long term vision”

     “Plans and budgets” “Change and risk”

     “Standards” “Values”

     “You can appoint a manager ................... leaders must be accepted”

     “Direction” “Support and learning”

     “People need managers ...........................they long for leaders”

     “I‟m not going to have the “Powerlessness corrupts.

     monkeys running the zoo” Absolute powerlessness

     corrupts absolutely”

     “Cost walked in on two legs” “The difference is people”

     “Even though we had “The manager was wrong

     reservations about this we this time. It happens. We

     needed to show support for the reversed the decision”

     manager”

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UNDERSTANDING LEADERSHIP - CONTINUED

ACTION-CENTRED LEADERSHIP

    There are three main approaches to Leadership which have been pursued by researchers.

1. QUALITIES

    This approach concerns itself with identifying the traits or inner qualities

    which leaders must possess. Instinctively we know leaders have special

    qualities, but it is often difficult to pin these down.

    Fortune Magazine in the USA questioned seventy five top executives on

    leadership and they initially identified one hundred and seventy qualities.

    They then reduced these to the most important fifteen, which were:

     judgement, initiative, integrity, foresight, energy, drive, human

     relations skills, decisiveness, dependability, emotional stability,

     fairness, ambition, dedication, objectivity and co-operation.

    However when asked to define these qualities, it emerged that there was

    no generally accepted meaning.

    Qualities are vital to good leadership but they take time to identify and

    acquire.

2. SITUATIONAL LEADERSHIP

    This approach proposes that it is the situation which determines the leader

    and the style of leadership he has to adopt.

    It is true that leaders do emerge to meet special circumstances as is well

    illustrated by James Barrie in his play `The Admirable Crichton', and

    Churchill emerging at the start of the Second World War. Also special

    leaders are brought in during crises in industry. However most managers

    are expected to lead in a variety of changing circumstances and would be

    reluctant to accept change in the hierarchy for each change of

    circumstance.

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    UNDERSTANDING LEADERSHIP - CONTINUED

    Like the qualities approach, situational leadership skills take time to acquire.

    The session on Management Style later in the course will look at certain aspects of Situational Leadership.

The book „Leadership and The One Minute Manager‟ by Ken Blanchard

    provides an excellent insight into the situational approach.

    3. FUNCTIONAL LEADERSHIP

    Professor John Adair observed that the most practical way to regard leadership was to observe what a leader DOES. Whilst qualities and situations were undoubtedly important, in terms of developing leaders we made most progress when we concentrated on the actions leaders needed to take.

He narrowed these to three critical areas:

1. Achieving the Task

    2. Building the Team

    3. Meeting the needs of and developing the individual

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UNDERSTANDING LEADERSHIP - CONTINUED

These were depicted by three overlapping circles

     TASK

    TEAM INDIVIDUAL

    The circles overlapped in order to indicate that for leadership to be effective ALL THREE SETS OF ACTIONS had to be in harmony.

    If they were out of balance permanently or for a very long period of time then for that leader there would be severe adverse consequences.

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UNDERSTANDING LEADERSHIP - CONTINUED

Take three extreme situations:

1.

    TASK

    TEAM INDIVIDUAL

The TASK oriented leader :

    1. Loses support of his subordinates.

    2. The subordinates feel they don't matter (low morale). 3. They feel manipulated and therefore resentful. 4. They feel their skills are not utilised or recognised. 5. They don't communicate amongst themselves. 6. There is little feedback.

    7. They resent making any special efforts. 8. Wherever possible they leave.

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UNDERSTANDING LEADERSHIP - CONTINUED

2.

     TASK

     TEAM

    INDIVIDUAL

The TEAM oriented leader creates:

1. An easy going atmosphere.

    2. Many meetings.

    3. Few decisions.

    4. Little criticism.

    5. Discussions which are about problems not solutions. 6. Excessive socialising.

    7. Targets are not achieved. No-one gets blame. Always an excuse. 8. Talented individuals get frustrated because it takes so long to get action.

    9. An atmosphere where new ideas are slow to emerge because they need

    everyone's agreement.

    10. Talented people move on.

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UNDERSTANDING LEADERSHIP - CONTINUED

3.

    TASK

     INDIVIDUAL

     TEAM

    The INDIVIDUAL orientated leader creates:

1. Blue-eyed boys.

    2. Particular individuals blamed for everything . 3. Back biting amongst his or her subordinates. Politics. 4. Poor co-operation amongst team members. 5. Poor communication.

    6. Poor utilisation of talent. People are selected for tasks on the basis of

    likes and dislikes not suitability.

    7. Turnover of the „people they don't favour‟.

    8. Sometimes promotion for unsuitable „blue-eyed boys‟.

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